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Author: Subject: O-line Blocking
tiger46
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[*] posted on 10-27-2009 at 11:29 AM Reply With Quote
O-line Blocking



Coaches,
Anyone ever train their O-linemen to watch the D-linemen’s feet? Or, at least, watch their legs from thighpad on down?
I’m still having issues with my linemen firing off at high angles or, even standing straight up. My team uses a recessed o-line. There’s usually at least 1yrd of separation between them and the d-line. I’ve noticed that the o-linemen are looking at the d-linemen’s faces and upper bodies. I’m thinking that if I train them to concentrate more on the d-linemen’s lower body, my o-line will stay low and deliver good drive blocks to the d-linemen’s hip pads/mid-sections like they’re supposed to do.
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Gumby_in_co
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[*] posted on 10-27-2009 at 11:52 AM Reply With Quote


Quote:
Originally posted by tiger46
Coaches,
Anyone ever train their O-linemen to watch the D-linemen’s feet? Or, at least, watch their legs from thighpad on down?
I’m still having issues with my linemen firing off at high angles or, even standing straight up. My team uses a recessed o-line. There’s usually at least 1yrd of separation between them and the d-line. I’ve noticed that the o-linemen are looking at the d-linemen’s faces and upper bodies. I’m thinking that if I train them to concentrate more on the d-linemen’s lower body, my o-line will stay low and deliver good drive blocks to the d-linemen’s hip pads/mid-sections like they’re supposed to do.


Our motto is "eyes to the thighs". We still get kids standing up from time to time, but when they're on, they absolutely crush their down blocks.
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tiger46
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[*] posted on 10-27-2009 at 02:36 PM Reply With Quote


Coach,

Thanks for the reply. Are there any special things that I need to be aware of to teach it? Or, do I just emphasize keeping 'eyes to the thighs'? I'm gathering ideas on what I want to stress as I teach it to them.
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Gumby_in_co
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[*] posted on 10-27-2009 at 02:51 PM Reply With Quote


Quote:
Originally posted by tiger46
Coach,

Thanks for the reply. Are there any special things that I need to be aware of to teach it? Or, do I just emphasize keeping 'eyes to the thighs'? I'm gathering ideas on what I want to stress as I teach it to them.


There's a ton of additional stuff. "Eyes to the thighs" is just what we use to get them to pick a low aiming point. We picked it up from a clinic by Phil Bravo of Monarch HS in Colorado. His linemen fire off so hard and low it's almost not fair.

Something else to try is the tennis ball drill. Simply drop a tennis ball from about 3 feet on cadence. The lineman has to bat or catch the ball on the first bounce, which on grass will be about 3-6 inches. Make sure he's using the footwork and hand/arm motion that you teach so he's not just diving at a tennis ball. To get that ball, he must be fast and low. The next progression is to bat the ball on the way to hitting a dummy.
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billmountjoy
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[*] posted on 10-27-2009 at 02:56 PM Reply With Quote


BLOCKING FUNDAMENTALS


STANCE:

Explosive and balanced to enable the blocker to move in four (4) directions with vertical leverage. Eyes are up (strain thru the eyebrows).


LANDMARK:

Point of aim, target. Area on defender to place the hands and direct the feet.


LEVERAGE:

A. Vertical: Pad under pad (PUP)
B. Horizontal: Lateral


FOOTWORK: (Step at landmark with vertical leverage).

A. First step = directional; playside – 6” step – step at the landmark. Adjust your first step to the horizontal alignment of the defender (I.E. width and depth).
B. Second step = quickness to get this step down to create power and suddenness.


HAND PLACEMENT:

Thumbs up with the elbows in tight to your framework.


FINISH!!!!!


BASE DRIVE BLOCK

PURPOSE:

A) Used at the P.O.A.
B) 1 on 1 block.
C) Take defender where he wants to go.
D) Get movement – sustain.
E) Back – option run.



1. Explode out.
2. Short first step (1/2 way to fingers of down hand; knee rolls over toe – NOT behind).
3. Back flat.
4. Bull neck.
5. Proper aiming point (aim face at throat of DLM; base of #’s of LB). Look the block in.
6. Second step MUST be beyond first step to win. Make contact on second step (most important step). Hit 1 yard through defender.
7. Whip the arms.
8. Blocking surface (drive the elbows inside & make contact with a triangle of hat & hands (thumbs up) to a lockout; contact the short ribs & “lift him out of his socks” on a 45 degree angle with fork lift motion.
9. Shoot the hips (unlock the power).
10. Driving steps.
11. Feet under you – good base.
12. Maintain contact.
13. 2nd & 3rd effort.

QUESTION: When do you whip the defender?
ANSWER: When he tries to escape the block – you come alive and finish (STAY ON BLOCK).




REACH BLOCK

PURPOSE: Used to prevent a defender a defender from escaping laterally to playside. Drive defender off the ball and reach him later.

1. Step up and out with the near foot.
2. A.P. = playside arm pit.
3. 2nd step bisect the crotch.
4. Inside hand to chest.
5. 3rd step – outside defender’s shoe and upfield.
6. Control the playside shoulder.
7. Knock defender off the ball – work to get hips square.
8. Footwork – 1, 2-3, 2-3.



CUTOFF BLOCK

PURPOSE: A backside block used to seal off lateral pursuit to the playside (example: outside zone block on play that will cut back).

1. Step up and out with near foot.
2. A.P. = playside number, arm pit, helmet in gap.
3. 2nd step bisect the crotch.
4. Dip and rip backside forearm through playside number (inside hand to chest). You use shoulder & forearm, OR hat & hands to a lock-out.
5. Work to stay square.
6. Good head and neck squeeze.
7. Work defender upfield.
8. Prevent defender from crossing your face (IT IS A “PRIDE” BLOCK)!



DOWN BLOCK

PURPOSE: Stop penetration and prevent defender from escaping laterally by blocking him from outside-in.

1. Step with near foot – for far heel of opponent.
2. A.P. = the nose of your helmet for the near tip of his shoulder pad, hip, or belt buckle (belt buckle if expecting penetration; or hip if he’s fighting outside; or near tip of shoulder pad when you don’t know what he is going to do).
3. Strike – inside hand to chest (stops penetration) and outside hand to just above bicep.
4. Must control the near shoulder and keep a good base.
5. If penetrator:
- aim for belt buckle
- lift near shoulder

If reader: control near shoulder

If spinner: - work defender upfield
- control near shoulder

If he aligns off ball
- put ear on near hip and wall off



LINEBACKER FLOW BLOCK

PURPOSE: Used to prevent a Lber from escaping laterally to the playside.

1. Good route.
2. A.P. = playside number (Inside Zone), and outside armpit (Outside Zone).
3. Dip before contact.
4. Use running drive block (Inside Zone), or running reach block (Outside Zone).
5. Finish with hips square.
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markhansen
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[*] posted on 10-29-2009 at 07:31 PM Reply With Quote


Quote:
Originally posted by Gumby_in_co
There's a ton of additional stuff. "Eyes to the thighs" is just what we use to get them to pick a low aiming point. We picked it up from a clinic by Phil Bravo of Monarch HS in Colorado. His linemen fire off so hard and low it's almost not fair.


Well that grabs my attention. What else did you learn from them?
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splicedragon
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[*] posted on 10-29-2009 at 10:45 PM Reply With Quote


I too use eyes to the thighs, and thats where I tell my linemen to hit. I've been using this for a couple of years now as most of the defensive linemen we play against come up or stand straight up. It's an easy target to hit.
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Gumby_in_co
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[*] posted on 10-30-2009 at 01:14 AM Reply With Quote


Quote:
Originally posted by markhansen
Quote:
Originally posted by Gumby_in_co
There's a ton of additional stuff. "Eyes to the thighs" is just what we use to get them to pick a low aiming point. We picked it up from a clinic by Phil Bravo of Monarch HS in Colorado. His linemen fire off so hard and low it's almost not fair.


Well that grabs my attention. What else did you learn from them?


We had 3 hours with Coach Bravo. He used to coach with Don Markham and Jerry Valloton (The Toss). To hear him tell it, all three were instrumental in the development of the modern DW.

He had a deceptively simple power blocking scheme. Against certain fronts, unconditional down block. To get his doubles, the Guard and Tackle would simply point to a defender and say "double". The teams he plays against tend to figure out his "rules" and get a big body inside shade of the TE, then stunt a LB around the WB, who is helping the TE. He had an adjustment for that, but I can't quite remember it.

His blocking technique for youth was simple too. "Eyes to the thighs". First step is what he calls a "power" step, 6" in the direction of your angle block. 2nd step is a 6" "replacement step". Back should be flat (parallel to the ground). He doesn't care what they do with their arms. Just make contact and get in the defender's way. He bird dogs those first two steps every day for 20 minutes. It's a "step-freeze" progression. If they mess up at any point, he starts them over.

He works with all the youth coaches that feed his school, so they all run a youth DW. When they come to him, it's about refinement instead of installation.

I'll have to try and find my notes and post them.
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Gumby_in_co
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[*] posted on 10-30-2009 at 01:15 AM Reply With Quote


Quote:
Originally posted by markhansen
Quote:
Originally posted by Gumby_in_co
There's a ton of additional stuff. "Eyes to the thighs" is just what we use to get them to pick a low aiming point. We picked it up from a clinic by Phil Bravo of Monarch HS in Colorado. His linemen fire off so hard and low it's almost not fair.


Well that grabs my attention. What else did you learn from them?


We had 3 hours with Coach Bravo. He used to coach with Don Markham and Jerry Valloton (The Toss). To hear him tell it, all three were instrumental in the development of the modern DW.

He had a deceptively simple power blocking scheme. Against certain fronts, unconditional down block. To get his doubles, the Guard and Tackle would simply point to a defender and say "double". The teams he plays against tend to figure out his "rules" and get a big body inside shade of the TE, then stunt a LB around the WB, who is helping the TE. He had an adjustment for that, but I can't quite remember it.

His blocking technique for youth was simple too. "Eyes to the thighs". First step is what he calls a "power" step, 6" in the direction of your angle block. 2nd step is a 6" "replacement step". Back should be flat (parallel to the ground). He doesn't care what they do with their arms. Just make contact and get in the defender's way. He bird dogs those first two steps every day for 20 minutes. It's a "step-freeze" progression. If they mess up at any point, he starts them over.

He works with all the youth coaches that feed his school, so they all run a youth DW. When they come to him, it's about refinement instead of installation.

I'll have to try and find my notes and post them.
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mdgsrg
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[*] posted on 10-30-2009 at 02:37 AM Reply With Quote


Eye to the thigh. Wow old school! I have struggled the last 5 years to incorporate eye to the thigh and "use your hands" it's legal. This is my first fo around with youth. next time it will be eye to the thigh. Use your hands leads to non-aggresiveness. It's impossible to tell who will be the best high school lineman in the early years. Lets teach them to be physical and tough early and let them learn finess later!

Caoch Mike
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billmountjoy
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[*] posted on 11-1-2009 at 07:54 PM Reply With Quote


From coaching on 3 levels (4 if you count 1 year in Youth League) I have found the following to be true: The PUNCH with the hands in the chest can "STUN" a defender more than shoulder or flipper blocks. It is especially important IF you run Inside & Outside Zone. ALSO - in Pass Pro.

Read exerpt from this article of a few years back (this is absolutely the most important BLOCKING coaching point I have ever come across, & USED in my career): The great Joe Jacoby - member of the famous Redskins "HOGS" (in 4 Super Bowls) came to our school last July to put on a CLINIC on this:

ARTICLE: "Bugel's current and former players believe his success stems from masterful motivational skills, communication ability and teaching acumen. Returning Redskins say they have improved markedly through Bugel's emphasis on hand techniques to hinder defenders.

Last season, Thomas, a gifted athlete who is agile despite his 6-foot-5, 306-pound frame, relied on a flawed blocking method -- blocking wide, with his hands several inches apart. It left Thomas' chest open to defenders, making him more vulnerable. A lineman has more control over the defender by keeping his hands close together inside the chest area -- "tight hands," Bugel explained -- before punching out.

The Redskins also have incorporated one of Bugel's trademark techniques: the arm pump, which is used in run blocking. The lineman cocks, or pumps, his arms to his sides before forcefully pushing upward -- "like a fork lift," Bugel said -- into the defender's chest area. It diminishes the chances of holding and keeps the lineman from being passive.

"He wants us to hit 'em in the chest and make their heartbeat stop," Thomas said. "It stuns them at the line because the defense is taught to hit you in your chest, so it's better if you hit them first."

Bugel used imaginary handcuffs, teaching his players through repetition and constant reminders. Thomas, a sixth-year veteran, had previously known a similar technique but stopped using it last season because it wasn't emphasized. Samuels, who is coming off perhaps his worst NFL season, picked up damaging tendencies in recent years -- dropping his head and using his hands improperly".

PS: How to DRILL it:

“2 MAN BULL SLED DRILL” = Teach how to be explosive. 2 step blow delivery (don’t drive the sled after second step until you get GOOD on the BLOW). Parallel stance – frontal position – step – blow delivery. OVER EXAGGERAGE use of fists or heels of hands (with thumbs on top) by taking first directional step & second step is 100% BLOW DELIVERY – throw arms out of sockets on first step (wind up with elbows back for good arm thrust) – second step hit & lift sled up in air.
"IF YOU DON'T WIN THE START - YOU CAN'T WIN THE FINISH"!

billmountjoy@yahoo.com
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