Author Topic: Learning the Coxbox offense  (Read 2625 times)

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Offline SmakAtak

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Re: Learning the Coxbox offense
« Reply #30 on: April 13, 2018, 02:33:28 PM »
The playbook you posted was purchased from Coach Cox and shouldn't be posted for public consumption unless you have his permission. I know this because of the pdf stamp that is on the document.

It's the first link that shows up under "CoxBox Offense" if you do a google search on it.  I didn't make some private resource available to him.  I just showed him the location of a public resource.  Take it up with the guy who has it online and search engine optimized to show us as the #1 link when you search for it.

Offline gumby_in_co

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Re: Learning the Coxbox offense
« Reply #31 on: April 13, 2018, 05:04:11 PM »
L

This is one of the reasons I time our QB's release. I actually have video where our LG slips & whiffs on a 1 tech, & we complete a Slant before he gets there.

Empty for us means 5 man Protections only. We usually use a man scheme with the QB responsible for #6. Most times from Empty we have concepts that are Quicks. Here is an example: Double Slants to the 2 man side, Stick to 3 man side. So the Slants become a presnap Read, & the Stick post snap.

Joe

I'm sold. I quit complaining about 5 man blocking early last Fall. We tell our QB which receiver and which route, so he has no read. It's just a matter of someone on the sideline taking a quick look at the box before dialing up a 6, 7, 8 or 9.
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Offline 32wedge

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Re: Learning the Coxbox offense
« Reply #32 on: April 15, 2018, 05:37:16 PM »
It's just a matter of someone on the sideline taking a quick look at the box before dialing up a 6, 7, 8 or 9.

Are 6, 7, 8 and 9 receiver numbers?  Routes?

Being able signal in a specific hot route from the sideline would have been big for us last year.  I want to add this.  Any info on how you communicate this at the line with your QB would be greatly appreciated.  Thanks.

Offline MHcoach

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Re: Learning the Coxbox offense
« Reply #33 on: April 16, 2018, 01:29:21 PM »
32

6= Comeback
7= Corner
8 = Post
9 = Go

That's in our tree, different places use different tree's.

There are a 1000 different ways to use alerts. Simplest way is to single a change. Another is to have a set call. IE. XRAY alerts the X to a Slant. The real issue is to have the QB & Receiver be able to identify when & what route. A few seasons ago we had a receiver who is now a Big 10 star. We would play X games with him. He would hand signal the route to the QB. If the QB liked it we took it, otherwise we would have a concept to the other side.

Hope that helps.

Joe
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Offline 32wedge

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Re: Learning the Coxbox offense
« Reply #34 on: April 16, 2018, 02:34:30 PM »
32

6= Comeback
7= Corner
8 = Post
9 = Go

That's in our tree, different places use different tree's.

There are a 1000 different ways to use alerts. Simplest way is to single a change. Another is to have a set call. IE. XRAY alerts the X to a Slant. The real issue is to have the QB & Receiver be able to identify when & what route. A few seasons ago we had a receiver who is now a Big 10 star. We would play X games with him. He would hand signal the route to the QB. If the QB liked it we took it, otherwise we would have a concept to the other side.

Hope that helps.

Joe

Thanks Joe.  I appreciate any input you give.

Teaching a QB to audible routes at the line is a little more sophisticated than I am comfortable with.  My passing game is prehistoric compared to yours.  It consists of 3 PAPs: sweep pass (sprint out with a high/low read), a backside TE pop, and a slant on backside from motion.  Then we have maybe 2 quick pocket passes: HITCHES and ALL GOs.

I think Gumby was suggesting reading the coverage and making the call from the sideline.  I am just wondering if he has a specific signal for each receiver or if the specific hot route is built in to the play call.

I signal in my formation.  The team aligns.  I scope the defense and signal the play to my QB.  He audibly calls the coded wrist coach grid location of the play.  When everyone is set, he calls the cadence.  Now if I have a WR way out there by himself and the CB is playing 8 yards off of him and I call a slant route, what is the best way to communicate to the QB to go straight to that slant route?  That's basically what I'm trying to figure out.

Online GP

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Re: Learning the Coxbox offense
« Reply #35 on: April 16, 2018, 02:37:06 PM »
Now if I have a WR way out there by himself and the CB is playing 8 yards off of him and I call a slant route, what is the best way to communicate to the QB to go straight to that slant route?  That's basically what I'm trying to figure out.

R4  8)
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Offline Dusty Ol Fart

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Re: Learning the Coxbox offense
« Reply #36 on: April 16, 2018, 04:06:27 PM »
Now if I have a WR way out there by himself and the CB is playing 8 yards off of him and I call a slant route, what is the best way to communicate to the QB to go straight to that slant route?

The Smart Ass in me says

"Hey Jimmy, throw it to Steve on a Slant!"    ;D
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Offline 32wedge

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Re: Learning the Coxbox offense
« Reply #37 on: April 16, 2018, 04:11:11 PM »
Now if I have a WR way out there by himself and the CB is playing 8 yards off of him and I call a slant route, what is the best way to communicate to the QB to go straight to that slant route?

The Smart Ass in me says

"Hey Jimmy, throw it to Steve on a Slant!"    ;D

Finally, Something I can understand!   ;D

Offline MHcoach

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Re: Learning the Coxbox offense
« Reply #38 on: April 16, 2018, 04:12:26 PM »
32

Here is the thing, if you teach them to take it every time then you have to live with them taking it on 3rd & 1. Great when it works but you're an idiot when it doesn't. At the HS level yes our Passing Game is a lot more sophisticated, that still doesn't mean we teach it in absolutes. This is why we call RPO's with "the short take it if it's there" built in.

At the Youth level a simple hand signal or call is the easy way to do it.

When Coach Davis introduced us all to the RnS, throwing the uncovered receiver was an absolute. We have evolved a long way from there. Since you are UBSW guy, you too can evolve. Having a "Gift" throw can be a very simple call. In our system the "Gift" is the Hitch. We complete Hitch at a very high level, which is why we don't ever see off coverage. In order to be able to have a simple call for Hitch or Slant you have to be able to complete it at a high level. If not then you are wasting a play.

Joe
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Offline Dusty Ol Fart

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Re: Learning the Coxbox offense
« Reply #39 on: April 16, 2018, 04:20:16 PM »
To Joe's point I am working on a similar (Auto Route) concept with the Slot based on Inside or Outside alignment of the Defender.  Essentially meaning that every play is "Play Action"

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Online blockandtackle

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Re: Learning the Coxbox offense
« Reply #40 on: April 16, 2018, 04:25:07 PM »
To Joe's point I am working on a similar (Auto Route) concept with the Slot based on Inside or Outside alignment of the Defender.  Essentially meaning that every play is "Play Action"

Something like run a slant if the defender's outside, run an out if the defender's inside, and run a hitch if he's way off could work well... but the outside guy would need to make sure he's going vertical (on a fade or something) to clear it out over there if the receiver breaks out.

You could also simply have the inside guy run a bubble screen and just tell your QB to throw the bubble when the overhang on the slot's out of position to tackle him.

Offline MHcoach

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Re: Learning the Coxbox offense
« Reply #41 on: April 16, 2018, 04:32:45 PM »


You could also simply have the inside guy run a bubble screen and just tell your QB to throw the bubble when the overhang on the slot's out of position to tackle him.

This was Florida's offense under Coach Meyer. They came to the LOS with 4 plays called, looked at the WSILB & his position determined what they ran. IZ, Bubble, Slants or QB Iso. So no matter where he aligned he was in a bad spot to defend the play.

Joe
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Offline 32wedge

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Re: Learning the Coxbox offense
« Reply #42 on: April 16, 2018, 04:38:59 PM »
32

Here is the thing, if you teach them to take it every time then you have to live with them taking it on 3rd & 1. Great when it works but you're an idiot when it doesn't. At the HS level yes our Passing Game is a lot more sophisticated, that still doesn't mean we teach it in absolutes. This is why we call RPO's with "the short take it if it's there" built in.

At the Youth level a simple hand signal or call is the easy way to do it.

When Coach Davis introduced us all to the RnS, throwing the uncovered receiver was an absolute. We have evolved a long way from there. Since you are UBSW guy, you too can evolve. Having a "Gift" throw can be a very simple call. In our system the "Gift" is the Hitch. We complete Hitch at a very high level, which is why we don't ever see off coverage. In order to be able to have a simple call for Hitch or Slant you have to be able to complete it at a high level. If not then you are wasting a play.

Joe

Thanks. 

We have to evolve and throw the ball better or we will never compete with the top couple of teams on our schedule.  They bring all eleven up in the box and overwhelm us with more size and speed than we can field.  We burned them a few times but not enough.  I am going to emphasize getting the ball out with short easy passes.  If we can get them to respect our passing, we will have a chance.

I am not strictly UBSW.  I run full flow and half spin from multiple formations, balanced and unbalanced, tight or split, twin slots and trips to either side. But if it is working, I am happy to run double tight unbalanced off tackle all game, so I get to keep my single wing card.

Running the ball with the single wing has been so easy most of the time that I have neglected passing.  I want to evolve that part of coaching.

Offline Dusty Ol Fart

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Re: Learning the Coxbox offense
« Reply #43 on: April 16, 2018, 04:42:47 PM »
Plan on using it to "Assist" with the Read.  If we can bait that kid to chase the route the QB should have a lot of "Open space" to navigate.  Especially if we connect on that Bubble a few times. 

However, we had a lot of trouble translating Paper to Grass last season.  A lot of issues running the same play the same way twice.  Hopefully some of that will be eliminated this season.  They could walk it and draw it but when we went live the "Lights Went Out". 

Since I already expect a bit of the same, I have prepared a bit differently this year.

   



 
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Online GP

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Re: Learning the Coxbox offense
« Reply #44 on: April 16, 2018, 04:49:18 PM »
What R4 does is provide your QB with a clear process to make those decisions pre and post snap. Eliminates the need to yell (pre-snap) "Hey Jimmy, throw it to Steve on a Slant!" More importantly, eliminates the need to yell (post-snap) "SHIT! OLB dropped! Do NOT throw to Jimmy on the Slant!"

Also, while the R4 system provides for three passing options (Rhythm, Read & Rush) prior to Release, you don't HAVE to use them all on every concept (and in youth, you shouldn't).

So 32 - on All Hitch, you could simply teach your QB to use a 1) Rhythm (presnap) to 2) Release (post-snap) progression. In other words, your QB presnap determines which receiver has the best matchup / leverage (ie Jimmy is my best receiver + his guy is playing 8 yards off = Jimmy is the Rhythm). QB takes his 3 step drop (1 from Gun), hinges & throws to Jimmy. Jimmy ain't open post-snap for whatever reason (CB rolls up, LB drops, etc.), QB releases (runs)!

A lot of people seem to make it way more complicated than it needs to be. It really can be very simple.

Also, once your QB understands WHY you want him to throw the Slant to Jimmy when the Corner is 8 off with outside leverage, he'll be more confident in your system. He'll make the throw w more confidence and you won't need to micromanage the process - both of which pay dividends against better opponents as the season goes on.

I've watched Maddox give clinics and go over examples where he called plays expecting someone to be open but R4 dictated the QB throw to someone else and the result was a 70 yard TD instead of perhaps a 6 yard completion. Seen it play out in our system as well.

No different than managing employees. Micromanaging the hell out of quality employees only stunts their growth / confidence and creates dissatisfaction. Doesn't mean you let them make ALL the decisions but empower your QB in this way and he will reward you.
« Last Edit: April 16, 2018, 04:52:43 PM by GP »
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