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Author Topic: Developing Coaches  (Read 54161 times)

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Offline Dusty Ol Fart

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #60 on: December 26, 2015, 09:31:33 PM »
Rob:

I have no issues with setting high expectations.

Minimum Game Goals.  3 TD's on Offense.  1 TD from Defense, One from Special Teams.  ZERO Penalties.  3 Takeaways (Fumbles/INT), 3 and out! 

Notice my em-phasis is on the Defensive Sy-la-ble! 

Yet! Perspective MUST BE maintained!   I dont honestly expect my 13 year old QB to be Brady or Manning.  I dont expect my RB's to be Lynch or Forte.  Yada, Yada, Yada.  I do expect their best every play!  I do expect them to recover after a bad play!  I do expect them to "Own It!

If they can honestly analyze themselves after the game, I have reached my goals! 

Win or Lose. If they cant tell you, in some detail, what was good and bad, then I suggest they don't know what the right thing is!   And that AINT THEIR FAULT!  ;)   


   

Not MPP... ONE TASK!  Teach them!  :)

Online mahonz

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #61 on: December 26, 2015, 10:14:31 PM »
Rob:

I have no issues with setting high expectations.

Minimum Game Goals.  3 TD's on Offense.  1 TD from Defense, One from Special Teams.  ZERO Penalties.  3 Takeaways (Fumbles/INT), 3 and out! 

Notice my em-phasis is on the Defensive Sy-la-ble! 

Yet! Perspective MUST BE maintained!   I dont honestly expect my 13 year old QB to be Brady or Manning.  I dont expect my RB's to be Lynch or Forte.  Yada, Yada, Yada.  I do expect their best every play!  I do expect them to recover after a bad play!  I do expect them to "Own It!

If they can honestly analyze themselves after the game, I have reached my goals! 

Win or Lose. If they cant tell you, in some detail, what was good and bad, then I suggest they don't know what the right thing is!   And that AINT THEIR FAULT!  ;)   


 

S

Good to see you farting dust again.  :)
Collect moments, not wins.

Offline PSLCOACHROB

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #62 on: December 26, 2015, 10:20:55 PM »
Oh, don't get me wrong. I don't think my players can be Tom Brady or any other NFL great. I just want them to try to be. I won't ever fault them for not achieving some crazy goal set by me. They can't be Lawrence Taylor or John Hannah(I had to mention a lineman  :P ) at their age and most likely they can never approach that even when they get older. But lets give it a try and be happy with the results. I think we're on the same page.

Online mahonz

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #63 on: December 26, 2015, 10:26:44 PM »
Oh, don't get me wrong. I don't think my players can be Tom Brady or any other NFL great. I just want them to try to be. I won't ever fault them for not achieving some crazy goal set by me. They can't be Lawrence Taylor or John Hannah(I had to mention a lineman  :P ) at their age and most likely they can never approach that even when they get older. But lets give it a try and be happy with the results. I think we're on the same page.

R

Drives me nuts when they look at you all confused when you mention John Hannah and Lawrence Taylor.  :P
Collect moments, not wins.

Offline PSLCOACHROB

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #64 on: December 26, 2015, 10:32:24 PM »
R

Drives me nuts when they look at you all confused when you mention John Hannah and Lawrence Taylor.  :P
I think most of them recognize LT but have no real idea of what he did. I don't give speeches much about players(or anything else for that matter) but when Ido talk about players for whatever reason I am sure to reference the current stars. I find often than not many of the kids don't recognize those names either.

Offline Dusty Ol Fart

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #65 on: December 26, 2015, 11:49:44 PM »
Trust me: Except for the Coca, Hookers, and otherwise idiotic behavior, my kids can emulate LT!

Or not!  Please choose Not! 
 ::)
Not MPP... ONE TASK!  Teach them!  :)

Offline PSLCOACHROB

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #66 on: December 27, 2015, 12:48:49 AM »
And I must add that while I may talk about doing my best to get them to achieve their absolute pinnacle of performance, my best is often, maybe usually, subpar.

Offline angalton

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #67 on: December 28, 2015, 09:17:07 AM »
I do not know any of my friends or people that want to coach. I get dads who coach because their son plays football. That is how I started, now can't imagine not coaching. I am the only one that goes to clinics, watches video, studies football, etc. As little as I know, I feel as though I talk over their heads. I try to paint an over all picture and then break it down into smaller segments. I am not good enough to watch everything, but that happens quite a lot. To many times coaches are watching the ball carrier or their son. The kids pour their hearts into playing to win. To think otherwise is absurd. I guess I want to know is, how do you get the asst. coaches to buy in and take teaching seriously? They care, but are disconnected of being a student of the game. The kids are going to do what we teach. If I could get the asst. to look at the details, the kids would learn so much more. Is there a "trick" to get guys to learn the intricacies of teaching football? I call my problem " Madden Syndrome ".
The greatest accomplishment is not in never failing, but in rising again after you fail.

Online MHcoach

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #68 on: December 28, 2015, 11:40:40 AM »
I do not know any of my friends or people that want to coach. I get dads who coach because their son plays football. That is how I started, now can't imagine not coaching. I am the only one that goes to clinics, watches video, studies football, etc. As little as I know, I feel as though I talk over their heads. I try to paint an over all picture and then break it down into smaller segments. I am not good enough to watch everything, but that happens quite a lot. To many times coaches are watching the ball carrier or their son. The kids pour their hearts into playing to win. To think otherwise is absurd. I guess I want to know is, how do you get the asst. coaches to buy in and take teaching seriously? They care, but are disconnected of being a student of the game. The kids are going to do what we teach. If I could get the asst. to look at the details, the kids would learn so much more. Is there a "trick" to get guys to learn the intricacies of teaching football? I call my problem " Madden Syndrome ".
A

You are describing the same situation most coaches have. This is exactly what I am trying to make better with this post. In order to be successful a team needs at least 2 coaches that understand what is going, & then 1 or 2 good soldiers. Now how to accomplish this takes work. I was fortunate in Mint Hill to have several guys who were football obsessed. We also had "Dads" who were our good soldiers.

Having meetings in the off season where we discussed various parts of our scheme & our teaching methods really made the difference. There was no way to get them to clinics, that was my thing. Thankfully they liked my baking so they would show for meetings. Even if you do it once a month at a local establishment it will help.

There isn't a football team in America that doesn't believe it isn't working hard, nor doesn't want to win. The question is are they willing to do what it takes to win. Every team we played against in Youth ball was practicing 4-5 times a week, while we practiced twice. Many having 3 hour long practices, ours were always 1 hour & 55 minutes. The difference was the pace & organization to accompany great scheme. We never told our players to do anything we drilled them.

Running drills properly is the big issue. I have seen coaches attempting to run the exact same drills we do, only to have a nightmare. The biggest issue is they want to add & change the drill. Next there is no enthusiasm or energy. I have watched DC doing the most boring drills with high energy where it wasn't boring. This is often why I tell coaches to go watch a good team practice.

I hope all these posts help.

Joe
"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"
Bill Walsh

Offline angalton

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #69 on: December 28, 2015, 12:14:39 PM »
Thanks Joe

 I am sure my situation is typical. I end up combining drills, because going thru the motions don't accomplish our goals. That way I can try and accomplish multiple things at once. Assistants dont understand the importants of details or dont get the details. Good enough is not the same as right and wrong. I am all over the place and it hurts us as a team. I don't mind being exhausted, but it is unnecessary. I start are season in March. No one shows until the weak before the season. It is very time consuming to teach coaches when I need to be teaching my players. I end up doing it my self as team time. Hope things change for the better. I have a couple new coaches approach me and ask to help. 1 says he has started studying. He has my hand outs from last year, because he ask for them. I love food and to cook, but still no buyers. Hope for change and prepare for status quo. I believe these are the reasons for our success at the end of the seasons. We lose to non play off teams at beginning and beat playoff teams at the end. I am taking to long to reach our goals.
The greatest accomplishment is not in never failing, but in rising again after you fail.

Offline bigshel

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #70 on: December 28, 2015, 02:28:57 PM »
A

Running drills properly is the big issue. I have seen coaches attempting to run the exact same drills we do, only to have a nightmare. The biggest issue is they want to add & change the drill. Next there is no enthusiasm or energy. I have watched DC doing the most boring drills with high energy where it wasn't boring. This is often why I tell coaches to go watch a good team practice.I hope all these posts help.

Joe


Joe,

This is such an overlooked part of coaching. This was the reason I started filming drills at practice with my ipad, so that I could give coaches feedback. It helps for the coaches to see film of themselves coaching, as much as players need to see what they need to correct as far as execution. As far as I'm concerned, we can't blame the players for lack of execution if we aren't executing as coaches.

Another thing that I notice, at least with youth coaches, is that they will give up on a drill too quickly; that is, if the kids don't execute the drill perfectly right away, the coach will decide that it "doesn't work" or "they can't do it", rather than keeping with it for a number of practices in order to let the players develop the skill necessary to execute the drill properly. It's like anything else - the more you do a thing, the better you get at it.

Online MHcoach

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #71 on: December 28, 2015, 02:35:56 PM »
Thanks Joe

 I am sure my situation is typical. I end up combining drills, because going thru the motions don't accomplish our goals. That way I can try and accomplish multiple things at once. Assistants dont understand the importants of details or dont get the details. Good enough is not the same as right and wrong. I am all over the place and it hurts us as a team. I don't mind being exhausted, but it is unnecessary. I start are season in March. No one shows until the weak before the season. It is very time consuming to teach coaches when I need to be teaching my players. I end up doing it my self as team time. Hope things change for the better. I have a couple new coaches approach me and ask to help. 1 says he has started studying. He has my hand outs from last year, because he ask for them. I love food and to cook, but still no buyers. Hope for change and prepare for status quo. I believe these are the reasons for our success at the end of the seasons. We lose to non play off teams at beginning and beat playoff teams at the end. I am taking to long to reach our goals.


A

I thoroughly understand exactly this position. It becomes easier to do it yourself than have an AC screw it up. Many coaches have that mentality, unfortunately that very mentality is what hurts a team.

Here is my advice take it or leave it, but it effeminately applies to you & many others here. First, find 1 AC you can trust & is willing to commit to doing things the way you want. Then let him coach while you teach the others. It has to start somewhere. Do not worry so much if the coach you trust is a young guy, just that he is willing to listen & learn. Your staff will build from there but you must let them coach & get better too. Rome wasn't built in a day, neither are football teams.

Joe
"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"
Bill Walsh

Offline Michael

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #72 on: December 28, 2015, 02:49:56 PM »
https://www.t-nation.com/training/gable-method

Chris [Long] shared Gable's coaching method with me:

"If it is important, do it every day. If it's not important, don't do it at all."

You know, it's hard to argue with this... but we all do anyway! I've spent the best part of the last three decades asking coaches from every discipline this question: "What are the three keys to winning in your sport?" I have yet to find a coach that can't name the three. From "making free throws when tired" to simply "turn the right foot," coach after coach after coach has had a clear vision of what it takes to win.

Then I ask two follow-up questions:

1. Do your athletes know this?

2. Do you practice these every day?

Never, not even once, has a coach answered "yes" to both. It's not that the coaches are ignorant of this little paradox ("This is my formula for winning but nobody but me seems to know it") rather, they're stuck finding a place or time in practice to ensure the keys are addressed.
“If you can't explain it to a six-year-old, you don't understand it yourself.” ― Albert Einstein

Online MHcoach

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #73 on: December 28, 2015, 02:56:06 PM »
Joe,

This is such an overlooked part of coaching. This was the reason I started filming drills at practice with my ipad, so that I could give coaches feedback. It helps for the coaches to see film of themselves coaching, as much as players need to see what they need to correct as far as execution. As far as I'm concerned, we can't blame the players for lack of execution if we aren't executing as coaches.

Another thing that I notice, at least with youth coaches, is that they will give up on a drill too quickly; that is, if the kids don't execute the drill perfectly right away, the coach will decide that it "doesn't work" or "they can't do it", rather than keeping with it for a number of practices in order to let the players develop the skill necessary to execute the drill properly. It's like anything else - the more you do a thing, the better you get at it.


S

It's funny I was having this very conversation with Michael earlier today. At the start of every season I wail & whine how bad our team is, because they are. Day 2 we are just a little better but still stink. It grows each day. I can't tell you how often I hear about not being able to coach fundamentals because we don't have the time to teach plays. That is ridiculously backwards.

You can't tell Johnny to run with the ball "High & Tight". You have to coach him. When we were in Brooklyn my teams would always get our butts whipped in the first scrimmage. When we played that same team in the season we would thrash them. Reason we got better & they didn't.

Joe
"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"
Bill Walsh

Offline Michael

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Re: Developing Coaches
« Reply #74 on: December 28, 2015, 03:00:48 PM »

You can't tell Johnny to run with the ball "High & Tight". You have to coach him.


Are you sure that's right?  From what I've seen, you wait until he fumbles and then say, "Hey, you gotta HOLD ON to that ball."
“If you can't explain it to a six-year-old, you don't understand it yourself.” ― Albert Einstein