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Author Topic: Coaching aggression  (Read 8672 times)

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Offline COCoachKC

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #15 on: March 15, 2018, 12:13:49 PM »
The reason why we "look for things" in kids as opposed to coaching things in kids is time. Dp, you make a great point but on a youth level your limited by the county as to the allowable time you have with your team each week. In my area it's 6 hrs. Your also potentially limited by a small coaching staff or having more dad's who are helping vs real coaches. "Finding" a kid who has a talent to play QB, C, or WR before the coaching begins speeds up the process significantly as the investment becomes more affordable. So I guess we may agree to disagree on that one.

When I was coaching, we always did some "testing" day one.  The next few days of practice, while still in shorts and t's, we would run through our blocking circuit.  The goal was to try and "place" players based on innate abilities before getting to individual drills and installs.  For example, if one of the bigger kids on the team scores high in the pro agility and is one of the best at executing  aggressively the seal, kickout and log blocks, we were pretty confident that we had a strong candidate for quick guard (our pulling guard).  If he was under patch weight, he may also make a good fullback.  The overall goal was to place players into positions where their God given abilities would possibly lessen the coaching effort and, hopefully, increase their levels of confidence and success on the field.  Were we ever wrong?  Absolutely!  Of course, the majority of the kids wouldn't cleanly fall into a given set of positions.  But we had to start somewhere.

Is this kind of what you mean by "looking for things"?

Kent



Online ZACH

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #16 on: March 15, 2018, 12:20:25 PM »
Interesting. I teach them that "we hit to hurt" and "we're looking to hurt people".

Yeaaaa ... i had to explain this to a lot of parents after i was qouted...

My pc version... "we hit people to knock them down"

Probably why im retiring from youth... but i digress
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Offline Seabass

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #17 on: March 15, 2018, 12:42:55 PM »
Honestly, it's probably just semantics, but I don't want to coach kids to be "aggressive."  I want to coach them to be "physical" and "tenacious."  The difference is that "aggressive" might cause parents to flip out or even sue, but "physical" and "tenacious" is just part of the game.

As an OL coach, I want my kids to get off the ball with proper footwork and leverage, make good contact with proper hand/head/shoulder placement, and finish the block with "tenacity."  What I've found helps develop those things:

1.)  Weightroom--I coach HS.  Not many youth coaches have access to this and that's ok, but at our level it's vital.  If you get a kid conditioned to squatting 400+lbs and stressing his central nervous system with 500lb deadlifts, asking him to go toe to toe with a guy across from him doesn't feel like such a big deal.

2.)  Detailed teaching broken into small steps--coach it all little by little and take your time, then put it together in chunks, then put it together against bags, then put it together against bodies.  Then do that all over again until it's automatic.

3.)  Simple scheme--Confident players are better players.  Confused players are tentative.  If you know who to block, you can get to him faster and better.

4.)  Physical acclimation.  The first time I got in a fight in Kindergarten and got punched in the mouth, I didn't know what to do.  All I knew about fighting was from movies where it was choreographed and slow.  But I grew up fighting all through school, so I learned pretty quickly that it wasn't such a big deal to get hit and that I needed to just shrug it off and take the fight to the other guy so I wouldn't get my own tail whipped.  The same concept applies here.  It's crucial to work against live bodies just to develop a tolerance and feel for contact.

We all need to limit contact and only have so much practice time, but I see coaches hit bags and sleds or have their OL always work on air and then they get upset and pull their hair out when their kids are soft and confused as to who or how to block.  It shouldn't be a mystery.  That doesn't mean you need to beat each other up all practice and tackle to the ground, but you do need to go all out in limited, controlled situations with a quick whistle.  This is what individual and group periods are great for.

The most physical teams I've ever coached had the entire team line up and do 5 minutes of quick board drills a day, every day, until the season started and then we still had them do that once a week.  We had an All-State QB with D1 offers getting in there and mixing it up with the WRs and DBs one-on-one in the same board drills as our OL and DL.  It really helped teach kids to not be contact shy and to compete in physical contests.

"Agressive" and "Physical"......definitely semantics in this case. There is nothing about being physical that isn't aggressive.

Your 4 point process to achieving your physicality (which are all spot on) are all about creating confidence.

Offline Coach Correa

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #18 on: March 15, 2018, 12:44:12 PM »
I'm jumpin in on this 1 soon as i'm off work !!!!
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Offline Michael

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #19 on: March 15, 2018, 12:50:33 PM »
I had two kids get in a fight after the supposedly-really-good one got pancaked on an O-Line drill by a supposedly-not-very-good one.  I was the only one who had them ranked the right way, by the way.  Anyway, we had a meeting of the coaches and the parents of the two kids two days or so later (not my idea).  I had a mom yell at me, "You made them like this!"

I should probably put that on my football resume if I ever make one.
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Online gumby_in_co

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #20 on: March 15, 2018, 12:51:23 PM »
Yeaaaa ... i had to explain this to a lot of parents after i was qouted...

My pc version... "we hit people to knock them down"

Probably why im retiring from youth... but i digress

As I said, I am careful about explaining the difference between hurt and injured. We NEVER want to injure anyone.

I haven't been questioned by a parent about this, but if I ever was . . . YOU (the parent) signed your son up for football. Hopefully for the child's sake, you did this with your eyes open and armed with some knowledge. If not, at least armed with some questions. The game is the game. It is fast and violent and favors the predators. There are teams out there who bring bad intentions at every snap. We intend on being the apex predator among those teams.

To the parents of our opponents? Yes. We are teaching our players to hurt your son. We intend on melting your precious little snowflake and we will do it 100% within the established rules. If this makes you angry, I suggest you go speak to your son's head coach and ask him why he's teaching your son to be a victim.
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Online gumby_in_co

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #21 on: March 15, 2018, 12:54:20 PM »
I had a mom yell at me, "You made them like this!"

How dare you turn her baby into a man!
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Offline Michael

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #22 on: March 15, 2018, 12:54:46 PM »
Yeaaaa ... i had to explain this to a lot of parents after i was qouted...

My pc version... "we hit people to knock them down"

Probably why im retiring from youth... but i digress

Yeah, when I tell people I coach O-Line, I always point out that I teach little kids to knock other little kids down.
“If you can't explain it to a six-year-old, you don't understand it yourself.” ― Albert Einstein

Online gumby_in_co

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #23 on: March 15, 2018, 12:55:45 PM »
Were we ever wrong?  Absolutely!  Of course, the majority of the kids wouldn't cleanly fall into a given set of positions. 


At least it gave us something to do during "shorts week".  :D
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Offline patriotsfatboy1

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #24 on: March 15, 2018, 12:59:05 PM »
I had two kids get in a fight after the supposedly-really-good one got pancaked on an O-Line drill by a supposedly-not-very-good one.  I was the only one who had them ranked the right way, by the way.  Anyway, we had a meeting of the coaches and the parents of the two kids two days or so later (not my idea).  I had a mom yell at me, "You made them like this!"

I should probably put that on my football resume if I ever make one.

Did you proudly smile when she said it or did you wait until after she left.  :D

Offline blockandtackle

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #25 on: March 15, 2018, 02:28:35 PM »
Interesting. I teach them that "we hit to hurt" and "we're looking to hurt people".

And I see the point.  I actually would like to do that, but when you work in public schools you learn pretty quickly that there are overcautious administrators and parents everywhere who think a school lawsuit is like getting a winning lottery ticket, you have to be careful.

Offline CoachDP

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #26 on: March 15, 2018, 04:35:09 PM »
I have found that I can teach many kids how to be aggressive, but there are some that I can't get to (and maybe that is just my fault).

Eric, that's the case with any fundamental.  Some kids pick up things right away, some are slower at picking it up.  For some, the ability to learn the fundamentals quickly determines whether they are a starter, or not. 

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Offline GP

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #27 on: March 15, 2018, 04:48:05 PM »

Probably why im retiring from youth... but i digress

what's next?
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Offline CoachDP

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #28 on: March 15, 2018, 04:49:55 PM »
There will be some kids that are out there because dad is forcing them to be, they are timid and have no desire to change it.  I may never get that kid to be aggressive. 

--Kids are there for all kinds of different reasons, and the reasons really don't matter.  Few youth teams show up with 25 kids who are all about being football players.  It doesn't really matter if Dad is forcing them to play, or because their next door neighbor played last year, or their parents want them to make new friends.  Their reason for being there is not important.  If it were, we'd just divide up players between those who "played last year," "those whose dad is forcing them," "those whose brother also played," "those who are there because they heard it was fun," "those who are there because their mom wanted a adult male figure in their lives"...and so on.  My point is, none of those reasons really matter, unless they matter to you.  If it matters to you, then yes, it probably affects the dynamic in a big way.

I might also have someone that has no problem being aggressive, but they don't care about their team so they just go out there hitting random people and getting penalties.  Part of teaching aggression is having kids know that there are some boundaries.  If they are dropping kids 2 seconds after the whistle, then we have a problem.  If they are hitting in a restricted area (for example, head-hunting), then we have a problem.  Both of those are because the player is being selfish and not thinking of the team.  On the other hand, if everyone is aggressive and working for each other, then it becomes viral and it is much easier for those on the bubble to "get it".

--These are teaching issues, not player issues.  Selfishness, not playing for the team, head-hunting are all things that a coach can resolve.

--Dave

« Last Edit: July 21, 2018, 10:33:33 AM by CoachDP »
"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

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Offline CoachDP

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #29 on: March 15, 2018, 04:54:09 PM »
Last Spring a scrimmage opponent had a RB that was blazingly fast and scored a couple of TDs. On one, he turned around and ran backward the last 10 yards, taunting our team with the ball. He drew a penalty, but so did we. One of our players trucked him 5 yards behind the end zone. My initial and emotional reaction was to be pleased that we sent a message. That was wrong of me.

I dunno, Lar.  Mebbe.  Mebbe not.  It seems to me that the taunter learned "Cause and Effect," which is an especially difficult lesson for children to learn.

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"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement:
"I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go." #BattleReady newhope