Author Topic: Developing Coaches  (Read 82447 times)

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Offline Michael

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #120 on: December 30, 2015, 01:52:45 PM »
R

The only difference is.... as you well know....they have the means and the time and the year round commitment to chase perfection. We dont and thats OK...we only need serviceable to be successful. Basically...hand the HS Coaches a kid that is at least willing to put in the work.

DLS wasn't special until they were special.
“If you can't explain it to a six-year-old, you don't understand it yourself.” ― Albert Einstein

Offline jrk5150

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #121 on: December 30, 2015, 02:08:54 PM »
That is one of the biggest mistakes I see youth coaches make regardless of weight rules. Sure, put the ball in your best athletes hands but how many offensive weapons do you need? If you can't block for them it doesn't matter. On a youth team with somewhere around 24 kids on the roster, I can't see the logic in having more than one back up at each position.

For me it's less about keeping that third string FB in the backfield, and more about maximizing the 22 positions available to make sure kids get their plays in positions where they can best help the team...knowing that sometimes "helping" means hurting us the least.

Specifically as it applies to the OL, I don't like to have kids play both the backfield and the line - I can never quite figure out how to do indies/group with them, and feel like they never quite do as well as they should in either place. I will occasionally make an exception but it's rare and I try to avoid it. Of course, once my roster gets much below 23-24 kids that's not very realistic, but that's my preference.

I have two positions on my starting OL - pulling G and strong TE - where I look for best fit and will play kids that would have otherwise gotten significant time at RB. When that happens I may try to work the kid into the backfield once I'm comfortable they have their line position down, and they might get some reps later in the season, but no promises. Just for example, I had a kid start at QG one year and then at QB the next.

That really doesn't leave a ton of room on the OL for more RB types. My experience in my org is that with a roster of 24-25 kids, maybe 10-11 of them actually can play RB. As I said, a couple of those may end up on the OL.  That means I typically end up with 15-17 kids in the mix for 14 OL spots (I run two offensive lines). As you can see, the numbers don't really work out. What I end up with is a few kids that have OL positions and a few that have RB positions that get reps in practice, but play the majority of their snaps on D.

I realize I haven't really considered the D when it comes to the MPR's, but our priority is to keep the D as strong as we can, so we don't put kids out there if they can't/won't run/hit tackle. We try to make sure that every kid has a position on O, and to minimize the number of kids who need to play D to get their MPR's.

Just to give you an example - our roster was like 29 kids going into our season, and we had 10 kids that we didn't want anywhere near the defense while the game was in doubt. When you do the math, that was a challenge.

« Last Edit: December 30, 2015, 02:33:47 PM by jrk5150 »

Offline bigshel

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #122 on: December 30, 2015, 02:52:09 PM »
R

DLS is a good example of this.

Except for Boss Tagaloa. But even at 260 lbs., he's a smallish lineman, but what a beast.

Offline Michael

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #123 on: December 30, 2015, 02:58:16 PM »
Except for Boss Tagaloa. But even at 260 lbs., he's a smallish lineman, but what a beast.

He was on their varsity roster at the end of his freshman year, but he's developed a ton, I think.
“If you can't explain it to a six-year-old, you don't understand it yourself.” ― Albert Einstein

Offline bigshel

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #124 on: December 30, 2015, 03:29:43 PM »
He was on their varsity roster at the end of his freshman year, but he's developed a ton, I think.

Indeed. He pretty much owned the LOS from his DT spot vs. Centennial. If they have a DI athlete on the roster, he's it. Not to disparage any of the other kids on the roster, but he is, literally and figuratively, head and shoulders above the rest.

Offline MHcoach

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #125 on: December 30, 2015, 03:33:06 PM »
When I put together a Youth team there is a very distinct order I do it in. First, I need to find the QB. Next, how to get my 11 best athletes on Defense. Then I develop an offense. We always look for a way to minimize the number of two way players without hurting one unit or the other.

Now I understand about weight restrictions & striper rules that wasn't was I was objecting to. Saying that you know what positions any player will play before they get in pads, just seems wrong to me. I think that doesn't allow for a player to develop or improve as the season goes along. We always had a different team at the Nationals then when we started the season.

Joe
"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"
Bill Walsh

Offline Michael

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #126 on: December 30, 2015, 03:42:13 PM »
When I put together a Youth team there is a very distinct order I do it in. First, I need to find the QB. Next, how to get my 11 best athletes on Defense. Then I develop an offense. We always look for a way to minimize the number of two way players without hurting one unit or the other.

Now I understand about weight restrictions & striper rules that wasn't was I was objecting to. Saying that you know what positions any player will play before they get in pads, just seems wrong to me. I think that doesn't allow for a player to develop or improve as the season goes along. We always had a different team at the Nationals then when we started the season.

Joe


I need those traffic spikes they have in the rental car lots or wherever it is so you can go in but not out.

I always seem to start out with three guys on O-Line and get more and more as they get cut from the ball guy crowd.  Then after a few weeks of drills and such various O-Line guys start looking like they'd be pretty good fullbacks and tight ends and such and then they get taken back for the ball guy crowd.  It's weird how in a couple of weeks they look more aggressive and athletic.  Not that I'm bitter about it or anything.  I figure I'll get them back in a few more weeks when it turns out they're apparently actually not that aggressive and not that athletic.
“If you can't explain it to a six-year-old, you don't understand it yourself.” ― Albert Einstein

Offline mahonz

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #127 on: December 30, 2015, 03:49:43 PM »
When I put together a Youth team there is a very distinct order I do it in. First, I need to find the QB. Next, how to get my 11 best athletes on Defense. Then I develop an offense. We always look for a way to minimize the number of two way players without hurting one unit or the other.

Now I understand about weight restrictions & striper rules that wasn't was I was objecting to. Saying that you know what positions any player will play before they get in pads, just seems wrong to me. I think that doesn't allow for a player to develop or improve as the season goes along. We always had a different team at the Nationals then when we started the season.

Joe


LOL

You are being way too literal here Joe.

When a 140 pound 10 year old shows up day one in no pads Im not thinking QB. Its against the Rules. He has 10 other positions he MUST play.

That is all....no need to keep making it more that it is. You've beat your point to death now. We get it.  :)
Collect moments, not wins.

Offline Michael

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #128 on: December 30, 2015, 03:50:42 PM »
LOL

You are being way too literal here Joe.

When a 140 pound 10 year old shows up day one in no pads Im not thinking QB. Its against the Rules. He has 10 other positions he MUST play.

That is all....no need to keep making it more that it is. You've beat your point to death now. We get it.  :)

Yeah, Joe.  If Mahonz gets it, EVERYBODY gets it.
“If you can't explain it to a six-year-old, you don't understand it yourself.” ― Albert Einstein

Offline mahonz

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #129 on: December 30, 2015, 03:52:07 PM »
Yeah, Joe.  If Mahonz gets it, EVERYBODY gets it.

Correct !....since Im always last.  :)
Collect moments, not wins.

Offline Michael

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #130 on: December 30, 2015, 03:54:21 PM »
Correct !....since Im always last.  :)

That's two in a row for you.

:)
“If you can't explain it to a six-year-old, you don't understand it yourself.” ― Albert Einstein

Offline PSLCOACHROB

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #131 on: December 30, 2015, 03:55:02 PM »
Many youth offenses involve 32 personnel groupings as their base. It baffles me why one would want the tes to be with the wrs when doing group time in that scenario. Even if you have other packages with wrs, why have lineman(tes are linemen damn it!!!) running routes with wrs when you only throw twice a friggin game? You run every other darn play so why do they need to be practicing routes instead of blocking?

Offline Michael

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #132 on: December 30, 2015, 04:00:07 PM »
Many youth offenses involve 32 personnel groupings as their base. It baffles me why one would want the tes to be with the wrs when doing group time in that scenario. Even if you have other packages with wrs, why have lineman(tes are linemen damn it!!!) running routes with wrs when you only throw twice a friggin game? You run every other darn play so why do they need to be practicing routes instead of blocking?

The best part is when the OC figures they're some kind of blocking machines even though they never practice blocking.

"And hey, you gonna have Jamal in the game, too."

"Oh, great.  Thanks."


I had this conversation while coaching little dudes:

HC: I saw how you had the TE passing the defender off to the tackle.

Me: He wasn't passing off sh__.  He was getting his ass kicked.  The tackle was coming over because we knew the TE would never be able to block that guy.
“If you can't explain it to a six-year-old, you don't understand it yourself.” ― Albert Einstein

Offline angalton

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #133 on: December 30, 2015, 04:04:58 PM »
All of my kids learn o line positions. Some may never play on the line, but I started with the basics for everyone. Plus we do skill drills and mental drills to evaluate. They all need to know stance, leverage, and drive. I usually have 25 to start and 20-22 mid season on.
The greatest accomplishment is not in never failing, but in rising again after you fail.

Offline jrk5150

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #134 on: December 30, 2015, 04:15:32 PM »
Actually, that's exactly why I don't like having kids play both line and RB positions.  If they're going to play on the line, they need to be with the line most of practice. And that includes the TE's, they are linemen.  In fact, I do a lousy job practicing the passing game. I tried this year to carve out a section where the OL did pass blocking and the RB's and TE's did routes, but that lasted like a day, LOL.