Author Topic: Acheiving & Maintaining Excellence  (Read 1043 times)

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Re: Acheiving & Maintaining Excellence
« Reply #15 on: June 27, 2018, 01:41:21 PM »
Chris

It's a funny thing, I always consider myself lucky. When I first started coaching it was in a top flite organization that had some really excellent coaches. Simply winning wasn't enough, we were competitive amongst ourselves. I have always wondered if I had started in a bad organization, if I would have been perpetually bad. I am grateful to my mentors who expected excellence.

I always relate the story of my first year as a HC, I was young & very lucky to get the team. We were playing our arch rivals in a night game(rare back then). There was a great crowd, & all my mentors were in the stands. Early in the game we had a 4th & 1 inside our 30. I elected to go for it, we made it. After the game one mentor makes a bee line for me. I am thinking it's to congratulate me(we had won 28-0). Instead he gave me an ass chewing, telling me the smart play was to punt.

This is a prime example, here I won a big football game in front of a big crowd & I could have done better. It was always about being better. When I won my first State Championship, I heard you weren't undefeated. When we went undefeated & State Champs, you didn't go unscored on. There was always another goal. In hindsight some were stupid, but the struggle to compete is what drove us.

Joe
"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"
Bill Walsh

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Re: Acheiving & Maintaining Excellence
« Reply #16 on: June 30, 2018, 11:24:57 AM »
Often there is a point in the season where the doldrums will occur. It maybe a stretch of games against poor opponents or just perhaps things are becoming stale. This is often what separates coaches. You have to bring the same excitement to practice in the middle of the season as you did on day 1.


The other thing to do is give a day off, you will be surprised how rejuvenated your team can be after not having a practice. When you do this you have to make sure that the one practice you do have that week is very spirited & efficient.


Joe
"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"
Bill Walsh

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Re: Acheiving & Maintaining Excellence
« Reply #17 on: July 01, 2018, 03:52:27 PM »
One common mistake coaches will make is thinking they have to out coach the man on the other side. The reality is your players have to out play his. One of my mentors would always say, "it's not what I know as a coach, rather what my players know on the field".

Maintaining excellence is all about what your players know on the field. In today's times there is a shortage of FBI(football intelligence). Whether this is because of video games, or a more sedimentary childhood I don't know. I only know players today don't have the level of FBI they did in years past. Your job as a coach is to instill & raise their abilities to perform with a high level of FBI.  How to do this is rather simple, teach &  review game situations in practice as much as you can.


At the HS level we will often start practice with either an overtime situation or a goal line situation. We make it a competition, loser doing Up Downs or push ups. At the youth level this can difficult because you aren't 2 platoon. So you have to come up with ways to make it competitive while reviewing game situations. Keep this in mind during your drills. Make sure your players understand different game situations & know how to respond.


One of the last things we do in our pre game routine is to go over "Coaches Favorite Play". Taking a snap & taking a knee to end a game has to be practiced just like everything else. We do it & stress we must have the ball at the whistle.


Joe
"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"
Bill Walsh

Offline PSLCOACHROB

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Re: Acheiving & Maintaining Excellence
« Reply #18 on: July 02, 2018, 10:59:05 AM »
Often there is a point in the season where the doldrums will occur. It maybe a stretch of games against poor opponents or just perhaps things are becoming stale. This is often what separates coaches. You have to bring the same excitement to practice in the middle of the season as you did on day 1.


The other thing to do is give a day off, you will be surprised how rejuvenated your team can be after not having a practice. When you do this you have to make sure that the one practice you do have that week is very spirited & efficient.


Joe
In our dominant years we ran into stretches of weak opponents. Those weeks we would amp up the competitve aspects of practice. Goal line is a great example. Invent situations where starters thought they were being replaced or even replace them for a game. Get a group of starters thinking they are being replaced and see how their intensity goes up. Working heavily on the things you don't do well is a good idea. Adding a new series of plays can spark enthusiasm as well. We would also challenge  the team with "games within the game". Things like no first downs allowed or even negative yardage on defense or no 3rd downs on offense. Against weak opponents subbing got mixed up to get back ups more experience and our play calling might get more aggressive which generally equals more fun.

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Re: Acheiving & Maintaining Excellence
« Reply #19 on: July 02, 2018, 02:46:28 PM »
Rob

That's why JCM was such a good coach. He was also never satisfied. That didn't mean schemes(although he wanted to learn as many as possible) he wanted techniques, drills, reads, & motivational tips. He was an all in, 12 month a year guy. I'm sure he will return to coaching soon.

The first time we met was on a flight to Panama, we drew schemes & plays for the whole flight. Then we got to the hotel & had dry erase markers on the mirror.

Joe
"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"
Bill Walsh

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Re: Acheiving & Maintaining Excellence
« Reply #20 on: July 02, 2018, 03:08:25 PM »
Rob

That's why JCM was such a good coach. He was also never satisfied. That didn't mean schemes(although he wanted to learn as many as possible) he wanted techniques, drills, reads, & motivational tips. He was an all in, 12 month a year guy. I'm sure he will return to coaching soon.

The first time we met was on a flight to Panama, we drew schemes & plays for the whole flight. Then we got to the hotel & had dry erase markers on the mirror.

Joe
Idk about him coming back soon. Hard to say though. He moved south and I don't know what kind of connections he has down there. I would be really surprised if he coached youth again. I think once you coach hs youth might be a bit limited. I think now he is enjoying not coaching.

I think what held him above many others is he was never really satisfied. He truly believes that the only way to achieve excellence is to strive for perfection. Scheme wise in youth, he made what we did look complicated while actually being rather simple. We borrowed a bunch from all kinds of schemes. But we never counted on scheme to win. You need it all.

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Re: Acheiving & Maintaining Excellence
« Reply #21 on: July 10, 2018, 09:37:05 PM »
Right now is the time coaches should be prepping for the season. You should have already had your schemes in place coaching wise. Now plan your practices, review drills with coaches.

Here's something important to start thinking about. When you are accessing your talent for whom plays where, don't get caught up in what they did last season or if they pass the eye test. Each year players will change & develop, start not by thinking of where they played last season but where they will best help this team.

Player placement is often where coaches have issues. This is at all levels. I have often been asked how I always pick the right TB. It isn't always the fast, or slickest, but always the best RB. I always watch what every player does in every drill I can watch. Often you will see who your "players" are by simply watching what they do in drills.

Joe
"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"
Bill Walsh

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Re: Acheiving & Maintaining Excellence
« Reply #22 on: July 11, 2018, 06:07:56 PM »
Wednesday is a day off for our staff. The DC, the LB coach, & I had lunch today. We spent the time eating & discussing personnel for the upcoming season. Afterwards we went outside & spent an hour drawing up schemes & talking about making practice better. These are the kind of things you have to do to be better. Our discussion wasn't about what we do well, rather what can we do to be better. The ideas passed back & forth, you never know where a great will come from.

As a coach sometimes a simple lunch & discussion can do a staff a lot of good.

Joe
"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"
Bill Walsh