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Author Topic: Developing Coaches  (Read 54160 times)

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Offline Michael

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #135 on: December 30, 2015, 04:18:32 PM »
Actually, that's exactly why I don't like having kids play both line and RB positions.  If they're going to play on the line, they need to be with the line most of practice. And that includes the TE's, they are linemen.  In fact, I do a lousy job practicing the passing game. I tried this year to carve out a section where the OL did pass blocking and the RB's and TE's did routes, but that lasted like a day, LOL.

If they ever decide to start calling illegal players downfield where I am, I'm going to need a pass pro technique you can put in during a time out.
“If you can't explain it to a six-year-old, you don't understand it yourself.” ― Albert Einstein

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #136 on: December 31, 2015, 09:17:06 AM »
Many youth offenses involve 32 personnel groupings as their base. It baffles me why one would want the tes to be with the wrs when doing group time in that scenario. Even if you have other packages with wrs, why have lineman(tes are linemen damn it!!!) running routes with wrs when you only throw twice a friggin game? You run every other darn play so why do they need to be practicing routes instead of blocking?

Rob

There is an old coaching maxim, "If run the ball 80% of the time then practice it 80% of the time. Many coaches at all levels fall into this trap. It's sexier to practice routes than blocking. Even though we are a Spread team our receivers spend much individual time working on blocking. Blocking & tackling are the 2 most important things for any football team.

Joe
"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"
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Offline PSLCOACHROB

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #137 on: December 31, 2015, 02:00:08 PM »
Rob

There is an old coaching maxim, "If run the ball 80% of the time then practice it 80% of the time. Many coaches at all levels fall into this trap. It's sexier to practice routes than blocking. Even though we are a Spread team our receivers spend much individual time working on blocking. Blocking & tackling are the 2 most important things for any football team.

Joe

Oh, ok, good. I thought it was just me.  ;)

Online MHcoach

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #138 on: December 31, 2015, 03:12:51 PM »
Rob

As a coach I understand you know that it is a different block for Oline than it is for a WR or a RB. We coach them each on different techniques to fit their position. I remember getting a stud RB several years ago you had never been taught to block. Teaching him technique for a run block & was pass block was something he had never done. I was amazed he had played in Pop Warner & 3 years of Varsity Football but never taught to block.

I think every coach needs to keep it in focus, this is why fundamentals matter.

I will give you an example of what drives me insane. When I watch a RB have the ball in the wrong hand I simply shake my head. Now, it maybe that his coach as many have today doesn't worry about which hand & believes the strong hand is best always; or it could be the first sign of bad coaching. So I then watch the hand off, taking the snap, & other simple things to see if they are being coached. More often than not it is the first sign of poor coaching. I see backs making no pocket & grabbing at the ball. The hand off is a jab & then stop. Then the coach comments on how perfect their fundy's are.

My team's fundamentals aren't perfect, that's why we practice them. Alabama's aren't, neither is the Patriots. Somewhere 8 y/o's have perfect form & don't need to practice them.


Joe
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Online mahonz

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #139 on: December 31, 2015, 03:58:54 PM »
Many youth offenses involve 32 personnel groupings as their base. It baffles me why one would want the tes to be with the wrs when doing group time in that scenario. Even if you have other packages with wrs, why have lineman(tes are linemen damn it!!!) running routes with wrs when you only throw twice a friggin game? You run every other darn play so why do they need to be practicing routes instead of blocking?

R


Why not have the TE's drill with the OL all the time and simply add a QB and a WO in for passing session? Then you can practice the few routes necessary and pass blocking all at the same time.

Have to figure out some time for the passing game for the TE's if you use a ton of 32 personnel...even for 2 or 3 plays per game. 

Have the teams you are coaching on taking the TE's away from you like way than 50% of the time?...and then hardly ever throwing to them? 
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Offline PSLCOACHROB

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #140 on: December 31, 2015, 05:41:18 PM »
R


Why not have the TE's drill with the OL all the time and simply add a QB and a WO in for passing session? Then you can practice the few routes necessary and pass blocking all at the same time.

Have to figure out some time for the passing game for the TE's if you use a ton of 32 personnel...even for 2 or 3 plays per game. 

Have the teams you are coaching on taking the TE's away from you like way than 50% of the time?...and then hardly ever throwing to them? 
Mike,
   First off, if you run 32 personnel as your base set, the tes are most likely blocking tes. We all get that. In fact in youth, tes are almost always just linemen that we talk into playing the position because they would rather be playing wr. Secondly, I have solutions for practicing tes into a small passing game, similiar to watch you laid out. Others don't and think they need to have the tes, who block 90% of the time, run routes most of the time. In the dw and other offenses that have similar philosophies, tes NEED to be great blockers first off. I could not care less if they can catch. It has been my experience that most of the time, with tes who block really well, you won't have to pass in the dw(or sw or power I etc) until you just get bored as a play caller.

Offline angalton

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #141 on: December 31, 2015, 06:50:05 PM »
My TEs are mainly blockers. (Double tight wishbone) They learn two routes and a TE reverse also.
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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #142 on: December 31, 2015, 09:17:14 PM »
Mike,
   First off, if you run 32 personnel as your base set, the tes are most likely blocking tes. We all get that. In fact in youth, tes are almost always just linemen that we talk into playing the position because they would rather be playing wr. Secondly, I have solutions for practicing tes into a small passing game, similiar to watch you laid out. Others don't and think they need to have the tes, who block 90% of the time, run routes most of the time. In the dw and other offenses that have similar philosophies, tes NEED to be great blockers first off. I could not care less if they can catch. It has been my experience that most of the time, with tes who block really well, you won't have to pass in the dw(or sw or power I etc) until you just get bored as a play caller.

R

Makes sense. Gotta design you practice to fit the actual play calling.

I love the TE position so much for passing we started experimenting with one or two in our Empty stuff last Spring just for grins. 

I liked it so much I kept it for the Fall. Whats kind tough is having the OT pass pro around the vacating TE.

So....all hands drilling is required for this kind of stuff. Last clip you can hear my son (  Coach Chernobyl ) after the play. Man I miss that kid.

https://youtu.be/7VDXavu43wU
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Online mahonz

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #143 on: December 31, 2015, 09:23:29 PM »
Here is an interesting development...pun intended.

Got an email from a coach in our Org that coached the age group below me. He was wondering how it is the teams I coach consistently do pretty well. He had a very rough year as a new HC and is looking for some answers.

So rather than telling him what I have learned over the years...this years Spring Staff wants to invite him to join us so he can just live it in person.

I hope he accepts. Even if its part time. Should be one heck of a coaches clinic for him. About 100 years worth of expedience on this particular Staff.
Collect moments, not wins.

Offline PSLCOACHROB

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #144 on: January 01, 2016, 12:38:40 AM »
Mike,
   I love the te in the passing game as well. In fact, over the years the te has easily been the player we throw to the most in the dw. I think te trips is just about one of the nastiest formation out there. Tes seem to get lost in coverage. If I was running anything other than what we run I think one of our feature positions would be the te. As is, I need that kid to block his ass off and really not a whole lot else. Catching is a bonus for sure but we can work on the passing game for the 3 routes he runs pre practice or steal some time somewhere else.

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #145 on: January 16, 2016, 08:04:16 PM »
In another post the subject of good youth coaching vs average youth coaching came up. We always coached our team to get ready for good teams. It's important to teach sound football, even if the majority of your opponents aren't. By coaching your team to play a quality team, you more than become ready to play the run of the mill team. Don't focus or think your opponent won't do something; instead focus on what good teams do.

Joe
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Offline Coach Correa

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #146 on: January 17, 2016, 11:28:24 AM »
In another post the subject of good youth coaching vs average youth coaching came up. We always coached our team to get ready for good teams. It's important to teach sound football, even if the majority of your opponents aren't. By coaching your team to play a quality team, you more than become ready to play the run of the mill team. Don't focus or think your opponent won't do something; instead focus on what good teams do.

Joe

This becomes difficult and challenging when these guys that don't have a clue experience success because they have horses . They start walking around like there Nick Saban and feel they know it all. It drives me nuts if you look some of the Convo's that go on here and other board's it's shows  how many people that got teams that truly have no clue......
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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #147 on: January 17, 2016, 04:44:27 PM »
T

I will give you a great example of this. My first year at Mint Hill our organization was brand new & the first year in AYF. The league attempted to send us a message by scheduling the team that had won the league the last 4 years. They thought they were throwing us to the lions. We were able to scout them & were well prepared. Their coach was considered the class of the league & honestly he did sound things. They ran a power Wishbone with no option & a 5-3. We also knew they never had a scout on us. It was 30-0 at the half & we cruised to 44-12.

Afterward, the coach was very complimentary, but warned us he would be ready for the playoffs. They were clearly the second best team, most the others were nothing to write home about. Now, here's the thing the 3rd & 4th place teams had the attitude that they could coach.

We played those teams & won by 50 going away. In "Ship", the second best team couldn't believe how much better our team was. The coach was totally amazed how we improved throughout the season. Point being, by preparing for good teams or great teams your team will be much better.

Joe
"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"
Bill Walsh

Offline PSLCOACHROB

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #148 on: January 17, 2016, 05:46:57 PM »
Joe,
   Every year we heard that teams would be ready for us in the playoffs. It was always worse in the playoffs. Bad coaching cannot make a team better. Heck, mediocre coaching can't. Luckily for me I was with a guy who new what the heck he was doing and understood that you need to build slowly but surely. Try to install it all now and you get good at nothing.

  You have to know your league and what the other coaches can throw at you. You have to understand what your kids can handle. You have to understand what your staff can handle. It also involves an plan to build throughout the entire year. I think in many ways a practice schedule for the season is more important than a daily schedule. Without vision of where you want to go and how you plan on getting there you'll be lost. That isn't something that needs to be minute by minute detail but some thought as to how you will install over the year should occur. Then there is the stuff you install and don't use. Maybe show it a few times to run it against other live bodies. You know you will need it eventually but you need to be good at it when you do need it. Trap was one of those things for us. We installed it after our base was in. We were always a really god trap team but you would never know it from our regular season games. Same with our passing game. We had some teams that could really sling it but the only ones that knew it were us.

 

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #149 on: January 17, 2016, 07:02:19 PM »
R

Knowing your old HC, I know exactly what you mean. Many youth coaches struggle with thinking it's all about your opponent that week. It's never about the opponent rather it's all about your team. I have never watched film of our game & graded the other team.

I also firmly believe the character & style of your team is something that develops as the season & coaching do. I think for us the amount of install & the specifics totally was dependent on what that team could do. Sure I had an idea the direction I wanted to take them, but I always took them as far as their talent allowed.

The coaching staff was a completely different issue. As a HC I was fortunate to have coaches that could coach. I can honestly say at the HS level & being an AC that isn't always the case.

Joe
"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"
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