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Author: Subject: Making a kid more aggressive
dcpbiscuit
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[*] posted on 12-6-2007 at 02:34 PM Reply With Quote
Making a kid more aggressive



I am lost on how to make my son more aggressive on the field.He is not a small child with his size he should be able to block any kid in our league.I am not one these parents that make there child play a sport. He came to me wanting to play football.This was only his second year playing and he made the all-star team but only as a back up lineman.Any help with this is greatly appreciated.
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defensewins
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[*] posted on 12-6-2007 at 02:57 PM Reply With Quote


doing some of this would help:

http://www.andrew.cmu.edu/course/70-415/images/head_into_brick_wall.gif
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CoachDP
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[*] posted on 12-6-2007 at 03:01 PM Reply With Quote


How old is he?

--Dave
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dcpbiscuit
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[*] posted on 12-6-2007 at 04:19 PM Reply With Quote


10 yrs old he has done a complete 360 from last year .I will give him credit there.I just wish he would have the same attitude on the field
as he does towards his sister.If he did he would be unstoppable.
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scott
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[*] posted on 12-6-2007 at 04:26 PM Reply With Quote


well Im no genyus but those bulls seem awfully pissed off when they get their balls strapped before that gate opens.
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BillyT
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[*] posted on 12-6-2007 at 04:46 PM Reply With Quote


We had a lot of success this year getting our o line aggressive using the sumo drill. Kids love it and I did what everyone said on this forum I had a tournament at the end of the year and crowned one kid the champ. The champ got the brackets ( like wrestling) and a t shirt with 2007 sumo drill champ on the back.Next year I m going to put in more mini tournaments thru out the season I believe in the sumo drill for getting the aggressiveness out them.
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coltscoach
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[*] posted on 12-6-2007 at 07:09 PM Reply With Quote


Quote:
Originally posted by scott
well Im no genyus but those bulls seem awfully pissed off when they get their balls strapped before that gate opens.


I think that might be on the border of child abuse but Hey if it works for you....

Note to self when playing coach scotts teams "wear spurs and hang on for 8 seconds."




Im back
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dcpbiscuit
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[*] posted on 12-6-2007 at 07:30 PM Reply With Quote


explain the sumo drill might try it next season
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mrdeadeye
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[*] posted on 12-6-2007 at 10:08 PM Reply With Quote


Quote:
Originally posted by dcpbiscuit
explain the sumo drill might try it next season


get some spraypaint- make a circle.

put 2 kids in the middle of the circle.

Have em block until one either gets knocked down or pushed out of the circle.

It is especially good for teaching them because while they are doing it I am shouting instructions at them.

And its great for endurance. I have had them go upwards of 5 minutes without stopping.

And it makes blocking cool. Everybody wants to be the sumo champion.

We used it every day and it worked like a charm. As much as anything else with 6-8 year olds can.


TW




Winners make it happen......Losers Make Excuses
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jacketcoach
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[*] posted on 12-6-2007 at 11:54 PM Reply With Quote


Coach,

I, also, have a 10 year old who is very much like your own. Let me see.... Does any of this sound familiar?

1) Close to max weight limit, but not fat
2) Very strong and solid for his age group
3) Likes to beat the crap out of his older sister, who is usually minding her own business
4) Can usually be found in the nieghbors front yard pinning his best friend to the ground for no apparent reason.
5) Gets an aggressive attitude when dinner is not done on time.
6) Is known to lift opposing defensive lineman out of thier shoes with ease, when the game is already decided or is at a point of being meaningless, but lets the same kids into the backfield countless times when the game is still on the line.
7) Has great potential, shows it in spurts, but usually disappoints his coaches, who very much want and need him to excell more consistantly
8) Will dominate at one on one practice drills, but seems oblivious to team blocking concepts

Even though he loves the game of football, (can't get enough), for some reason when the pressure is off or he is just given a simple blocking assignment,( Tear #76 a new one!) he plays his very best football and usually opens a hole a mack truck could drive through.

Anyone care to take a guess?
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dcpbiscuit
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[*] posted on 12-7-2007 at 05:03 AM Reply With Quote


Are you sure don't have my sons twin?
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CoachDP
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[*] posted on 12-7-2007 at 08:14 AM Reply With Quote


Quote:
Originally posted by dcpbiscuit
I am lost on how to make my son more aggressive on the field. Any help with this is greatly appreciated.


Coach,

You might try this drill. It has helped with our aggression, toughness and ball awareness:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DYV6g3TTn84

--Dave
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coachjs
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[*] posted on 12-7-2007 at 10:15 AM Reply With Quote


The following article was published by DC somewhere back around early 2004. This article is based on the same issue of trying to make a kid more aggressive. It's a very good article by DC.

DC I hope you don't mind me submitting this article again.

A lamb to become a tiger? By DC
In Reply to: Re: A lamb to become a tiger? posted by Coach JS

First, learn to recognize why the boy is out on the field. Did he ask to sign up? Or did mom and dad make him sign? There's 360 degrees of attitude difference there. You can make a tiger out of any kid that wants to play football just like you can make a lamb out of any kid that doesn't.

How do you make a lamb? Send a stud at him. Instant lamb. He didn't want to play and now he sees the very reason he didn't want to play coming at him. Survival instincts are for him to get out of there - And he will. Some are very good actors. I've seen Oscar winning performances by a kid flying in for the tackle who then barely misses. "Shucks, coach!" He says. "I missed!" Give him another 100 tries at that kid and he'll miss another hundred times, all with equal valor and effort. "Almost got him, coach." It's an act - And a very good one.

Some of these kids are so convincing you'll let 'em start on defense - for about three plays anyway before you see what you didn't want to see - his Oscar winning performance all over again. So you start with a player's motivation and then you look at his abilities. Kids who have motivation and want to play but have no talent or weigh 40 pounds are matched up against their physical equals. NEVER ALLOW A PHYSICAL MISMATCH.

In the demolition derby of football, you match your trucks against your trucks, your sportscars against your sportscars and your Volkswagen Beatles against other Beatles. Mismatches guarantee failure and promote fear in the inferior player. Neither one of those is fun. Create proper matches and then you avoid fear and failure and the kids focus on the drill instead of the opponent. Create an automatic, unthinking response of HIT. Shorten the distance between players (No time to think. Just react.).

Players should experience success at every drill. If "Fat Freddy" can't make a tackle, start reducing the runner's area until he can. This is how you work with the kids that WANT to play. Now you have to make allowances for the kid that wants to play, but doesn't want the position you gave him. Not many kids want to be on the line. They all want to be running backs. Some of these kids will not put in their effort at a position they don't want. Some will even lie down to force you to move them. These boys may want to play but they aren't at their position. They join the players of the second category - The ones who never wanted to play and were forced to sign up. This second group is handled slightly differently.

Where our previous enemies were fear and failure, our friends are aggression and success and - for the unhappy player - recognition. We're now talking Sumo drill. Nothing builds more aggression than Sumo but Sumo has to be handled carefully because Sumo also creates winners and losers and losing equates to failure. But, in the short term, the player who was unhappy with his position (i.e. our linemen) get to have fun, success, and recognition at the position they play. The lineman who was previously lying down ceases to lie down. Keep in mind that most lineman who want to be running backs want to star. I let them "star" as linemen by making the linemen who win the Sumo drill my offensive captains. "Stars" are those who get recognized. The team captain gets recognized.

So now the kid that wasn't trying at his lineman spot is now trying because he wants to be captain. No more lying down. But now we have to deal with the problem that Sumo also creates losers when all drills should create success. I create success from losing at the Sumo drill two different ways. First, the top half of the winners get to tennis ball drill the losers. The winners don't tennis ball drill. By tennis ball drilling the losers, the losers will catch up with the winners and become winners themselves.

If I tennis ball drilled the winners too, they'd stay ahead of the losers and the losers would remain losers. Losing equates to failure. Stay away from that. Make your losers into winners. Find a way for them to succeed and give them recognition when they do. When a kid makes it from the loser's circle to the winner's circle in Sumo, make a big deal out of it. Watch him stay there when you do. The others losers learn from his example. If he got in the winner's circle, why can't they? And, meanwhile, you're tennis ball drilling them into the winner's circle. They will know success. They will get there. Okay!

That brings us to the second way I build success out of Sumo losers. The last category of the "lambs" is the kid who you are certain could do better, but doesn't. He's too nice. He's too scatterbrained. He's too stupid. He's too unhappy. Who knows? He too something. Anyway, rather than spend a hundred hours in psycho therapy with the kid I apply the "ten second solution". When all else fails I get in his face and let him breath my breath as I ask him, "Are you gonna let everybody here push you all over this field? How long do you plan to do that? For the rest of your life? Now I know you can beat anybody here if you tried. You just don't try! Let's see what happens when you try!" Then I stand right behind him in Sumo drill and announce to him, in no uncertain terms, that, "If you go backwards on this drill this time, I'm gonna take my foot and boot your ass right over those goal posts and you'll be wearing my footprint on your butt for the rest of practice!"

Haven't had to lift my foot yet. BOOM! The other kid's on his butt. The kid is suddenly motivated. Now provide recognition. After all, 10 seconds ago you were publicly humiliating him so now you must make a public example of him by showing what happens when you try. Don't forget this last part or you can expect a telephone call from the league or a meeting with the kid's dad after practice.

Of course, you have to use the "10 second solution" with common sense. The kid can't weigh 45 pounds in a 110 pound league, be mentally retarded, or in a wheelchair. First, know there's nothing wrong with the kid that would prevent him from winning before applying it. You want the "10 second solution" to end in success - not failure. That brings us to the touchy issue of "running kids off".

I am opposed to running kids off and won't do it with any kid who tries. He can be a three legged Siamese twin who will put me in guaranteed last place and I won't run him off. I figure I can set aside one season of my life to give him the fun of a lifetime. But if the kid won't try and doesn't want to be there, then I don't want him there either. I'm not a baby sitting service. I give this type of player what they want - the opportunity to quit. That doesn't mean that I sic' the #1 stud on the team on him and beat him to death in practice.

I think any coach that has to resort to that to make a kid quit really doesn't have a kid that wants to quit, he just has a coach that wants to field his best 11. No. I just find a player that will embarrass him, not crush him, and match him up. Girls are great for this. You match a girl football player up against the team deadwood player and then you just let her kick his butt all the field - And then you never let him match up against anybody else. Just let her beat on him till he quits or gets better - His choice. But I don't let him get away from her.

After about three nights of having a girl thump his butt the deadwood is willing to turn in his gear. If no girl is available I would find the smallest, teeniest, tiniest tyke on the team and let him wail on this piece of deadwood. The message is the same. But in the big, overall picture I disapprove of the idea of running off a player if the purpose is to win. I'm a good enough coach that I don't need to do that and dislike, and love beating, those coaches who do.

But eventually, sooner or later, you'll get a kid who doesn't want to play football and doesn't want to learn. He's wasting your time and you're wasting his. If you've exhausted your options, time to go your separate ways. Now! How often has that actually happened? Well! I've coached 16 years. I can actually only remember sending one boy packing and I remember it because I used a girl to pack his bags for him.

I've probably done it some other time but just don't remember. Anyway, the vast majority of the time I find a way to get them to want to play and learn. You do that by creating a fun practice that creates success while eliminating fear. I stopped taking attendance at practice 5 years ago. Why? Because they were all there. Most of them beat me to the field. Lambs find ways to show up late or not at all. I feel I have no lambs and I have described why. However, what I have described is not how I turn my players into "tigers". That's an altogether different process.

The first step is to get them all there, conquer their fear, have their attention, and find ways to eliminate the deadwood. Once you have them all on the same page you proceed to the next level - which is making tigers out of pussycats.


A lamb to become a tiger? By DC
In Reply to: Re: A lamb to become a tiger? posted by ndestefano

That's a team concept, not an individual one. There are several factors in getting your team to play tough as nails. They are 1) by scheme 2) by speed 3) by technique 4) by drills 5) by reward and 6) by pride. A limited discussion of each follows:

By Scheme: Your offensive and defensive schemes must fit the abilities of your players. In a nutshell, do not place a player in an area that is bigger than he can either block or defend. Always make his assigned area small enough that he can't miss his assignment. If he is at risk of missing then his self confidence is tested every play. Uncertainty and doubt creates hesitation. Hesitation creates a miss. Make it so that little Joey Fudpucker isn't defending half the field or trying to center the ball and block a middle linebacker. Set the kid up for success in your schemes and not for failure. Quite often, failure is "area" related. He has to go too far and he's too slow. Once you place a player in the position to "blow it" you put him under mental and physical pressure not to. That pressure affects his game. He won't become a tiger. He'll stay a pussycat.

By Speed: Speed makes up for a lot of mistakes. It also allows a player to successfully block in, or defend in, a bigger area. I coach speed into my players. The faster they are the more they can dominate their assigned area. Confidence increases. Response intensifies.

By technique: This simply means that you have coached them properly to make a block or tackle and that they will do it automatically and without fear or thinking. The latter two create hesitation. The former (poor technique) means your pussycats won't become tigers because they weren't given the tools to get the job done.

By Drills: Your drills simulate a field situation for each individual player. Every player at every position should have to face, in practice, what he will face on the field on Saturday. An instruction, such as "Nobody gets behind you", is not a drill. If you don't want someone getting behind a certain player, then drill him at it. You have to drill every position - guard, tackle, NG, DE, etc. The drills must simulate as closely as possible a game situation. The drill merely forces the situation you want to test your player at to occur. No drill equals no test which equals uncertain outcome. If a kid hasn't been drilled at his position, do not expect him to perform like a tiger.

By Reward: Reward serves the purpose of getting the player to play his position your way and not his way. Find out what a player wants as a reward and then find a way to give it to him. Reward is a major factor when you inherit a losing football team or a very young team. If you inherit a team with a losing record, you also inherit a team with a losing attitude. As Vince Lombardi once said, "Winning is a habit. Unfortunately, so is losing." If you inherit a very young team, they could care less who wins the game. They just want to chase the ball. Very few 7-8's know who won the game they played in or what the score was their first time out. In both situations, a "winning habit" has not been established by you. So you offer a reward to get them in the habit of doing things your way.

Pride: Pride produces tigers. Wins produce pride. Shut out your first two opponents and you will almost certainly shut out all your opponents. Score all over your first two opponents and you will probably score all over everyone else too.

Why? Pride. If they've been knocking defenses back 10 yards on wedge, they will continue to do so. Their pride makes them believe they are unstoppable. Therefore, they won't be stopped. If they have a shut out streak going, their pride will cause them to want to maintain it. It becomes a personal goal to every player.

Each player draws the line - "You're not scoring on me." As an example, I went into my final regular season awhile back undefeated and unscored on. On the second to the last play of the game, they threw a totally lucky pass which included a great catch for the only TD we gave up that season. We won 28-6 and we're in first place for the playoffs but - Guess what? I have a kid bawling. Tears are everywhere. Why? Because he was covering the kid that made the touchdown catch. He blew our season shutout record. I could have cared less. I just wanted to win the game. But preserving the shutout was very important to him. BTW, he covered the kid perfectly. It wasn't his fault - but he didn't care. He just knew he was the one who blew the streak. You'd think his dog just died by the way he was blubbering and carrying on. But he, and his teammates, had developed winning habits and shutting out the other team was one of those habits.

Everyone of those kids on that team played like kamikazies on defense. They played way beyond their athletic ability. Pride goes a long ways towards winning games. A long time back I had a team that had gone to our league championship for five straight years. In year six though, the cupboard was bare of talent. They still won their first four games. Why? The pride of a winning tradition. In game five they came up against the league powerhouse and finally lost in triple overtime.

The coach for the team shakes my hand afterwards and tells me, "You and I have the best two teams. See you in the playoffs!" And I said, "No. You won't see me." Why? Because my kids had just learned they could be beaten. Their pride was gone. Without pride they had to play on talent - And they had no talent. They lost every game they played after that and I knew it was going to happen. I knew it from the moment they lost in overtime.

Hey! They shouldn't have won the first four. It took having somebody else let the air out of their tires for reality to set in. Anyone here who has seen a team play with more pride than talent has watched a battle take place out on the field. Its attack, charge, and countercharge, and they don't give up.

Anybody who watched the replay of the 1984 Orange Bowl last night got to witness an example of pride. Nebraska was undefeated and averaging 52 points a game coming in against Miami. Of course, Miami had Bernie Kosar, quite possibly the finest arm in football in the last 20 years. Nebraska got shredded 17-0 right off. Nebraska finally had to score on the "fumblerooskie" play (That should remind you guys of the game). It was a trick play but it restored Nebraska's pride and they proceeded to tie it back up 17-17 in short order (And then the battle began as both teams played with pride to create one of the great college games in history.). But the bottom line is, if your kids have pride in themselves, they will play like tigers.
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