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Author: Subject: OL blocking
defensewins
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[*] posted on 4-28-2007 at 11:35 PM Reply With Quote
OL blocking



What block to you teach first each year? What is your progression? How do you teach each block?

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[*] posted on 4-29-2007 at 06:40 AM Reply With Quote


If I had players like that it wouldnt matter



Im back
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[*] posted on 4-29-2007 at 09:53 AM Reply With Quote


I always start out as if my guys know nothing and go from square 1. Stance, aiming point, steps, fit, and drive. I always start with the basic drive block, then install down block, pulling, cut-off, combo, double team, then zone principals if I get the idea that the particular group can handle it. We gradually introduce fold schemes (Charlie, Gus, Tom, Ed, Ted) and teach the linemen when it appropriate to call it. Pass blocking is the last thing we install...we don't throw much, and when we do it is mostly play action, with man blocking playside and hinge protection backside.

I make a lot of use of a 2 x10 x10 boards during the early going when teaching the drive block. It is a little wide for some, but in reinforces the need for a wide base during the drive block. We will drive a heavy standup dummy held by a coach the length of the board...Step on the board, you get to go again.

A lot of youth coaches frown on the drive block, but in my experience a kid with halfway decent athletic talent can learn to be an effective drive blocker.

I find, much to my chagrin, that the lower levels in our organization do not teach the linemen much other than block the guy in front of you. So I end up having to fix lots of bad habits. Poor stances, looking at the guy you are going to block, taking the back side of a play off, initial pop with no leg drive, leading with the wrong foot, and my pet peeve, backside TE blocking backside DE!. Never can figure that out.
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[*] posted on 4-29-2007 at 08:15 PM Reply With Quote


We do it the same way mrice described, basically the bird dog drill. Last year we also worked on six point explosion to teach placement of the hands and the importance of firing the hips at contact. After the bird dog drill and six point drill, we worked on the seven man sled or two man sled.

Last year, we did not do live board drills and it was a mistake. We are adding that piece back in to increase intensity. Our blocking circuit this year will be 6 pt explosion, 4 pt explosion, bird dog drill, and board drills.




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[*] posted on 4-30-2007 at 07:31 AM Reply With Quote


JrTitan, what are the 6pt and 4pt explosion drills?
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[*] posted on 4-30-2007 at 09:00 AM Reply With Quote


1st is the stance

2nd is the basic blocking progression we use (LEG)

3rd LEG in a drive block - found that drive blocking is a waste of time but it is our teaching base

4th TKO, WEDGE, and PIN blocking schemes and there variations.

5th Improve on technique and execution

Jack




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[*] posted on 4-30-2007 at 09:39 AM Reply With Quote


Coach Gregory,

LEG? I'm so out of the loop... but at least I'm learning a lot.
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[*] posted on 4-30-2007 at 12:39 PM Reply With Quote


It is our blocking progression.

I used to use BEEF but it was to much for some of my kids to grasp.

L - Load the body
E - Explode into the defender
G- Get to your landmark

It is our simple blocking progression to teach footwork and body technique.

BEEF (before you ask)

B- Blast off
E- Explode
E- Elevate (Explode in LEG is Elevate and Explode)
F - Finish off

Jack




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[*] posted on 4-30-2007 at 03:50 PM Reply With Quote


Quote:
Originally posted by JrTitan
Our blocking circuit this year will be 6 pt explosion, 4 pt explosion, bird dog drill, and board drills.



Does anyone have any detailed instructions on how to run these drills?
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[*] posted on 4-30-2007 at 03:54 PM Reply With Quote


Quote:
Originally posted by coachgregory

3rd LEG in a drive block - found that drive blocking is a waste of time but it is our teaching base

Jack



If drive blocking is a waste of time for the youth level (7-9's) then what would be a good alternative for the DC Wing T and GOL blocking rules?
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[*] posted on 4-30-2007 at 04:19 PM Reply With Quote


6 point explosion-hands, knees, feet (6-points)

Basically you are your hands and knees and on the count punch and extend on the bag, dummy, shield, etc.

4 point explosion, essentially the same thing, but not on hands (just knees/feet) and explode into the bad, dummy shield,etc.

Bird-Dog, basically walking through the progression. A type of slow-mo if you will.

Board drills-going through your blocking progression using boards. It helps emphasize the width of the OL's feet.

That is a quick response, but all I have time for right now.
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[*] posted on 4-30-2007 at 08:44 PM Reply With Quote


Quote:
Originally posted by Keith


If drive blocking is a waste of time for the youth level (7-9's) then what would be a good alternative for the DC Wing T and GOL blocking rules?


From what I have been able to glean from studying the DC Wing T, there is not a lot of need for one-on-one drive blocking in his system. In fact, the parent offense, the Delaware Wing T, also minimizes the one-on-one drive blocks and makes use of a lot of angle blocking and combo blocking.

Of course, the drive block is still the normal base block at the point-of-attack, but with the uncovered adjacent lineman going "Hip-to-Hip" en-route to a backer, or the motion back tracking through the down lineman to the backer, the effect is that of a double team, the post-lead of the Delaware.
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[*] posted on 5-1-2007 at 06:28 AM Reply With Quote


As MRICE explained the Wing-T is a down scheme. The base blocking is always the drive block but I use it has a base of teaching and not for actual use on the field. A drive block requires that everyone of your linemen are bigger, stronger, and more agile, and use good techinque against their opponent to be consistantly successful. If you have two 100lb linemenj facing each other and they both have the same speed and techinque that equals to a stalemate and in my opinion a stalemate at the LOS is a win for the defense. So I use angle blocks because you now get a force vector advantage. Any block at an angle on an opponent is now mulitplying the blocker's weight (depending on the angle x1.5 to x4 with x4 being a trap block). So that 100lb kid using good techinque and getting off the ball in the track will be at 150 to 200lb of blocking vice 100lbs. That to me is a big advantage when you have a smaller line.

Jack




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[*] posted on 5-1-2007 at 07:20 AM Reply With Quote


Quote:
Originally posted by coachgregory
As MRICE explained the Wing-T is a down scheme. The base blocking is always the drive block but I use it has a base of teaching and not for actual use on the field. A drive block requires that everyone of your linemen are bigger, stronger, and more agile, and use good techinque against their opponent to be consistantly successful. If you have two 100lb linemenj facing each other and they both have the same speed and techinque that equals to a stalemate and in my opinion a stalemate at the LOS is a win for the defense. So I use angle blocks because you now get a force vector advantage. Any block at an angle on an opponent is now mulitplying the blocker's weight (depending on the angle x1.5 to x4 with x4 being a trap block). So that 100lb kid using good techinque and getting off the ball in the track will be at 150 to 200lb of blocking vice 100lbs. That to me is a big advantage when you have a smaller line.

Jack


Coach Gregory,

I do not have the experience you do as a coach, but in my limited time with youth, the one thing you cannot underestimate is desire. I have seen a 150 pound kid mow over a 275 pound kid because he was more aggressive. We use base blocks in our scheme, but also double teams. Regardless what scheme you use somewhere, sometime that kid is going to have to know how to block someone one on one.
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[*] posted on 5-1-2007 at 08:17 AM Reply With Quote


Quote:
Originally posted by Keith
Does anyone have any detailed instructions on how to run these drills?


Explosion Drill: Six Points
The offensive lineman is in a six-point stance (feet, knees, and hands on the ground). You want the OL to be rocked back in his six-point stance to the point where his butt is almost on his heels. On the HUT the OL explodes into the bag/sled. The hands must extend and you should see the hips thrust out (eventually down into the ground) and the chest should be up. The OL will finish this drill face down on the ground fully extended.

Explosion Drill: Four Point
The offensive lineman is in a four-point stance (feet and hands on the ground). You want the OL to be rocked back in the stance as must as possible. On the HUT the OL explodes into the bag/sled. You want to see the hands extended, chest out, and the hips being thrust out (eventually down into the ground). The OL will finish this drill face down on the ground fully extended. This is not a "bring your feet drill", but instead is simply an explosion drill.

Bird Dog
We work first step, second step (fit), and finish. These can be done on bags or sled. The first step is the short power step (work both feet). We punch on the second step and get into our fit position - the face mask right in the chest ("bite the string"), forward body lean, and both hands have inside leverage while being placed in the numbers. On the finish, we explode the hips and drive. I like to do these on big bags and using 1x10, 1x8 or1x6 boards (depending on your age group) to make sure they are keeping a wide base

Board Drill
Using the same boards in the bird dog drill, line up two lineman facing each our. Each attempts to drive the other off the board. Run this drill at rapid fire pace with high intensity.




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[*] posted on 5-1-2007 at 09:14 AM Reply With Quote


Quote:
Originally posted by GoMavs
Quote:
Originally posted by coachgregory
As MRICE explained the Wing-T is a down scheme. The base blocking is always the drive block but I use it has a base of teaching and not for actual use on the field. A drive block requires that everyone of your linemen are bigger, stronger, and more agile, and use good techinque against their opponent to be consistantly successful. If you have two 100lb linemenj facing each other and they both have the same speed and techinque that equals to a stalemate and in my opinion a stalemate at the LOS is a win for the defense. So I use angle blocks because you now get a force vector advantage. Any block at an angle on an opponent is now mulitplying the blocker's weight (depending on the angle x1.5 to x4 with x4 being a trap block). So that 100lb kid using good techinque and getting off the ball in the track will be at 150 to 200lb of blocking vice 100lbs. That to me is a big advantage when you have a smaller line.

Jack


Coach Gregory,

I do not have the experience you do as a coach, but in my limited time with youth, the one thing you cannot underestimate is desire. I have seen a 150 pound kid mow over a 275 pound kid because he was more aggressive. We use base blocks in our scheme, but also double teams. Regardless what scheme you use somewhere, sometime that kid is going to have to know how to block someone one on one.



Coach that is a great point but I want consistency across my entire line. When I teach a scheme with all things being EQUAL I want my line to be successful. This is just my opinion but DRIVE BLOCKING does not equate to CONSISTANT SUCCESS because you have to many factors that can affect that success. I realize that everyone HOPES that their linemen have the DESIRE to get off the ball and get on that block but that doesn't always happen every paly at every position. I would rather have a scheme in place that ensured with things not being equal that my players can still be successful that in itself builds confidence. What if that 275lb kid was athletically equal to your 150lb kid (I doubt he was based on your example) and had the same desire...you think you would have had that same success? I don't want to guess if I am...so my schemes are based on giving my kids having an advantages at the LOS through scheme and technique. I have never ever seen a base blocking team that had average linemen be successful anywhere and at any level I have coached. I have seen teams with entire front seven of stud linemen be successful but how many of us get that?

One more thing - we make blocks one - on - one we just block with an angle (down) instead of having our linemen take a head up drive block. Thus we get a force multiplier without the double team...now because of the schemes we use we often get double, triple, and even 7 on 1 match ups (wedge) but they are all at angles...

Just my opinion so take it for what it is worth. I understand your point but I want a scheme in place that gives me a force and technique advantage and a drive block does neither IMO.

Jack




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[*] posted on 5-1-2007 at 09:35 AM Reply With Quote


I second Coach Gregory's opinion on this issue. Desire is great, and I tell my guys that blocking is aobut 75% desire and 25% technique. But there comes a point where all the desire and technique in the world cannot overcome physics. As a 225 pound tackle at CMU, I had the technique to take on Mean Joe Greene, and the desire to block Mean Joe Greene, but Mean Joe would have had me by about 50 pounds, was a lot stronger than me, and twice the athlete. So fortunately for me, I never had the chance and am still alive today to teach!

College I formation teams have the ability to recruit the very best offensive linemen in the country to run their base drive blocking schemes. Southern Cal was famous for this. However, Ron Yary and Anthony Munoz do not play for me. Not to mention the fact that these days with the zone schemes being in vogue, few enough of them are relying on "knock the defensive line 3 yards off the ball" tactics even if they have the horses to do it.

Assume prior to every game that your O-linemen are not as good as the defensive players they will face, and design your blocking to maximize leverage in the form of down blocking, fold schemes, trapping and double teams and you will be ahead of the game. If you decide to go with a power game, remember the old single wing principals of a double team and kickout at the point of attackare time proven, sound football concepts. If you happen to have a great drive blocker at the point of attack, the double team guy can always chip off and pick up a scraping backer.
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[*] posted on 5-1-2007 at 09:47 AM Reply With Quote


I am not professing the merits of an all base blocking system. We have some instances where based on scheme it becomes necessary for a kid to use a base/drive block. My only point is that Coach Gregory, by teaching the base technique, is serving his kids in the long run because somewhere, sometime, they are going to be going one on one. I just don't see how that is preventable.

Of course I don't believe every 150 pound kid will rule a 275 kid. I actually think my case is a rare case of a talented 150lb kid (a TE) going against a softer 275 lb kid. My only point is desire and aggression (maturity) on a youth level can be an equalizer moreso than on a high school or college level. Basically biggest doesn't always equal best. Separate point from drive blocking.
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[*] posted on 5-1-2007 at 09:55 AM Reply With Quote


Quote:
Originally posted by coachmrice
I second Coach Gregory's opinion on this issue. Desire is great, and I tell my guys that blocking is aobut 75% desire and 25% technique. But there comes a point where all the desire and technique in the world cannot overcome physics. As a 225 pound tackle at CMU, I had the technique to take on Mean Joe Greene, and the desire to block Mean Joe Greene, but Mean Joe would have had me by about 50 pounds, was a lot stronger than me, and twice the athlete. So fortunately for me, I never had the chance and am still alive today to teach!

College I formation teams have the ability to recruit the very best offensive linemen in the country to run their base drive blocking schemes. Southern Cal was famous for this. However, Ron Yary and Anthony Munoz do not play for me. Not to mention the fact that these days with the zone schemes being in vogue, few enough of them are relying on "knock the defensive line 3 yards off the ball" tactics even if they have the horses to do it.

Assume prior to every game that your O-linemen are not as good as the defensive players they will face, and design your blocking to maximize leverage in the form of down blocking, fold schemes, trapping and double teams and you will be ahead of the game. If you decide to go with a power game, remember the old single wing principals of a double team and kickout at the point of attackare time proven, sound football concepts. If you happen to have a great drive blocker at the point of attack, the double team guy can always chip off and pick up a scraping backer.


Almost every play we run includes double teams, down schemes, or traps. Eventually though, our kids have to know the principles of how to drive a defender off the ball. Even a double team is two guys doing a base drive block. A down block is a drive block from an angle. A trap block is a drive block with a running head start. All the same principles essentially. The initial steps may be different, but the end result is we want controlled movement (as in not getting shucked aside) of defenders.
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[*] posted on 5-1-2007 at 11:03 AM Reply With Quote


Coach,

As I stated before the DRIVE block is the bases of our teaching. So everyone of our kids (that includes my backs) know how to make a drive block due to fundamentals we practice every day...they will simply never use one in a game while they play for me. One of the many reasons we do this is to teach them that the schemes we use give them an advantage and they see this day in and day out in practice.

I define a drive block as a HEAD UP MAN ON BLOCK.

I simply use angles and wedge principles in all of my schemes to eliminate drive blocks.

As far as preparing kids for the next level...teach them a solid stance, teach them a blocking progression, and teach them to play with intensity. If you do that your kids will be very successful. I want them to be successful now in my system...not really worried about how successful a coach on the next level is that is the next level coaches job.

Jack




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[*] posted on 5-1-2007 at 12:48 PM Reply With Quote


Quote:
Originally posted by coachgregory
Coach,

As I stated before the DRIVE block is the bases of our teaching. So everyone of our kids (that includes my backs) know how to make a drive block due to fundamentals we practice every day...they will simply never use one in a game while they play for me. One of the many reasons we do this is to teach them that the schemes we use give them an advantage and they see this day in and day out in practice.

I define a drive block as a HEAD UP MAN ON BLOCK.

I simply use angles and wedge principles in all of my schemes to eliminate drive blocks.

As far as preparing kids for the next level...teach them a solid stance, teach them a blocking progression, and teach them to play with intensity. If you do that your kids will be very successful. I want them to be successful now in my system...not really worried about how successful a coach on the next level is that is the next level coaches job.

Jack


I don't really want to start a "prepared for the next level" debate. I already know that I disagree with most youth coaches on messageboards about this topic. It does seem to be a rather sensitive subject in general.

I thought I was complementing the fact that you teach the drive block as in my opinion, it is the basis for every other type of block. Good body position, driving feet, etc are the same no matter what angle you are coming from. I don't see my thoughts as being against yours?
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[*] posted on 5-1-2007 at 02:16 PM Reply With Quote


I don't think that GoMavs and Coach Gregory are in disgreement at all. In Coach Gregory's system, there is not much call for straight-ahead drive blocking. He is a proponent of SAB in his DW, whereas I taught it Wyatt style, more Delaware rules than anything else. But as he stated, he teaches the drive block as a starting point, a "base" from which to build other techniques more suitable to his philosophy and system.

I am of the same mindset. The base drive block is what I teach, but maybe 25 percent of the kids I get are athletic enough to succeed with it on a consistent basis. We have weight restrictions, and invariably the ones that can do it end up playing a skill position in High School. The typical "Fat Freddy" as he is called on this forum has little chance of being successful at it, but we still teach it as a fundamental aspect of the game. But, after they have gotten a feel for what it takes to root a guy out in a heads-up, one on one situation, we tell them to keep the techniques in mind, but now we are going to show you how to take advantage of angles. So now comes the introduction of the proper technique for down blocking, folding, trapping, etc.
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[*] posted on 5-1-2007 at 06:44 PM Reply With Quote


I have to laugh because the coach that had the best offensive line at Jack Gregory's 2006 DW Symposium ran straight ahead drive blocks (He sat at your dinner table, Jack). This coach didn't even need plays. He didn't need backs. The line pulverized everything in front of them. I have never seen such a dominating line. I couldn't even tell you what this coach talked about but I wish he had talked about his line. IMPRESSIVE!

I coach drive blocking as my base block although only about two kids will actually use it on a play (The others crab or execute the "OL" of GOL.). I teach it because all kids can get fairly good with it fairly fast and, in my case, I get very little practice time to get a team ready. And, although another poster thought differently, "big and slow" kids prefer this block to most any other you can teach.

Now I happen to be very precise on how to teach it and emphasize proper fireoff. My guys take out the other guys. That's not because my guys are great. It reflects my priorities. I make certain I coach the "bottom guys" on my team. A very high percentage of my opponents don't do that. They coach their studs. Their defensive linemen are taught how to tackle and where to line up. That's about it. Most stand up on snap. So my guys take out their guys and we do it, I'd say, close to 100% of the time.

There's another reason why my opponents don't teach the defenders to "read the hats" of their blockers. That's because youth offensive lines are very sloppy in execution. They'll make a drive block without any regard for where the runner is going. Thus, they'll step off on the wrong foot and put their helmet on the wrong side of the defender. If a defender tries to read that, he'll step the wrong way. So the defender can't be taught to read a drive block until the offense learns to give a good read. That could take years.

Even if they did train their line to read my line, it wouldn't do them any good. True, against an "Okie" trained defender, my drive block success rate is only about 50%. That still doesn't matter. 50% is still 100% if the runner is trained to cut off his blocker. So, even if my blocker is beat, the defender still misses. Drive blocks can work well against a defender in space.

We can also "seal" a defender being drive blocked at the POA with an outside man. Again, 50% becomes 100%. We also never drive block a hole with two defenders over it (We "cross" block it or "trap" it). If they put defenders in the gaps, we block down and go outside.

My point here isn't to make any great claims about the block other than to note it's time efficiency for installation. It's actually "dinosaur" football. It's outdated. But, when my opponent stands up as my boy fires out low, it's still "brand new" to that defender. Or when my guards pull in front of a 5-2 LBer not trained to read guards, it's still brand new to him. And when we trap a kid coming hard across the LOS, I'll bet I can trap the same kid the very next play. He's not trained to even recognize it, let alone deal with it. It's "brand new"to him, too. My view is to coach what the defense isn't ready for and not anything more or anything less. I'll give them the best drive block they've seen all season one play and a different block the next (Combo, trap, wedge, cross). If you can install your blocking systems faster than the other guy can teach how to defend them, you win.

Coach to the level of your competition.
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[*] posted on 5-1-2007 at 07:29 PM Reply With Quote


SO, the question is, How much time do you guys spend with your Oline and DLine?? We spend a good majority of our practice time in the begining teach the OLine and DLine, as the season went on we moved on we spent less time with them and more time with the "skill position" players. THIS WAS A HUGE MISTAKE!!! I just watched our last game on film again, and I noticed that our blocking was sloppy as our Oline decided to stop firing out and raised up insstead. Our Dline was even worse. I watched my Dline get pushed back 5+yards every play. It was embarrassing!!
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[*] posted on 5-2-2007 at 07:20 AM Reply With Quote


Our O-line gets 30 minutes of technique work everyday. Our DL gets about 20 minutes every day. Well not every day, we practice 3 days a week for 2 hours a practice.
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[*] posted on 5-2-2007 at 08:14 AM Reply With Quote


DC,

Great points as always. I think we discussed this at the DWS with Dave Potter. I coach the oline and I really put a lot of emphasis on team blocking. We have block and tackle every practice and we spend a good portion of time stressing line play because it will win a lot of games for you.

I don't recall who you are talking about... How are things going for you? Are you coaching a team this year?

Jack




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[*] posted on 5-2-2007 at 08:56 AM Reply With Quote


Quote:
Originally posted by coachgregory
It is our blocking progression.

L - Load the body
E - Explode into the defender
G- Get to your landmark

Jack


Jack and other Blocing experts,

For us "extreme" coaching novices, do you have any more detail on each of the:

Load the body - is this the 1st small step with playside foot staying low, and then getting hands into position for contact?

Explode into the defender - is this the 2nd step (power step) and then positioning hands on defender's chest plate and lifiting?

Get to your landmark - is this driving the defender out of or away from the hole?

Thanks in advance!!
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[*] posted on 5-2-2007 at 09:03 AM Reply With Quote


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Originally posted by dalasbob
SO, the question is, How much time do you guys spend with your Oline and DLine?? We spend a good majority of our practice time in the begining teach the OLine and DLine, as the season went on we moved on we spent less time with them and more time with the "skill position" players. THIS WAS A HUGE MISTAKE!!! I just watched our last game on film again, and I noticed that our blocking was sloppy as our Oline decided to stop firing out and raised up insstead. Our Dline was even worse. I watched my Dline get pushed back 5+yards every play. It was embarrassing!!



30 minutes per practice with each of them.
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[*] posted on 5-2-2007 at 09:07 AM Reply With Quote


Quote:
Originally posted by mrice

From what I have been able to glean from studying the DC Wing T, there is not a lot of need for one-on-one drive blocking in his system. In fact, the parent offense, the Delaware Wing T, also minimizes the one-on-one drive blocks and makes use of a lot of angle blocking and combo blocking.



DC and others, please correct me if I am wrong,

In the DC Wing T, I believe the only time a "head up" drive block would be performed would be where the DG or DT are lined up On the OG and OT.

Otherwise, the DG and/or DT would be in a gap and then an easier "angle" block would be performed. This would still be a drive block but from an angle allowing better leverage on the defender.

Also, the uncovered OG and/or OT will have to make blocks on the LBs. My thoughts are to have the OG and/or OT line up in the same stance as the player they are going to block. If it is a LB, then they will line up i a 2pt stance and perform kind of a "stalk" block where they simply fire out and try to get there body between the LB and the hole called. They would essentially just have to shield the LB from the ball carrier until the whistle blows.


Your thoughts are all welcome.
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[*] posted on 5-2-2007 at 10:06 AM Reply With Quote


Quote:
Originally posted by Keith
Quote:
Originally posted by coachgregory
It is our blocking progression.

L - Load the body
E - Explode into the defender
G- Get to your landmark

Jack


Jack and other Blocing experts,

For us "extreme" coaching novices, do you have any more detail on each of the:

Load the body - is this the 1st small step with playside foot staying low, and then getting hands into position for contact?

Explode into the defender - is this the 2nd step (power step) and then positioning hands on defender's chest plate and lifiting?

Get to your landmark - is this driving the defender out of or away from the hole?

Thanks in advance!!


The way we teach Drive Blocking (hands blocking team)is the following:

1. Good Stance-feet shoulder width or slightly wider for some. Not too much weight on the hands, not too much weight back. This can be tested by "sweeping" the hand (if they fall on their face, too much weight is forward in my opinion) while in their stance, or by pushing on their shoulders trying to "rock" them backwards.

2. Position step-a 6 inch mostly lateral step that allows the blocker to get in proper squared position with the defender. The blocker's demeanor (body position) should be in the power position (think short-stop in base ball, LB stance, etc.) with his hands in the "cocked" position. We describe it like a cowboy reaching for his guns. It is very important that the player doesn't stand up here. Body position is something we emphasize because if you stand up you lose leverage and leg power.

3. Second Step-I can't not overemphasize the quickness of this step. It has to be lightening quick, or the closest your player can get to it. It is a short power step towards roughly the midline of the defender. This is the step where we draw and fire our "guns" into the defender's breast plate. We try to emphasize that the "punch" is a VIOLENT movement and we have to punch like we are trying to go through the defender's chest. It essential, in my opinion, to keep elbows in and thumbs up. From the "cocked" position, this will require a slight roll of the forearms, but the thumbs should be straight up like you are trying to shake hands with both hands. A good punch should jar the head and shoulders of the defender and stand the defender up. This stopping of his momentum along with the next step should move the defender backwards.

4-Hips and feet drive-We choose to teach short choppy under control steps. These steps are as rapid fire as the player can handle. I think we differ from a lot of coaches because our O-lineman aren't on their toes, but more flat footed. We do this so our blocker has better control and doesn't get thrown on their faces. It is important that during the drive, you roll your hips forward and never stop moving your feet. If your punch was successful, it stop or stunned the defenders momentum. With your hips and leg drive, you now should create his momentum going backwards.


That is how we teach base blocking. I think it may differ a lot from how some other coaches do it, but we have had good success with it thus far.

Also, this is the first time I have ever tried to write it out, so if i missed something, or you have questions, let me know.
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[*] posted on 5-2-2007 at 11:14 AM Reply With Quote


Excerpt from my new Playbook - 2nd Edition Triple B Playbook -

Teaching The All Important First Three Steps (L.E.G):

I am a firm believer that every play is won on the first two steps that the offensive line makes. If the offensive line can get those first two steps down before the defense does and can execute them to near perfection then there is a very good chance that the play is not only going to succeed but will also net the offense a great deal of positive yards. The below information goes over how to not only teach the first two steps but the first three steps and how to use the body to maximize all the power in the blocker as well as get the most out of the angles at the point of attack. This system of teaching is applied to every scheme we use but the wedge and wall schemes.

L.E.G FOOTWORK

Footwork:
The foot should land flat, meaning all seven cleats hit the ground while taking these steps. Literally stomping the ground as the blocker moves down his assigned path or to the target.

• L – Load Step
• E – Explode Step
• G – Go Step
• Run your feet!!!

L - We call the first step the LOAD STEP as they have to get that foot up and down fast (literally stomp the ground). This step is the step nearest the blocking path (track, assignment, defender) and is a fast short step while staying low (head up, chest on knee). The back should not rise up at all on this step. The step should be no longer then six inches so tell them three inches and you will get six. You must load your arms on this step quickly (thumbs behind the hips as you cock your arms back at 90 degrees). You must explode out of your stance and into this step with great force.

E - The next step we call the EXPLODE STEP, as that is the back foot taking a short power step down the blocking path to the base/landmark. Starting low, the back should rise as the feet, ankles, knees, hips, back, shoulders, elbows, and hands explode upward into the body of the defender (chest plate and ribs). It is important to get this second step down as fast as possible as this is the step that first contact is made. The arms/hands should explode into the defender has the foot makes contact with the ground which creates an additional force production via Ground Force Reaction – SYNERGY.

KEY POINT: The arms should unload hard into the body so that the defender is literally being punched using the heel of the hands. The contact points can vary depending on if you are using TKO or PIN.

TKO - Hybrid method - inside forearm strikes the near breastplate while the palm of the outside hand strikes the arm pit of the near shoulder. The use of this method is based on driving the defender up and back with the forearm and controlling him with the outside hand in the arm pit.

PIN - Hybrid method - inside forearm strikes the far/mid brestplate while the outside (play side) palm strikes the far arm pit.

KEY POINT: The facemask does not make contact with the body. The facemask is a reference so that the eyes have a landmark so that the body will follow.

G - The next step and every step there after is the GO STEP (unload) and the near foot again takes a short power step into the blocking path that is fast and short (get it down quickly and explosively). Maintaining a wide base is key as you step and drive the defender. As they take the step they immediately drop their hips by coiling their ankles, knees, hips and lower back and re-elevate as their foot makes contact (a mini-explode step) from the ground up unloading from the feet, ankles, knees, hips, shoulders, arms, and hands. They should stay under the defender and maintain contact as they elevate him. Literally elevating through him driving their hands inward and upward as they drive him down the blocking path to their land mark.

Run Your Feet!!! – whether they get to their land mark or get into a stalemate with a defender they must keep their feet moving using powerful, explosive, choppy steps. Never stop moving their feet until the sound of the whistle. Keep all seven cleats on the ground.

CP: If the defender is driven back and off his base as they make their way to the landmark then the blocker should immediately speed up (get on the balls their feet and sprint through the defender) and pancake the defender. The steps should be fast (and short) and as you go to the balls of the feet (vice flat) the stride length will increase so keep a wide base. They go from short choppy power steps to sprinting through the defender.

AIMING POINTS

I like to use aiming points as eye contact references. I want my blockers looking at a specific place on a defender as he is about to make his block so that his body naturally follows his eyes to those landmarks or aiming points. This ensures that he is correctly engaging the defender and maximizing body surface contact as well as shielding the runner from the defender.

Lineman need to have visual targets that they can look at as they move towards a target this make it much easier for them make contact and effectively engage a defender.

BLOCKING SURFACE

•The big key is blocking surface and we want to maximize the area provided to us by the angles we use. We want has much of our blocker’s shoulder, body, and hands on the target as possible to create more force and more control during the block.

•Never lean into a target (always attempt to drive your hips into the target to make sure your Center of Gravity is under the target’s); keep your center of gravity low and stay under the target as you drive him upward. Drive your hips into him so that your body stays under his. The feet are constantly moving towards the defender. This leads me to the next part of the equation.

Head and Hand Contact

The lineman load (cock) their arms past the hips with slightly bent elbows and thumbs up (it doesn’t need to be perfect). As they elevate and the face mask moves towards the soft part of the shoulder they strike into the chest plate and/or ribcage with the palms and drives upward and forward maintaining contact and force throughout the block. The facemask should not actually make contact. It is a reference but incidental contact does occur after the block is made.

You don’t re-cock and strike again instead you keep driving into the defender with the palms as you lock into the defender and keep taking short power steps. The reason for this is two fold; one you want to get the defender on his toes and moving down the track fast and secondly you want to have a large platform or blocking surface (palm of hands, forearms, head, and shoulder) that controls the defenders movements as he tries to break away. The arms and hands should be driving upwards attempting to drive the shoulders off the defender. The initial contact is actually made with the hand, forearms, and shoulder and as lift is created the hand extend upward trying to drive the defender off his feet (and base).

Never ever let your hands, shoulders, or body disengage the target.



EXPLODE OFF THE LOS!

Every blocker on the line must realize that they have to get off the line of scrimmage as fast as possible and engage the defender on the other side of the LOS. The quicker they get off the line the less time the defensive line has to respond and react to the play. Every moment of every practice the coaching staff must ingrain into the line that they must get off the ball and explode into the defense.

LEVERAGE (STAY LOW)!

The blockers must always stay lower then the target they are engaging. These means they must keep their ankles, knees, and hips flexed and attempt to keep their eyes below the chin of their target. The only time they should attempt to lock out all their joints is on the initial explode step and when they are being beaten. In the latter case they should immediately lock out and cause a stalemate.

CP: Getting into and staying in a correct stance is very important part of getting good leverage on the defender. Make sure the line is getting into and staying in a good stance. Make sure on their first step they are still low and on their second step they explode upward.


Hope this helps,

Jack




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[*] posted on 5-2-2007 at 01:00 PM Reply With Quote


Coach Gregory,

You did a much better job of writing it up then I did.
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[*] posted on 5-2-2007 at 03:11 PM Reply With Quote


Quote:
Originally posted by coachgregory

Hope this helps,

Jack


CoachGregory and All other Coaches,

Yes, all of your insight helps immensely!!!

Thanks to you all!
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[*] posted on 5-2-2007 at 04:03 PM Reply With Quote


Quote:
Originally posted by Keith
Quote:
Originally posted by mrice

From what I have been able to glean from studying the DC Wing T, there is not a lot of need for one-on-one drive blocking in his system. In fact, the parent offense, the Delaware Wing T, also minimizes the one-on-one drive blocks and makes use of a lot of angle blocking and combo blocking.



DC and others, please correct me if I am wrong,

In the DC Wing T, I believe the only time a "head up" drive block would be performed would be where the DG or DT are lined up On the OG and OT.


Yes. This could occur playside which is why I said only about two players actually drive block on a play. In the situation you describe, where the OT and OG each have a man over them, you would cross block a run between them and not drive block it.



Quote:

Otherwise, the DG and/or DT would be in a gap and then an easier "angle" block would be performed. This would still be a drive block but from an angle allowing better leverage on the defender.


Yes - And in that situation you would block down and go outside.

But keep in mind that a wise defensive coach in this situation is going to have all his best defenders positioned to play the outside. These are the principals of both the GAM and Jack Gregory's 6-3 (Use your "nosepickers" to funnel the play into your studs). "Blocking down and going outside" can be used to direct you into a minefield.

But it's what we all do...

Quote:

Also, the uncovered OG and/or OT will have to make blocks on the LBs. My thoughts are to have the OG and/or OT line up in the same stance as the player they are going to block.


If you do a search of this site, you'll see I posted that very description after I got back from the DW Conference and it's in the 2007 DC Wing T. However, I've now modified that description so that only uncovered linemen with no one in the gaps use two points. That keeps both the playside and the backside of the line looking exactly the same, pre-snap, while keeping them in the same stance playside as their defender.

I got this from a coach that Jack Gregory had drive me from the airport. He had witnessed, and been beaten by, a Pop Warner team where the entire offensive line stood up. When this team progressed to the regionals, he attended their practice and was surprised to discover they had less talent than he did. They went on to beat all their competition (rolling over teams 35-6) to win the Disney World trophy. Keep in mind, they did this with inferior players. The coach that I talked to attributted their winning to the two point stance allowing them to get into the LBers faster.

He sold me on the idea.
Quote:

If it is a LB, then they will line up in a 2pt stance and perform kind of a "stalk" block where they simply fire out and try to get there body between the LB and the hole called. They would essentially just have to shield the LB from the ball carrier until the whistle blows.


Your thoughts are all welcome.


I should have asked, but failed to ask, the type of downfield block these players were using (Jack Gregory might know). Without knowing that, I wouldn't limit myself to stalking. I'm aware of four different blocks that can be put on a LBer. I'm planning on showing, and letting my players try, all four of them, then pick the one for the player that works best and have him practice using it all the time (forgetting the other three). My philosophy is to find the one thing a player does well and then let him do it all the time.
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[*] posted on 5-8-2007 at 01:40 PM Reply With Quote


Quote:
Originally posted by coachgregory
DC,

Great points as always. I think we discussed this at the DWS with Dave Potter. I coach the oline and I really put a lot of emphasis on team blocking. We have block and tackle every practice and we spend a good portion of time stressing line play because it will win a lot of games for you.

I don't recall who you are talking about...


Think of his blonde wife. He was at your table at the restaurant. I think his last name started with an "M". He had some backfield talk he presented. I didn't hear a word. I was sitting there with my mouth hanging open as his 175 pound TE drive blocked his defender 4-5 yards back every play. The rest of the line was doing the same. I was told he had a big win over a nationally known team.

Quote:

How are things going for you? Are you coaching a team this year?

Jack


I'm headed to San Antonio this month to do a presentation there. This Fall I coach a team of 7-8's. It will be my first go at that young of a player.
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[*] posted on 5-8-2007 at 06:11 PM Reply With Quote


Quote:
Coach to the level of your competition.


That's what it is about. Problem for us is that the "other guys" are getting smarter.
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[*] posted on 5-8-2007 at 06:27 PM Reply With Quote


Jack;

Excellent stuff!

Quote:

TKO - Hybrid method - inside forearm strikes the near breastplate while the palm of the outside hand strikes the arm pit of the near shoulder. The use of this method is based on driving the defender up and back with the forearm and controlling him with the outside hand in the arm pit.

PIN - Hybrid method - inside forearm strikes the far/mid brestplate while the outside (play side) palm strikes the far arm pit.


Please elaborate. This sounds kinda' like a shoulder block, what exactly is the blocking surface?

Are you more of a "hands" blocking teacher?

Since you are blocking on a 30 degrees angle much of the time, shoulders would seem a natural. Just curious why you chose what you do. I know that you do very thorough homework.

BTW, you ever study the noted Wing T o-line coaches, i.e., Perry or Herman?

JB
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[*] posted on 5-8-2007 at 06:38 PM Reply With Quote


Quote:
Originally posted by coachgregory
Excerpt from my new Playbook - 2nd Edition Triple B Playbook -


While I am asking...;)

What is your teaching progression for the o-line? I.e., how do you teach what you do? I know, a loaded question. Could you list your blocking drills/progression in short form. Just would like to know how we match up.

I.e., stance; bird dog; 6-pt; step and hit on bag; step, hit and drive; double teams; trap; pull and pancake; etc.

What types of drills with just players and no bags? I.e., 5 on 3s...

Thanks.
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[*] posted on 5-9-2007 at 10:02 AM Reply With Quote


Quote:
Originally posted by JB
Jack;

Excellent stuff!

Quote:

TKO - Hybrid method - inside forearm strikes the near breastplate while the palm of the outside hand strikes the arm pit of the near shoulder. The use of this method is based on driving the defender up and back with the forearm and controlling him with the outside hand in the arm pit.

PIN - Hybrid method - inside forearm strikes the far/mid brestplate while the outside (play side) palm strikes the far arm pit.


Please elaborate. This sounds kinda' like a shoulder block, what exactly is the blocking surface?

Are you more of a "hands" blocking teacher?

Since you are blocking on a 30 degrees angle much of the time, shoulders would seem a natural. Just curious why you chose what you do. I know that you do very thorough homework.

BTW, you ever study the noted Wing T o-line coaches, i.e., Perry or Herman?

JB



When I stated Hybrid it is a SHOULDER/FOREARM/HAND method.

The initial contact is the far shoulder and near forearm and as they explode upward they finish off the contact with the inside forearm and outside hand.

Jack




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[*] posted on 5-9-2007 at 10:02 AM Reply With Quote


I have Herman's blocking tape and I have some notes from Perry.

Jack




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[*] posted on 5-9-2007 at 10:11 AM Reply With Quote


Quote:
Originally posted by JB
Quote:
Originally posted by coachgregory
Excerpt from my new Playbook - 2nd Edition Triple B Playbook -


While I am asking...;)

What is your teaching progression for the o-line? I.e., how do you teach what you do? I know, a loaded question. Could you list your blocking drills/progression in short form. Just would like to know how we match up.

I.e., stance; bird dog; 6-pt; step and hit on bag; step, hit and drive; double teams; trap; pull and pancake; etc.

What types of drills with just players and no bags? I.e., 5 on 3s...

Thanks.



Stance
Get Off (cadence - explode off the ball)
LEG progression (footwork and technique)
Explosive Leg Strength (GET OFF)
Wedge progression
Pulling progression
Blocking Schemes
Adjustments

JJ Lawson just completed a OLINE MANUAL for TKO and it is very similar to what I do...I do a few things different but the overall concept is the same.

http://www.gregorydoublewing.com/Coaching_A_Dominant_O_Line.pdf

Password: JJLawson

Jack

Jack




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[*] posted on 5-25-2007 at 03:31 PM Reply With Quote


Guys I need some help? I cannot decided between the GOL or the SAB (TKO) blocking schemes. Here is were I am having a hard time. The team that gave me the hardest time last year ran a 3-3 stack or 5-3 with the linebackers stacked behind the tackles. The tackle is lined up head up on my tackle. And what they would do was run stunts with the stacked linebacker and the DT. And we used GOL blocking last season and according to the rules the tackle would block the guy head up on him and as soon as he chased the stunting tackle the blitz hole would open up everytime. The other problem we had against the good teams was when our guys had to one on one block a lot of times the defensive line was so fast and disruptive he would destroy the play. Now if I use the TKO blocking the problem is I don't have anyone blocking the corner. I run the Jet offense out of a slot formation. And the play I am describing is basically Ted Seay 23 Jet Slam but against this defense.
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[*] posted on 5-25-2007 at 03:35 PM Reply With Quote


DC and I had a nice chat on this issue on a different thread about how the DC offense matches up against the 3-3 or 3-5. In a nutshell, the O linemen do not chase. They block on a track and take whoever shows. 2 defenders in the front 6 run themselves out of every play, so you don't bother to block them.

http://www.dumcoach.com/viewthread.php?tid=932
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[*] posted on 5-25-2007 at 03:37 PM Reply With Quote


Coach I don't run the entire DC offense I run the jet offense. Meaning I don't have the wingback track blocking that hole but my opposite wing kicks out the playside DE.
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[*] posted on 5-25-2007 at 04:04 PM Reply With Quote


I have only a cursury familiarity with the Jet Offense, but the principles for the O-line may be the same. I have faced the 3-5 on only a few occassions, and never out of the DC, but I believe that his track/zone blocking principals would have some application to most offenses. We did something very similar to what DC suggested when we faced a 3-5 as a I formation/Power I team.
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[*] posted on 5-25-2007 at 05:05 PM Reply With Quote


Quote:
Originally posted by coachgregory

L.E.G FOOTWORK

• L – Load Step
• E – Explode Step
• G – Go Step



After reading JJ's "Dominant O-Line" article, I'm changing my mind. As recent as this Monday night, I was going w/ your original "B.E.E.F." Primarily because:

1 - I liked the "Blast Off" for B. But, as you mentioned in your CP's earlier, emphasizing "Explode off the LOS" should already be a central part of everything we do.

2 - I needed a "rallying cry" to help the kids remember, and I thought they'd like "BEEF" better than "LEG." Cheesy I know, but whatever motivates a 3rd grader, right?

But, I can definitely see how "LEG" - especially w/ the "GO" - will help enforce the same concepts.

I can hear myself at practice already, "Who's got LEGs?" "Give me some LEG" "Where's your LEG?" and my new personal favorite, "SHOW ME YOUR LEGs!!!!!!!!!"

Awesome, stuff. My kudos to you and JJ.

Quote:
Originally posted by coachgregory

Head and Hand Contact

The lineman load (cock) their arms past the hips with slightly bent elbows and thumbs up (it doesn’t need to be perfect). As they elevate and the face mask moves towards the soft part of the shoulder they strike into the chest plate and/or ribcage with the palms and drives upward and forward maintaining contact and force throughout the block. The facemask should not actually make contact. It is a reference but incidental contact does occur after the block is made.



Coach-

Am I correct that your technique for this initial contact is different than JJ's? If I read his article correctly, he emphasizes closed fists as opposed to open hands.

Personally, I'm thinking the open hands and striking w/ the palms would come more naturally to a 3rd grader - albeit, I recognize and agree with JJ's comment about the closed fists helping to reduce the chance of holding.

Still, I like open hands with palms driving upwards as you suggest.

Have I got this mixed up?

Chad
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[*] posted on 5-26-2007 at 07:59 AM Reply With Quote


Quote:
Originally posted by HuskyCoach
Quote:
Originally posted by coachgregory

L.E.G FOOTWORK

• L – Load Step
• E – Explode Step
• G – Go Step



After reading JJ's "Dominant O-Line" article, I'm changing my mind. As recent as this Monday night, I was going w/ your original "B.E.E.F." Primarily because:

1 - I liked the "Blast Off" for B. But, as you mentioned in your CP's earlier, emphasizing "Explode off the LOS" should already be a central part of everything we do.

2 - I needed a "rallying cry" to help the kids remember, and I thought they'd like "BEEF" better than "LEG." Cheesy I know, but whatever motivates a 3rd grader, right?

But, I can definitely see how "LEG" - especially w/ the "GO" - will help enforce the same concepts.

I can hear myself at practice already, "Who's got LEGs?" "Give me some LEG" "Where's your LEG?" and my new personal favorite, "SHOW ME YOUR LEGs!!!!!!!!!"

Awesome, stuff. My kudos to you and JJ.

Quote:
Originally posted by coachgregory

Head and Hand Contact

The lineman load (cock) their arms past the hips with slightly bent elbows and thumbs up (it doesn’t need to be perfect). As they elevate and the face mask moves towards the soft part of the shoulder they strike into the chest plate and/or ribcage with the palms and drives upward and forward maintaining contact and force throughout the block. The facemask should not actually make contact. It is a reference but incidental contact does occur after the block is made.



Coach-

Am I correct that your technique for this initial contact is different than JJ's? If I read his article correctly, he emphasizes closed fists as opposed to open hands.

Personally, I'm thinking the open hands and striking w/ the palms would come more naturally to a 3rd grader - albeit, I recognize and agree with JJ's comment about the closed fists helping to reduce the chance of holding.

Still, I like open hands with palms driving upwards as you suggest.

Have I got this mixed up?

Chad


Chad,

Thanks JJ and I really worked on improving how we teach this all off season. Like I said we do things a little different as far as technique but the overall concept and philosophy is the exact same.

I prefer the palm because it is more powerful from a kinetic perspective and it reduce the chance of a sprained/jammed wrist. Also if a ref sees a closed fist and your player accidentally punches the player instead of blocking him that is 15 yards and it might get that kid ejected...so I have stayed away from it...but the concept of it makes sense and I know why JJ uses it.

I reduce the holding because we STRESS DRIVE the palms upward. Also if I see player holding I stop the play point out he was holding punish the entire line (and tell them that one holding call goes against the entire team) and then go back to executing the play. I can't stand holding calls and in this scheme it is from getting lazy and not driving your feet and your body (GO).

Jack




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[*] posted on 5-26-2007 at 08:31 AM Reply With Quote


Quote:
Originally posted by coachgregory

Also if a ref sees a closed fist and your player accidentally punches the player instead of blocking him that is 15 yards and it might get that kid ejected...so I have stayed away from it...



An exact concern of mine as well...
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