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Author Topic: Developing Coaches  (Read 54161 times)

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Offline Dusty Ol Fart

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #255 on: November 22, 2016, 10:06:33 PM »
The only way I learned was via trial and error, Reading, Watching, and LISTENING! 

During Tebow's run at Florida, I cant tell you how many times I had a coach say did you see that, we need to run that play.  Funny, I came out with about 40 plays my first year too. We were going to run a 4-3 defense if it killed us.  By the 2nd week in practice I had scrapped the Play Book! By the 3rd game of the season, I scrapped the 4-3! 

Bottom Line What can we do and what can we do repeatedly!??  More important what can you teach them to do repeatedly. 

Best thing you can learn is that most O and D Systems are well established.  Find one that just clicks for you and get rudimentary about teaching it!   ;)



Not MPP... ONE TASK!  Teach them!  :)

Offline CoachDP

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #256 on: November 23, 2016, 11:21:04 AM »
Dave Potter, whom we all know is a die hard Double Wing coach, had to coach a team running TFS. Those 2 offenses are diametrically opposed. DP knew little about the TFS, so he studied & learned.

And got help from Joe.  We used what you sent us.  And of course it worked great.

--Dave
"If You Want To Have Better Players, Be A Better Coach."

The Mission Statement:
"I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

Offline PSLCOACHROB

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #257 on: November 23, 2016, 12:00:52 PM »
Youth coaches tend to lack two things that I think really hinders them. The first is a real understanding of what it takes to be a good coach. Most have no idea and think they can do it from memory from their hs days. We all know that will not work. The other aspect is they lack mentors. It is much easier to learn imo if you can sit down with someone or attend a well ran practice and see how things should be.

Offline CoachDP

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #258 on: November 23, 2016, 12:43:32 PM »
Youth coaches tend to lack two things that I think really hinders them. The first is a real understanding of what it takes to be a good coach.

I would venture to guess that they have no idea that it takes hard work to be good at it.  And when game day rolls around and they get drubbed, they think "we simply don't have the players to compete."  I never thought that way.  When I started out as a youth AC, I worked with a 1st-time header in '97 and another 1st-time header in '98.  Both were terrible.  But when we got beat by teams that I could tell knew what they were doing, I sought out their coaches and started asking them questions.  I never though it was about whether we had good players.  I always thought about why we didn't have good coaches.

--Dave
"If You Want To Have Better Players, Be A Better Coach."

The Mission Statement:
"I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

Offline CoachDP

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #259 on: November 23, 2016, 12:48:31 PM »
And as far as being naive goes, I remember when our org would interview a guy who was applying for an open HC spot in our org.  We were gathered by our commish and told to ask "interview" questions to judge the candidate's quality.  Usually the first or second question asked by one of the "interviewers" was "What offense are you going to run?" followed by various eye rolls and comments about what was answered.  I believe the scheme didn't matter.  What I asked was "How do you teach your scheme?"  "If I were a player, how would you teach me to block or tackle?"  If they were vague or generalized about what/how they do things, I knew he was not a good candidate.

--Dave
« Last Edit: November 23, 2016, 05:01:44 PM by CoachDP »
"If You Want To Have Better Players, Be A Better Coach."

The Mission Statement:
"I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

Offline MHcoach

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #260 on: November 23, 2016, 03:14:56 PM »
DP

I think what happens is most youth coaches think they are only coaching Youth ball so it doesn't matter. Just watching them warm up you can usually tell their level of coaching. The level of discipline in a simple task like walking to the field can often show who will win the game. It's a funny thing that most youth coaches worry more about plays than blocking & tackling.

I remember playing a travel team from Wilmington, it was our first game of the year. They had already played 4 games & their parents thought they were the '71 Dolphins. They had all the warm up gear & traveled with anything & everything you could think of. As my team walked in the parents were commenting " Oh you don't have very many, we will tell our coaches to take it easy on you". I chuckled & politely said we will be ok.

They didn't get a first down, & our team was just physically superior. Afterwards the parents remarked there is no way your running back is 14, I snapped around & said you are right he's only 12. We had taken the game because they were supposed to be the best around, they only lasted a half.

Coaching clearly is a craft, & all crafts need to be worked at. You are either learning or not getting better. Never has a season gone by where I didn't learn something.

Joe 
"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"
Bill Walsh

Offline Dusty Ol Fart

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #261 on: November 23, 2016, 03:51:37 PM »
I think the key term Athlete or Coach is "Passion".  You have to want to!

True Coaching will ruin your ability to simply sit and watch a game as a fan.  You are no longer the "A typical Monday Morning QB".   I find myself looking at the DL Rush or the "Cut Back" in Stretch.  I watch for the key block or whiff.  I watch plays and ask what I would do in similar situations?  Then, I try to shrink it down to my level.  What are "The Basic Elements?"

The same rules apply to Coaches as to Players.  Are you Coachable?   

JMHO
Not MPP... ONE TASK!  Teach them!  :)

Offline user007

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #262 on: November 23, 2016, 07:21:39 PM »
I think the key term Athlete or Coach is "Passion".  You have to want to!

True Coaching will ruin your ability to simply sit and watch a game as a fan.  You are no longer the "A typical Monday Morning QB".   I find myself looking at the DL Rush or the "Cut Back" in Stretch.  I watch for the key block or whiff.  I watch plays and ask what I would do in similar situations?  Then, I try to shrink it down to my level.  What are "The Basic Elements?"

The same rules apply to Coaches as to Players.  Are you Coachable?   

JMHO
It has ruined the fan experience. I can no longer just watch football. I get all excited when I do watch and I see and spot stuff that I know, but I may not have seen before.
15 Study to shew thyself approved unto God, a workman that needeth not to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth.
2 Timothy 2:15

Offline Vince148

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #263 on: November 23, 2016, 08:06:01 PM »
DP

I think what happens is most youth coaches think they are only coaching Youth ball so it doesn't matter. Just watching them warm up you can usually tell their level of coaching. The level of discipline in a simple task like walking to the field can often show who will win the game. It's a funny thing that most youth coaches worry more about plays than blocking & tackling.

Joe 

I may not be a winning coach yet, nor do I have the experience of you or DP, and I am often criticized or condemned because of things I am asking about or trying to understand. However, I can tell you this, I am just as passionate about coaching and I study EVERY day to try to be a better coach. As far as I am concerned, I take coaching youth very serious and to me, it DOES matter. To me, fundamentals matter and discipline matters. When I was asked to coach the group that I coached this year, I was told about how undisciplined they were. They were unruly and didn't listen. But I came in with a plan even to the smallest detail of having them line their helmets up in a straight line when they had a water break. By far, this was the best group of kids that I have ever coached. With just 12-13 kids, these kids were true ironmen and despite our record, they were in every game playing their heart out and never giving up. Yes, it would be nice to be as accomplished as you guys with many winning seasons, but I think what these kids learned this year was much more valuable.

Offline MHcoach

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #264 on: November 23, 2016, 08:46:29 PM »
V

I don't know why you take my post as personal, I certainly wasn't referring to you. You definitely are trying hard to learn your craft. My only advice to you is to watch how a successful team does things. It is very different watching a good team.

Joe
"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"
Bill Walsh

Offline Vince148

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #265 on: November 23, 2016, 09:37:20 PM »
V

I don't know why you take my post as personal, I certainly wasn't referring to you. You definitely are trying hard to learn your craft. My only advice to you is to watch how a successful team does things. It is very different watching a good team.

Joe

Joe, no, I didn't take it personal. I'm sorry if I made it sound that way. I was just stating that I am one youth coach that firmly believes that it does matter even though it is youth ball.

Offline Vikingsfootball

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #266 on: November 23, 2016, 10:41:09 PM »
I talk to many coaches in my area and still talk strategies and how to teach certain things. One thing I stress to my assistants is that we as a staff expect our players to get better so why can't we find better ways to teach the kids

Offline MHcoach

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #267 on: November 24, 2016, 10:32:21 AM »
Here is a great example of exactly what I am talking about. I have a dear friend who is one the smartest football minds I know. Many years he coached our arch rivals, our games were always for first place or the championship. I was very fortunate to win most of them(14-2) I believe. My last season my organization went broke, I had been invited to compete in a National tournament with no way to field a team. My friend's father who was a friend of the family as well told me to bring my team to his organization & they would help raise funds for the trip.

The problem was my friend & I were both HC's, so who would be the HC. His father told me I would be the HC but his son the OC. I agreed as long as he ran my offense. Before we started practice there was several heated discussions on how to do things. Once we started practice he took me aside. " I now know we could never beat you" he told me. Our pace of practice & attention to detail amazed him. He couldn't believe how much work went into running our base play.

He told me afterwards, he learned so much in that one season. He went on to be very successful in HS, & now coaches a semi pro team that has won 3 consecutive National Championships. We are still good friends today.

The point being, I didn't learn to practice the way we did on our own. Rather I learned from some very good coaches. The real secret to becoming a good coach is to watch a good coach.

Joe
"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"
Bill Walsh

Offline Vince148

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #268 on: November 24, 2016, 11:44:05 AM »
The point being, I didn't learn to practice the way we did on our own. Rather I learned from some very good coaches. The real secret to becoming a good coach is to watch a good coach.
Joe

Joe, not taking this personally. Just responding. I certainly agree with you that sitting under a good coach is the best way to learn. However, to me, it's not as easy in youth ball. The biggest difference that I see  between being a HS coach and a youth coach is that most youth coaches like myself work 40+ hours a week. They don't have the time or the resources to be jetting all over the place to try to become a better coach, even if they wanted to. Most high schools that I know of in my area pay for their coaches to attend clinics, etc. It's in their budget. For the youth coach, it's coming out of their own pocket. Everything I have in the way of books and DVDs comes out of my own pocket. Additionally, most youth coaches probably only coach 2-3 years until their son moves to higher levels. When the son moves on, dad is done coaching. Given that, most dads are not going to make the kinds of investment necessary to become a good coach. Coaching youth and HS are two different worlds. It's real easy to tell someone that they should visit other programs when you have a school footing the bill. However, the average dad can't afford to take time off from work to go somewhere on a whim to learn all the fine details of coaching. So at least in my case, I study as much as I can and visit forums like this with the hope that I can pick up little nuggets here and there to increase my knowledge and understanding. Is it the ideal way to learn? Probably not. But for some of us, it's our best option.

Offline MHcoach

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #269 on: November 24, 2016, 12:01:59 PM »
V

When I started I was in the same boat. Here's how I did things:

First, most clinics give discounts to Youth Coaches. Find someone to go with to share expenses. Make the most of your time there to make connections. The is no benefit being "All Lobby Team". Do not go into a session thinking this is a waste of time because it's way above what we do; instead try to get one coaching point or idea.

Next, find ways to fit going to practices of good teams near by that you can fit into your schedule. Is a team practicing on a holiday? If so ask & go watch. Make plans to go watch a nearby college practice in the Spring. Many will have practices scheduled on a weekend. Again ask permission. Try to go to a Pro practice, yes it's a higher level of coaching, but remember you are looking for one thing to learn.

Offer to buy a coach a beer after practice. Most coaches can't refuse a free beer, & you will amazed at you can learn over a beer. When I was a young coach at clinics I always offered to buy a coach a beer.

These are just a few ways to rally learn the craft. Lastly, find a mentor. Most coaches love to talk, I speak to coaches from across the country almost daily.

Joe
"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"
Bill Walsh