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Author Topic: Covering an "Empty Backfield"?  (Read 4691 times)

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Offline DumCoach

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Covering an "Empty Backfield"?
« on: June 11, 2011, 07:48:08 PM »
I posted this question over in the General Defense Section yesterday.  It seemed to be hard to cover so I was wondering how Jack covered these?

First:

         O              O O 0 O O               O
                 O                          O   O
                                 O


And last: 

         O              O O 0 O O                 O
                                            O   O  O
                                 O

I was wondering what tricks you guys use to cover this and the coaching points and where the weakness or dangers lie?
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Offline jrk5150

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Re: Covering an "Empty Backfield"?
« Reply #1 on: June 11, 2011, 09:45:21 PM »
I'll give you what I'd do out of JJ's 33 stack:

With JJ's rules, no TE means the outside stacks move up onto the LOS outside the T, and they come hard.

On the first one, I'd do the following:

The RCB would be 9 yards deep over that left SE.  The Dog (DE) would end up moving out to head up on the left slot, or slightly inside of him.  Same alignment on the right side of the offense, but the Dog would be out head up on the inside right slot.  I'd probably shad the R (Mike) over to about the RT.  If I wasn't worried about the QB running up the middle, I might go GRIM and drop the middle stacker back into the middle as a second R/Mike, and shade the R even more over to the trips.  If they ran speed motion right, I'd roll the R over for sure, and I'm not sure what I'd do with the right dog.  He's kind of excess.  Maybe roll him over into the middle to tap and go from the middle stacker position to get pressure up the middle if I was in Grim (no middle stacker, two Reapers).  Maybe just leave him coming hard from the backside to protect against counter/reverse.

Probably do the same on the second one, except I'd definitely shade the R all the way over.  I might pull my right Dog and put in a second R playing the middle since my right stack is coming off the edge unblocked.  That way I'd also have my middle stacker playing tap and go off the center.

If they ran speed motion to the left on this, then that R would come up to play dog, and the R over that receiver would go back to the middle.

Is the QB straight behind the C on this?  He looks offset, but I assumed that was a mistake.

QB is going to have 2-3 seconds to make a throw, so I think the CB's playing 9 yards deep will prevent the fade/go route.  They can only throw short, and I'm confident that my best players in the cover group will be able to converge fast.

If the QB was fast and running sweeps behind all those blockers, then I'd definitely swap out the middle stacker for a second reaper so we'd again have the advantage of #'s.

Offline Dusty Ol Fart

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Re: Covering an "Empty Backfield"?
« Reply #2 on: June 11, 2011, 10:53:08 PM »
Honestly I don't see any empty sets.  We are pretty much in a run oriented league.

In the first scenario I would simply put the DE in shallow coverage with DB playing Deep and OSLB dropping into his Zone,  I am betting that since the QB has no protection the WSDE will get to him quickly or, at the very least force an early  throw.

In Scenario 2, I go Cover 3 with Mike taking the deep middle (shaded). Again since the Weak side is covered by the DB I would make a Gap call with the WSOSLB, thus making it Impossible for them to block the WSDE.  I can still Zone Drop the LB.  I am simply betting that my unblocked DE will force the QB early or make him run.

If they start completing things on a consistent basis I can go Cover 3 and drop both DE's into coverage as well.  Essentially forcing that QB to be very accurate if he finds a hole. 

I might get brazen and send the SSDE ala a Corner Blitz just to test the QB's cahones and see if he has the touch to throw over the top without over throwing the ball.  My bet is that the flight instinct will set in and he will try to outrun the DE.

As I see it the "weakness" of the defense does not change.  You have a small window underneath and thats fine.  I know guys like Man Coverage but I remind them that the Zones get smaller as the field shrinks.  What was once open is now covered simply because you ran out of real estate to work in. 

Im sure Jack will have a more adept solution.       
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Offline coachgregory

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Re: Covering an "Empty Backfield"?
« Reply #3 on: June 12, 2011, 03:28:42 PM »
I posted this question over in the General Defense Section yesterday.  It seemed to be hard to cover so I was wondering how Jack covered these?

First:

         O              O O 0 O O               O
                 O                          O   O
                                 O


And last: 

         O              O O 0 O O                 O
                                            O   O  O
                                 O

I was wondering what tricks you guys use to cover this and the coaching points and where the weakness or dangers lie?


Clark as a base we would initially align like this with a SPREAD call and that is only if I respect the offense enough to think they can actually pass the ball otherwise I am going to stay in STACK and attack them and let them prove they can get the ball to a receiver if so we go SPREAD:

---------c---------------------------------------c
---------------------------m
-------------b-----------------------------b
-----------------e---t-g----g-t---e
----o----------------o-o-x-o-o---------------------o
----------o----------------------------o------o
---------------------------o

TRIPS

---------c--------------------------------------------c
---------------------------m-----------m(rover)
-------------b---------------------------------b
-----------------e---t-g----g-t---e
----o----------------o-o-x-o-o------------------------o
--------------------------------------o----o------o
---------------------------o
QUADS


On the twins side the CB will be at 8 to 10 yards off the ball and tilted inside between the SE and SLOT and the OLB will be 3 to 4 yards off the ball split the distance the DE and the SLOT and be tilted inside.  They will read the inital movement of the QB as the take a pass drop...  The DE will align with 2 to 3 yards width and they will take their HUNT & READ approach.  MIKE will be PASS alert so he will read but not attack downhill and will be slow to flow to QB facemask until he verifies no threat of QB run/draw.  On the TRIPS side the DE will be alert to any quick pass to his side as he HUNTS (HUNT and READ).  In QUADS I would not move the MIKE unless I thought we needed to...in that case I would ROVER him so that he splits the difference between the DE and OLB at his depth and he is titled.  There are some other things we can do but that is what we would initially do as a reaction.
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Offline DumCoach

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Re: Covering an "Empty Backfield"?
« Reply #4 on: June 13, 2011, 03:15:32 AM »

Clark as a base we would initially align like this with a SPREAD call and that is only if I respect the offense enough to think they can actually pass the ball otherwise I am going to stay in STACK and attack them and let them prove they can get the ball to a receiver if so we go SPREAD:

---------c---------------------------------------c
---------------------------m
-------------b-----------------------------b
-----------------e---t-g----g-t---e
----o----------------o-o-x-o-o---------------------o
----------O----------------------------o------o
---------------------------o

TRIPS

Five cannot block six.

But I imagine Ted Seay would have something to say about covering 3 with 2.

So you're dealing with the trade off of whether the offense is bluffing or not?

My own personal opinion is that if a coach goes to an empty backfied, it's to throw to the back that would normally be in the backfield.  I suspect he's the receiver in bold above.




Quote
---------c--------------------------------------------c
---------------------------m-----------m(rover)
-------------b---------------------------------b
-----------------e---t-g----g-t---e
----o----------------o-o-x-o-o------------------------o
--------------------------------------O----o------o
---------------------------o
QUADS

Again, five cannot block six.

But now 3 are covering 4.  That's your tradeoff.

Again, I suspect the running back moved to receiver is the one in bold.

Have you faced an empty backfield?  I'm curious about your success versus their success.  I am not asking as a means to beat you.  I'm just wondering what works.


It doesn't seem like they could have many plays from empty, maybe 2-3 and, almost certainly, one is a screen.  You're not leaving that QB much time to throw.

Quote
On the twins side the CB will be at 8 to 10 yards off the ball and tilted inside between the SE and SLOT and the OLB will be 3 to 4 yards off the ball split the distance the DE and the SLOT and be tilted inside.

This is where I expect the throw - directed to receiver #2.



Quote
They will read the inital movement of the QB as the take a pass drop...  The DE will align with 2 to 3 yards width and they will take their HUNT & READ approach.  MIKE will be PASS alert so he will read but not attack downhill and will be slow to flow to QB facemask until he verifies no threat of QB run/draw.

OK.  So no one went "man under" on the Twins side versus #2?  If you go to my post in the General Defense Forum on 4-3 Zone versus empty backfield, "man under" is a predominant theme amongst the offered solutions.  Yours is radically different.  What's your logic versus theirs? 

Again, not trying to use your answer against you.  If I ran my own DCWT "empty backfield" against you, a slot would be assigned to a DE so that 6 block 6.  I don't have a 2 second QB.  In effect, I'd be one of those bluffing you and which you seem to be expecting.

So evidently the inclusion of spread at the youth level hasn't changed the age old problem that youth teams can't pass?


Quote
  On the TRIPS side the DE will be alert to any quick pass to his side as he HUNTS (HUNT and READ).

But isn't screen to the Trips the obvious throw here?



Quote
  In QUADS I would not move the MIKE unless I thought we needed to...in that case I would ROVER him so that he splits the difference between the DE and OLB at his depth and he is titled.

M is your adjustor?  That's what I would do too. 

It looks like you're daring the offense to put two deep versus Quads.  If so, it's probably a safe bet the pass has been called to the under route.  Is this your experience?

Again, if you've never actually faced an empty backfield, let me know.  I figure those who run it against you are thinking screen and "under" versus deep.  If that's true, please confirm.  I've never, ever, seen a youth team come out in Quads (too many receivers, not enough area, means to me primary is running under while the others run deep.).

Your thinking is 180 degrees from the responses I got in the General Defense Section.  Most defended the screen first, the most expected play IMO.


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Offline DumCoach

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Re: Covering an "Empty Backfield"?
« Reply #5 on: June 13, 2011, 03:41:18 AM »
Honestly I don't see any empty sets.  We are pretty much in a run oriented league.

Which is exactly why my DCWT includes an "empty set".  But now I have the problem of defending it versus using it.

Quote
In the first scenario I would simply put the DE in shallow coverage with DB playing Deep and OSLB dropping into his Zone,  I am betting that since the QB has no protection the WSDE will get to him quickly or, at the very least force an early  throw.

5 cannot block 6. 

If I'm not mistaken, you're daring the offense to throw deep to the #2 twins receiver?

Because I see #2 slot as the primary receiver of this formation.  The route he runs is based on QB's time to throw.

Have never run this offensive formation so can't comment beyond "I don't have a QB for this play".  Wish I did.  Had one once.  But the year I got him no one could catch the ball he threw.

That's actually more expected than unexpected.  Good receivers are hard to come by and, when you do get one, it's usually not in the same year you get a good QB.




Quote
In Scenario 2, I go Cover 3 with Mike taking the deep middle (shaded). Again since the Weak side is covered by the DB I would make a Gap call with the WSOSLB, thus making it Impossible for them to block the WSDE.

Gap-Slide protection?

Roll QB strong?


Quote
  I can still Zone Drop the LB.  I am simply betting that my unblocked DE will force the QB early or make him run.

I think that's a good bet.  Rollouts and Gap-Slide are pretty rare at the youth level.  Unless, of course, you face me.
 


Quote
If they start completing things on a consistent basis I can go Cover 3 and drop both DE's into coverage as well.  Essentially forcing that QB to be very accurate if he finds a hole. 

Wish I had such a QB. 

But if I see you in Cover 3, I'm throwing screen.
That I can complete.




Quote
I might get brazen and send the SSDE ala a Corner Blitz just to test the QB's cahones and see if he has the touch to throw over the top without over throwing the ball.  My bet is that the flight instinct will set in and he will try to outrun the DE.

Except on rollout, I think the QB is limited to throwing blind downfield on a 2 second throw to a heavily repped route/receiver.


Quote
As I see it the "weakness" of the defense does not change.  You have a small window underneath and thats fine.  I know guys like Man Coverage but I remind them that the Zones get smaller as the field shrinks.  What was once open is now covered simply because you ran out of real estate to work in. 

And time.

I'd coach for you anytime.   ;)

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Offline DumCoach

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Re: Covering an "Empty Backfield"?
« Reply #6 on: June 13, 2011, 03:42:05 AM »
I'll give you what I'd do out of JJ's 33 stack:

With JJ's rules, no TE means the outside stacks move up onto the LOS outside the T, and they come hard.

On the first one, I'd do the following:

The RCB would be 9 yards deep over that left SE.  The Dog (DE) would end up moving out to head up on the left slot, or slightly inside of him.  Same alignment on the right side of the offense, but the Dog would be out head up on the inside right slot.  I'd probably shad the R (Mike) over to about the RT.  If I wasn't worried about the QB running up the middle, I might go GRIM and drop the middle stacker back into the middle as a second R/Mike, and shade the R even more over to the trips.  If they ran speed motion right, I'd roll the R over for sure, and I'm not sure what I'd do with the right dog.  He's kind of excess.  Maybe roll him over into the middle to tap and go from the middle stacker position to get pressure up the middle if I was in Grim (no middle stacker, two Reapers).  Maybe just leave him coming hard from the backside to protect against counter/reverse.

Probably do the same on the second one, except I'd definitely shade the R all the way over.  I might pull my right Dog and put in a second R playing the middle since my right stack is coming off the edge unblocked.  That way I'd also have my middle stacker playing tap and go off the center.

If they ran speed motion to the left on this, then that R would come up to play dog, and the R over that receiver would go back to the middle.

Is the QB straight behind the C on this?  He looks offset, but I assumed that was a mistake.

QB is going to have 2-3 seconds to make a throw, so I think the CB's playing 9 yards deep will prevent the fade/go route.  They can only throw short, and I'm confident that my best players in the cover group will be able to converge fast.

If the QB was fast and running sweeps behind all those blockers, then I'd definitely swap out the middle stacker for a second reaper so we'd again have the advantage of #'s.

I wasn't expecting this reply.  Give me time o get back to you.
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Offline jrk5150

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Re: Covering an "Empty Backfield"?
« Reply #7 on: June 13, 2011, 09:28:53 AM »
Sorry Clark, I know I jumped in with a different D than you asked.

Just to advise you to the philosophy of the D - it is to NOT get out of what we do as much as possible until we determine what the O can do with that formation.  Additionally, we're operating under the assumption (and all the danger that entails) that the O is bluffing, and/or that because that cover group (Dogs and DB's) are my 5 best, that SOMEONE you put out there to block is going to be mismatched.  So if/when I'm covering 2 with 1 (rare, there's usually a 2nd within pretty close proximity), 3 with 2 (actually common), or 4 with 3 (haven't had to), I'm counting on someone on my side flat out beating their block to make the play, or at least delay the ball enough for others to get off their blocks to make the play.

I'll also try to diagram what I'm talking about...

Offline jrk5150

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Re: Covering an "Empty Backfield"?
« Reply #8 on: June 13, 2011, 09:42:32 AM »
S = stackers

          RCB                                       LCB
                                       R

                 RD           S              LD 
                      S  T    N     T S
         O              O O 0 O O               O
                 O                          O   O
                                 O

If L slot motions right, I'd probably roll R over to behind the LD and slide the LD out a bit more.  RD would come hard to cover QB fake or reverse.  As would that backside S.  Being that they are superfluous, I MIGHT choose to roll the RD back to the middle as a second R.  Or just have him go with motion and pursue outside in if the ball goes to the motion back.  But I really hate to completely bail on that backside, so I'd probably just roll him to the middle so he can still cover BCR.  Right slot motions left, R just slides over.

       RCB                                          LCB
                                     
                                                    R
                  D             S             D
                      S  T    N     T  S
         O              O O 0 O O                 O
                                            O   O  O
                                 O

If a right slot motions left, R would just slide over a bit to match the above formation.

OR

       RCB                                          LCB
                                 R     
                                                    R
                                S             D
                      S  T    N     T  S
         O              O O 0 O O                 O
                                            O   O  O
                                 O

If one of the guys on the right motions left, the center R would slide over to Right Dog, and the R over the quads would slide a bit back towards the center, maybe stop around the S on the now trips side.
« Last Edit: June 13, 2011, 09:47:02 AM by jkoester »

Offline coachgregory

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Re: Covering an "Empty Backfield"?
« Reply #9 on: June 13, 2011, 02:39:42 PM »
Five cannot block six.

But I imagine Ted Seay would have something to say about covering 3 with 2.

So you're dealing with the trade off of whether the offense is bluffing or not?


My own personal opinion is that if a coach goes to an empty backfied, it's to throw to the back that would normally be in the backfield.  I suspect he's the receiver in bold above.


Remember we play space and ball and not players...I am not concerned with the players as with the amount of space I need to defend with my players.

I agree that when a team goes empty it is to put the ball into the best players hand in space.. So we call DANGER side to the HB often (and more often than not that is the wide side of the field or the near side :) )




Again, five cannot block six.

But now 3 are covering 4.  That's your tradeoff.


I am believer in bringing pressure and let the passer and the pass protection prove they can actually protect the ball and the ball will be accurate.

I am not cover 3 with 4 I am covering space with three defenders...the four players are not an issue for me.



Again, I suspect the running back moved to receiver is the one in bold.

Have you faced an empty backfield?  I'm curious about your success versus their success.  I am not asking as a means to beat you.  I'm just wondering what works.


It doesn't seem like they could have many plays from empty, maybe 2-3 and, almost certainly, one is a screen.  You're not leaving that QB much time to throw.

This is where I expect the throw - directed to receiver #2.


I would think you are right in your assumpation.  But I have also seen teams run shallows and shallow crosses as well out of empty.  My first concern is to not give up the deep pass which is why we attempt to sit in inverted cover 2 to take away the obvious deep fade/fly/out/corner routes.


I coach in Texas...the spread is very popular as is the Air Raid spread. I have been shredded by one spread team who ran empty against us in 2005 and since then I learned a lot about how to defend it.  Since then we don't give up many points to spread teams.

Screens and short route concepts to the flat and hook zones as well as shallow crosses are what I see most often.  If the QB is athletic the will empty to open up space to let him run as well.  Since we have number we don't see the run that often...but we see a lot of bubble screens, rocket screens, and smash concepts as well as a few other things to the flat.  This is handled by our SHOOTING THE SIDELINES CONCEPT and good coverage technique in our zone.



OK.  So no one went "man under" on the Twins side versus #2?  If you go to my post in the General Defense Forum on 4-3 Zone versus empty backfield, "man under" is a predominant theme amongst the offered solutions.  Yours is radically different.  What's your logic versus theirs? 

Again, not trying to use your answer against you.  If I ran my own DCWT "empty backfield" against you, a slot would be assigned to a DE so that 6 block 6.  I don't have a 2 second QB.  In effect, I'd be one of those bluffing you and which you seem to be expecting.



So evidently the inclusion of spread at the youth level hasn't changed the age old problem that youth teams can't pass?


Because I never claimed to think like the masses...:)

On the twins side we have actually two covering two initially with the DE reading the QUICK KEY.  If he shows screen the twins side DE will drop and rob and the trips side DE will kill the QB.  But if the QB looks down field he sees both DE's coming and if he looks to the TRIPS side the TRIPS DE will drop and rob flat and the twins side will kill the QB...  We get an extra coverage guy against short routes but if the short flat is not what the QB is looking for he gets extra pressure...the QB never knows...until he makes his pass read.

Exactly...  And I very rarely see a slot who is outside of my DE ever touch my DE as he goes inside to HUNT... it is to tough of a block since the DE is not reading...he is hunting and reading as he hunts into the backfield which means he is moving away from the slot.
But isn't screen to the Trips the obvious throw here?

We face a few good spread passing teams each year and one gives us problems and one doesn't.  The one that does we have face in the DPL championship twice and beat them once and lost once.  We don't plan on losing against them anymore :)



M is your adjustor?  That's what I would do too. 

It looks like you're daring the offense to put two deep versus Quads.  If so, it's probably a safe bet the pass has been called to the under route.  Is this your experience?


Mike is are adjustor.  If we think we need to adjust we move the OLB's first, then our MIKE...  We have the ability to go into man coverage and then when we do it is press coverage and we can put our CB's, OLB's, and even our DE's into press cover so we don't let a team know exactly who will get covered. Inverted cover 2 takes care of the majority of our problems as it converts easily into cover 3 and we get additional zone support from our DE's when it is needed on either side.



Again, if you've never actually faced an empty backfield, let me know.  I figure those who run it against you are thinking screen and "under" versus deep.  If that's true, please confirm.  I've never, ever, seen a youth team come out in Quads (too many receivers, not enough area, means to me primary is running under while the others run deep.).

Your thinking is 180 degrees from the responses I got in the General Defense Section.  Most defended the screen first, the most expected play IMO.

I have never seen quads but I have seen trips with a rb aligned on the same side which to me is the same as quads and the description I presented is how we handled it.

Because we teach space and ball the amount of players is not the issue the space we have to defend is the issue.

Jack
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Offline Dusty Ol Fart

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Re: Covering an "Empty Backfield"?
« Reply #10 on: June 13, 2011, 06:39:21 PM »
Which is exactly why my DCWT includes an "empty set".  But now I have the problem of defending it versus using it.

5 cannot block 6. 

If I'm not mistaken, you're daring the offense to throw deep to the #2 twins receiver?

Because I see #2 slot as the primary receiver of this formation.  The route he runs is based on QB's time to throw. Have never run this offensive formation so can't comment beyond "I don't have a QB for this play".  Wish I did.  Had one once.  But the year I got him no one could catch the ball he threw.

That's actually more expected than unexpected.  Good receivers are hard to come by and, when you do get one, it's usually not in the same year you get a good QB.

Gap-Slide protection?

Roll QB strong?

I think that's a good bet.  Rollouts and Gap-Slide are pretty rare at the youth level.  Unless, of course, you face me.

Wish I had such a QB. 

But if I see you in Cover 3, I'm throwing screen.
That I can complete.

Except on rollout, I think the QB is limited to throwing blind downfield on a 2 second throw to a heavily repped route/receiver.

And time.

I'd coach for you anytime.   ;)

Thanks.  ;)

Let me preface this by saying your darn tootin I am daring you to pass,  I'm betting more than even money that I can get 2 DE's to the QB before the WR gets to the spot.  I am willing to give up a short flare or Bubble screen because I have numbers coming downhill.  You do indeed have to prove that you can pass consistently.  As you point out its a rarity that folks find enough skilled at the same time to be effective both running and throwing.  As you add they will indeed flank their backs or back out that should be an indicator.  Indeed 5 cannot block 6 same basic premise as the 46 bring more than they can block.  Slide protection had better be damned quick to reach the DE with the "Crazy Split" what would end up happening is that the LMOLOS will tray and drop back to get at him thus breaking down the protection scheme.   A roll out strong might work but when we add in the fact that, most kids have a hell of a time throwing accurately on a consistent basis now he's rolling.  That lessens the odds of success even more.  If he does stop the WSDE is chasing the rabbit so the clock is ticking.  You are right when faced with pressure kids will either Chuck and Duck or RUN!   Even when you practice the Chuck and Duck your not really able to time it.  Too many variables.  I have actually had a DE take the ball out of the QB's hand on a pass. 

The thing to remember, that many youth coaches overlook,  is to think in terms of what the very best athlete in your age group is capable of.  Take that and say 1 kid on each team can do that.  Can the other players on the field do the other things needed (Block, Pass, Run, Catch) or is it a one man show?  Odds are no they can't unless they are drafted for select teams.  Don't over analyze and especially don't analyze them to a level that they can't compete to.   
Not MPP... ONE TASK!  Teach them!  :)

Offline CoachAD

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Re: Covering an "Empty Backfield"?
« Reply #11 on: June 19, 2011, 02:20:39 PM »
  Most empty backfields we have faced, and it has been very few. are trying to vacate the LB's and get the QB a crease up the middle.

  One team in particular tried that and I went to a Mike blitz through the Center with both A and B gaps filled.  4th and 1 and we got him for a 2 yard loss.  They tried empty one more time and we went middle blitz again, the QB tried to run from it and we got him for a 4 yard loss. They didn't go empty anymore.

Offline Jtatham

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Re: Covering an "Empty Backfield"?
« Reply #12 on: July 25, 2016, 11:29:59 AM »

Clark as a base we would initially align like this with a SPREAD call and that is only if I respect the offense enough to think they can actually pass the ball otherwise I am going to stay in STACK and attack them and let them prove they can get the ball to a receiver if so we go SPREAD:

---------c---------------------------------------c
---------------------------m
-------------b-----------------------------b
-----------------e---t-g----g-t---e
----o----------------o-o-x-o-o---------------------o
----------o----------------------------o------o
---------------------------o

TRIPS

---------c--------------------------------------------c
---------------------------m-----------m(rover)
-------------b---------------------------------b
-----------------e---t-g----g-t---e
----o----------------o-o-x-o-o------------------------o
--------------------------------------o----o------o
---------------------------o
QUADS


On the twins side the CB will be at 8 to 10 yards off the ball and tilted inside between the SE and SLOT and the OLB will be 3 to 4 yards off the ball split the distance the DE and the SLOT and be tilted inside.  They will read the inital movement of the QB as the take a pass drop...  The DE will align with 2 to 3 yards width and they will take their HUNT & READ approach.  MIKE will be PASS alert so he will read but not attack downhill and will be slow to flow to QB facemask until he verifies no threat of QB run/draw.  On the TRIPS side the DE will be alert to any quick pass to his side as he HUNTS (HUNT and READ).  In QUADS I would not move the MIKE unless I thought we needed to...in that case I would ROVER him so that he splits the difference between the DE and OLB at his depth and he is titled.  There are some other things we can do but that is what we would initially do as a reaction.

Coach vs Quads shouldn't your front be a 50? It looks like you've got 12 defending 11.

Online Wing-n-It

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Re: Covering an "Empty Backfield"?
« Reply #13 on: July 25, 2016, 11:55:21 AM »
Coach vs Quads shouldn't your front be a 50? It looks like you've got 12 defending 11.
That's the best way to cover quads  ;)

The Mike in 2 spots is IF saw a need to move him/Rover.

Re read the quads description

Man, way to pull an old thread out of the bottom of the barrel.

You do research quite well and thoroughly. I am probably going to send you an IM with my number incase you need a human voice explanations.
 
Robert

2 Things my offense will always have is a Wing and a Wedge

Offline Jtatham

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Re: Covering an "Empty Backfield"?
« Reply #14 on: July 25, 2016, 02:27:47 PM »
That's the best way to cover quads  ;)

The Mike in 2 spots is IF saw a need to move him/Rover.

Re read the quads description

Man, way to pull an old thread out of the bottom of the barrel.

You do research quite well and thoroughly. I am probably going to send you an IM with my number incase you need a human voice explanations.
 

Haha! Just now saw your post. I appreciate that, I just try to learn as much about the game as possible. Borderline obsessive, but aren't all coaches? :P