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Author Topic: Developing Coaches  (Read 53910 times)

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Offline angalton

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #555 on: December 06, 2016, 11:21:03 AM »
We used zone principles, but also man coverage. We worked on back pedal, three step drop and read, how to turn your hips, stay on your man with a part of your body, look when he looks, but stay in contact with the receiver, catching the ball. They did most of this, except when  they looked for ball they stopped. We worked and worked on this, finally I told them just stay on your man. Make him have to catch the ball when you are in the way. We had four picks, because they threw the ball on shorter routes. Deep routes killed us.
The greatest accomplishment is not in never failing, but in rising again after you fail.

Offline CoachDP

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #556 on: December 06, 2016, 11:23:10 AM »
Our 15 interceptions in 2010, my last year as a youth header:

https://vimeo.com/21935749

--Dave
« Last Edit: December 06, 2016, 11:24:43 AM by CoachDP »
"If You Want To Have Better Players, Be A Better Coach."

The Mission Statement:
"I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

Offline CoachDP

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #557 on: December 06, 2016, 11:26:25 AM »
We used zone principles, but also man coverage. We worked on back pedal, three step drop and read, how to turn your hips, stay on your man with a part of your body, look when he looks, but stay in contact with the receiver, catching the ball. They did most of this, except when  they looked for ball they stopped. We worked and worked on this, finally I told them just stay on your man. Make him have to catch the ball when you are in the way. We had four picks, because they threw the ball on shorter routes. Deep routes killed us.

How old are they?

--Dave
"If You Want To Have Better Players, Be A Better Coach."

The Mission Statement:
"I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

Offline angalton

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #558 on: December 06, 2016, 11:33:18 AM »
11 and 12 years old. We had 6 kids play up a year out of 18 kids. Believe it or not they were the better players on the team. Also had a girl, who actually played extremely well. 12 year old division. Backs and backers were smaller on my team than all others. Lineman same as rest of the others teams, but only had 5.
The greatest accomplishment is not in never failing, but in rising again after you fail.

Offline Michael

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #559 on: December 06, 2016, 11:35:04 AM »
If they're making all those mistakes, I don't see why they should be confident.

So many coaches seem to act like all their team needs is a big jug of water and a bunch of scoops of "Confidence in a Can."  I've had teams win a lot of stuff, and we never worked on their confidence, other than pointing out when they'd just done something they hadn't thought they could do.  I love facing teams whose coaches think their team's major problem is a lack of confidence.
“If you can't explain it to a six-year-old, you don't understand it yourself.” ― Albert Einstein

Offline CoachDP

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #560 on: December 06, 2016, 11:35:48 AM »
finally I told them just stay on your man. Make him have to catch the ball when you are in the way.

Did this work better?

--Dave
"If You Want To Have Better Players, Be A Better Coach."

The Mission Statement:
"I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

Offline angalton

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #561 on: December 06, 2016, 11:37:59 AM »
Did this work better?

--Dave

No, we practiced so long doing it the other way, they would still stop. When they did do it the new way, yes it worked great.
The greatest accomplishment is not in never failing, but in rising again after you fail.

Offline CoachDP

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #562 on: December 06, 2016, 11:38:55 AM »
we never worked on their confidence, other than pointing out when they'd just done something they hadn't thought they could do.

True enough.  Building confidence is sometimes nothing more than pointing out what they are achieving.  We never worked to build our player's confidence.  It was a by-product of them meeting the expectations that we had set.

--Dave
"If You Want To Have Better Players, Be A Better Coach."

The Mission Statement:
"I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

Offline CoachDP

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #563 on: December 06, 2016, 11:40:03 AM »
No, we practiced so long doing it the other way, they would still stop. When they did do it the new way, yes it worked great.

Huh?  So which is it?  Did or didn't?

--Dave
"If You Want To Have Better Players, Be A Better Coach."

The Mission Statement:
"I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

Offline Michael

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #564 on: December 06, 2016, 11:41:14 AM »
Huh?  So which is it?  Did or didn't?

--Dave

Sounds like a halfcourt shot.  When you shoot it right, it always goes in.  However, people almost never shoot it right.
“If you can't explain it to a six-year-old, you don't understand it yourself.” ― Albert Einstein

Offline CoachDP

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #565 on: December 06, 2016, 12:35:39 PM »
I do believe I know what I have to fix in my coaching. I will be curious at looking at this at the end of next year. This is a fine example of what you do not want to happen. Coach Potter thanks, I truly believe where I have gone astray.

Keep in mind that when I started as a header, I wasn't confident.  But I didn't lack in confidence, either.  I just had no track record, so I didn't know if what I did would work, or not.  I tried unconventional things.  In my first full season as a youth header, we went 5-3. And unfortunately, I used the games to experiment and try things.  (i.e., How successful will we be if I go with my best 11 on offense and sub only on defense?  How successful will we be if I go with my best 11 on defense and sub only on offense?  How successful will I be if we get all of our subbing out of the way in the 1st Half?  Or wait until the 2nd Half?) I tried all of these approaches to see what would happen.  Each game was a new experiment.  And while I started to develop theories on what worked best for me, the team's record suffered as a result.  Game day is not the time to be experimenting.  But I had no one to help.  The other headers in our org were as inexperienced as I was.  There was no internet.  I didn't even know that clinics existed.  As a result, we beat the teams that were worse than us and lost to the teams that had better coaching or better talent or both.  But I'd vowed not to beat myself; no penalties or turnovers because those were under our control.  And we worked on fundies.  I knew next to nothing about scheme.  So we snapped the ball to the QB over and over again.  Plays weren't run in a game until I was confident in how we repped the play.  Like Lombardi's sweep, I repped everything over and over.  And with so little X and O knowledge, we spent most of our time on blocking and tackling.  Equipped with what I learned from that first season, I reviewed all of my game film over and over (and over and over) again; to see where I'd lost games.  To see where we'd won games.  To see what we did well and what we didn't do well.  I compiled a stat book on everything we did.  So by my second season, I knew how many possessions and plays we'd likely get in a game.  What I thought our chances were for recovering an onsides kick.  What was our percentage of winning if we scored first?  If we lead at halftime?  I wasn't "confident" but I believed each game was winnable.  The next 93 games we played were.  So in Year 2, not having enough success to be "confident" in what I was doing, I prepared for each game like it was The Super Bowl.  I was excited every day about getting to practice.  We over-prepared.  I scouted every opponent and every Monday was the beginning of "Championship Week."  We went 8-0 and never trailed in any game.

Our Second Season:

(w) 19-6
(w) 24-6
(w) 32-6
(w) 30-0
(w) 33-0
(w) 36-0
(w) 40-0
(w) 27-6

It's the only season that I can look back on and remember every game and the score (this was 16 years ago) because of how thorough and fastidious I was about every little thing.  I was so concerned that I'd overlooked some detail that would expose our achilles heel.  And I'd quickly learned how unforgiving parents can be when you don't win every game.  So I can understand that we may not necessarily start out with confidence in our coaching skills and knowledge.  But to make up for what I didn't know (which was a lot), I worked as hard as I could on what I had available to me.

--Dave
« Last Edit: December 06, 2016, 12:50:58 PM by CoachDP »
"If You Want To Have Better Players, Be A Better Coach."

The Mission Statement:
"I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

Offline angalton

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #566 on: December 06, 2016, 12:40:37 PM »
Huh?  So which is it?  Did or didn't?

--Dave
Yes it worked.
The greatest accomplishment is not in never failing, but in rising again after you fail.

Offline mahonz

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #567 on: December 06, 2016, 12:50:50 PM »
11 and 12 years old. We had 6 kids play up a year out of 18 kids. Believe it or not they were the better players on the team. Also had a girl, who actually played extremely well. 12 year old division. Backs and backers were smaller on my team than all others. Lineman same as rest of the others teams, but only had 5.

Tip-

Man means you play the player and not the play. Zone means you play the play and not the player. The kids seems to understand this meaning when to watch the QB and when to watch their man.

I'd also study up on catch man. Zone turns to Man in 2 seconds or less.

We have been mixing coverage's now for the past 17 games with 12/13 year olds. Really tough to pass the football but you have to be careful with your run support. Got ourselves in a few pickles along the way.
Collect moments, not wins.

Offline angalton

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #568 on: December 06, 2016, 12:57:31 PM »
If they're making all those mistakes, I don't see why they should be confident.

So many coaches seem to act like all their team needs is a big jug of water and a bunch of scoops of "Confidence in a Can."  I've had teams win a lot of stuff, and we never worked on their confidence, other than pointing out when they'd just done something they hadn't thought they could do.  I love facing teams whose coaches think their team's major problem is a lack of confidence.

Not looking for a magic pill. Just trying to make myself the coach my players need. Confidence to not over think and to know you can win. Why all the errors? 2' splits, recessed line(head even with centers hip), FB 3.5' behind QB, HBs 1 step back and one step over from fullback, QB which way to open and how, QB not dropping his hands on the snap, etc. Every game they would not do any of these things. Whose fault? Mine. Because I could not get this to be second nature. Practice was fine, games they totally had mind melts. 8 run plays and 3 pass plays with 3 formations. Not an overload at all. Practice was fundamentals for 25 minutes, group for 45 minutes and team for 25 minutes.
The greatest accomplishment is not in never failing, but in rising again after you fail.

Offline angalton

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #569 on: December 06, 2016, 01:04:11 PM »
Tip-

Man means you play the player and not the play. Zone means you play the play and not the player. The kids seems to understand this meaning when to watch the QB and when to watch their man.

I'd also study up on catch man. Zone turns to Man in 2 seconds or less.

We have been mixing coverage's now for the past 17 games with 12/13 year olds. Really tough to pass the football but you have to be careful with your run support. Got ourselves in a few pickles along the way.
Once my Corner made an out call, it was only a couple of seconds before he was in man.
The greatest accomplishment is not in never failing, but in rising again after you fail.