Help MosleyTheCat keep the forum running smoothly. Please DONATE using PayPal!

Author Topic: Practicing the full defense/realistic looks  (Read 125 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline jrk5150

  • Platinum
  • Posts: 7124
  • Coaching: 12 & Under
  • Defense: 3-3 Stack
  • Offense: Double Wing
  • Title: Head Coach
Practicing the full defense/realistic looks
« on: September 06, 2017, 12:29:06 PM »
Been running this D since 2009, so this is what - year 9.  In all this time, I never worried about a lot of adjustments, and specifically never really had to deal with good spread offenses.  It wasn't until last year that we started to see well-coached spread offenses that actually presented some challenges.  And we got burned.

So now I'm trying to figure a few things out. I have the talent to compete with every team in our conference.  But I need to figure out how to successfully practice the defense and give them a realistic look at what we're going to see on Sunday.  It was easy at the younger ages because we didn't see much different than what we did.  But we're not a spread team, so it's hard to figure out how to show the D how to react in space to some of the little things spread teams do.

I figure I can probably scrape up the bodies to practice my cover group as a shell and show them at least some realistic backfield actions in spread type sets.  Can I do that as a full 11 on 11 group?  Not so sure about that.  The kids I'd need on O to give a good look are the ones playing defense.  But I will try to mix and match and see what I can do.

Any other tips/tricks to practicing this defense?

Offline gumby_in_co

  • Silver
  • Posts: 2496
    • Keenan Curtis Mahoney Memorial Fund
  • Coaching: 14 & Under
  • Defense: 3-5-3
  • Offense: Multiple
  • Title: League Owner
Re: Practicing the full defense/realistic looks
« Reply #1 on: September 06, 2017, 12:44:05 PM »
A coach should play scout QB. Keeps the pace going and hopefully adds a little more competence to the scout O. Although, my son was stinking it up at scout QB, so I fired him and put myself in. I then stunk it up even worse.  >:(

You know what you're getting with the pressure group, so don't let them sack the QB or interfere with a pass. Last night, I went off on a kid for tomahawking my throwing arm. Starting Defense blew past my 1000th string o-line and took a hack at Coach Gumby. If you get a stacker making huge plays, take him out and run the same play without him. Put him on offense if you want. The point is, if he fails at his job, you want to see how your cover group reacts. Taking him out is a good way to ensure he fails at his job.

John, you know I'm a fan of JJ's defense, but we live for the day a defense tries to bring 6 on us in our spread look. I'd go Grim at the very least. I never read JJ's Spread adjustment. Never thought I'd need it back then.

Test your CB's and dogs against bubbles, arrows and quick outs. Test your Reaper against quick slants and drags. Test them all with some skinny posts.
"Family on me, Family on three!" - KCM

Arvada Outlaws
8th Grade D2

Keenan Curtis Mahoney Memorial Fund
https://www.gofundme.com/fwf5zx7e

Offline spidermac

  • Silver
  • Posts: 2022
  • Coaching: 10 & Under
  • Defense: 6-3
  • Offense: Pistol
  • Title: Head Coach
Re: Practicing the full defense/realistic looks
« Reply #2 on: September 06, 2017, 01:04:23 PM »
We have that same issue, bodies to give the defense a good look...like Gumby said, I am the scout QB...then I do half line stuff. This season we are out of the stacks and doing the KB thing, but we did the same thing last season too.

The first time we faced a good spread team with this defense was my first season running it, and we got torched, think we gave up a season high 36 points or somesuch. We were sending 8 and not getting there...and to be perfectly honest, we have not seen a really well coached spread team since...so sending 8 worked.

I know that was probably not helpful :P

So Like I said, half line thing is what we do to get some play flow for them to read.


None of them suck, they just haven't found what the kid is good at yet.

Online coacharnold

  • Copper
  • Posts: 421
  • Coaching: High School
  • Defense: Other
  • Offense: Other
  • Title: Assistant
Re: Practicing the full defense/realistic looks
« Reply #3 on: September 06, 2017, 03:50:16 PM »
Alignment isn't that hard: draw a line down the middle of your defense and teach each side how to adjust to:

Nub (TE only)
Split (SE only)
Twins
Trips
Pro (TE and SE)
Trey (TE and 2 WRs)
Wing (TE and WB)

Teaching and repping those 7 looks will dramatically simplify just getting them lined up to spread sets.  Have them call the strength away from the back when you see offset gun.

For formation adjustments, if you have a little cash, invest in a bunch of large trash cans (I've found them for $9 each at Wal-Mart) and use those to simulate the 5 eligible receivers with a "coach" lined up as QB calling a defense--use cones to simulate the OL with a ball for the C.  Have players running from station to station in a circuit just lining up and going through their first 2 steps.  Ideally, you can get 3 stations going at once with 2 groups of kids and move the third one around a little bit while it's not being used.  You can get TONS of work done this way and you don't even need to worry about telling the cans where to line up or to stand still!

You can even make the trash cans a dummy OL for walking through stunts and teaching gap assignments to the DL and LBs in other drills.  It's almost like adding extra scout players who never miss, get hurt, complain, or blow their assignments :)

Do tons of half line.

Keep a coach at QB who can make the throws and know what he's doing.  Just have him hold the ball and simulate the snap so you don't have to constantly struggle just to get a decent snap off.  Nothing bogs practice down quicker than having to re-snap and re-snap on scout O until you finally get it.

Work a perimeter drill with your overhangs and DBs against an offense--basically a 7 on 7 thing, with the addition of outside runs (Jet Sweep, QB Sweep, etc.).  Throw some bubble screens and quick game.

If numbers are an issue, you can do this as a half-line thing, too, to work good on good (it'll basically wind up as 3-6 of your defensive players against 4-6 offensive players).

Then do an inside run drill (I call it "hull drill") with the stacks playing 6 on 7 offensive players.  This, again, can be a half-line drill if absolutely necessary due to numbers: 4 on 5 is fine.

When you're doing inside run drill, try to find the common link between the blocking schemes you teach your players on offense and the ones the spread teams are running.  Most spread teams will run Inside Zone, Power, Counter, Trap, Sweep, and maybe a Lead play.  Do you use any of those?  If so, just tell your scout OL "ok, this is Power right" or even simplify it down to "ok, just block down to the left."

Work a bunch of pursuit angles to teach leverage and angles.  You can work a scramble drill in there with the coach, too.

The more individual time you can get with your kids to work coverage technique, the better.  Instead of trying to show them how to play a bubble screen or in 11 vs. 11, you can show that with 2 on 2 in Indy.  Instead of trying to show the whole team how to play zone read, teach that to your DL and LBs during Indy while your secondary works on the bubbles and stuff.  Etc.
« Last Edit: September 06, 2017, 03:56:14 PM by coacharnold »

Online mahonz

  • Administrator
  • Geek
  • Posts: 22507
  • No Wimps
  • Coaching: 14 & Under
  • Defense: 3-5-3
  • Offense: Multiple
  • Title: Assistant
Re: Practicing the full defense/realistic looks
« Reply #4 on: September 06, 2017, 03:51:59 PM »
Been running this D since 2009, so this is what - year 9.  In all this time, I never worried about a lot of adjustments, and specifically never really had to deal with good spread offenses.  It wasn't until last year that we started to see well-coached spread offenses that actually presented some challenges.  And we got burned.

So now I'm trying to figure a few things out. I have the talent to compete with every team in our conference.  But I need to figure out how to successfully practice the defense and give them a realistic look at what we're going to see on Sunday.  It was easy at the younger ages because we didn't see much different than what we did.  But we're not a spread team, so it's hard to figure out how to show the D how to react in space to some of the little things spread teams do.

I figure I can probably scrape up the bodies to practice my cover group as a shell and show them at least some realistic backfield actions in spread type sets.  Can I do that as a full 11 on 11 group?  Not so sure about that.  The kids I'd need on O to give a good look are the ones playing defense.  But I will try to mix and match and see what I can do.

Any other tips/tricks to practicing this defense?

Running a decent Scout is an Art Form. With 30 players you should be fine.

Just take Lar's advise and have one of your coaches play QB full time. Start your 11 on D and use the others to play O. With so many available you can give your D a nice look.

I have a TON of Scout O experience as the QB....OL stays on the LOS...quick huddle with the eligibles...tell everyone what to do in 8 seconds....come the line and quickly tap each OLM and point at who they are blocking....run play. Do this as fast as you can only slowing down so the D coaches can coach when necessary. Does not make any difference if your plays look good or even work....just give the D a good look at all the actions.

And by all means your Scout QB should be doing some things to abuse the D. Rather easy to do when an Adult is running the Offense with enough players to get some work in.

Oh...and everything is on ONE ! Cant expect a backup CB to be going on TWO. Reps reps reps is all you want.
« Last Edit: September 06, 2017, 03:54:48 PM by mahonz »
Collect moments, not wins.