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Author Topic: Coaching aggression  (Read 7678 times)

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Offline CoachDP

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #30 on: March 15, 2018, 05:12:23 PM »
The reason why we "look for things" in kids as opposed to coaching things in kids is time. Dp, you make a great point but on a youth level your limited by the county as to the allowable time you have with your team each week. In my area it's 6 hrs. Your also potentially limited by a small coaching staff or having more dad's who are helping vs real coaches. "Finding" a kid who has a talent to play QB, C, or WR before the coaching begins speeds up the process significantly as the investment becomes more affordable. So I guess we may agree to disagree on that one.

Time is always an issue.  For everyone.  You think I never had "dad coaches?"  I coached youth football for 15 years.  We were given 6 hours a week.  And when I was coaching youth football, that's where we showed what the dynamic of Aggression could be, and how it negatively impacts your opponent.  It was in those 6 hours a week that I learned the benefit of its implementation, as well as how to teach it.  Then, like now, I never looked for a particular trait in order to teach it.  I had too many players with too many different traits.  Instead, I focused on what we wanted from these players.  In the early years, it was about what our "expectation" was for these players, through how high we set the bar for them.  Then we disregarded "expectation" and decided that "demand" was more important for what we were doing because when we demanded it, we had to expect more from our coaches through the work ethic of what we were demanding.  For us as coaches, it came down to "How hard do we (as coaches) want to work?"

As far as finding a kid who has a talent to play QB, C or WR, I know what saves time.  And I will say again, "Aggression is about effort."  Effort doesn't require talent. If you can teach "effort," then you can also teach "aggression," IF that is also your focus.  If you can't teach "effort" (and many coaches cannot), then you will not be able to teach "aggression."

--Dave
« Last Edit: July 21, 2018, 10:42:25 AM by CoachDP »
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Offline CoachDP

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #31 on: March 15, 2018, 05:23:17 PM »
The most physical teams I've ever coached had the entire team line up and do 5 minutes of quick board drills a day, every day, until the season started and then we still had them do that once a week.  We had an All-State QB with D1 offers getting in there and mixing it up with the WRs and DBs one-on-one in the same board drills as our OL and DL.  It really helped teach kids to not be contact shy and to compete in physical contests.

The dynamic and components of teaching "aggression" at the youth and high school levels are very different.  While "aggression" is a necessary and vital component of success at either level, how you get there and it's impact on the game are very different.  That being said, I agree with your approach to it at the high school level.

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Offline CoachDP

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #32 on: March 15, 2018, 05:36:52 PM »
I teach them that "we hit to hurt" and "we're looking to hurt people".

Absolutely, this ^.  (Although the reason for doing so may be different than what some coaches might think.)

One day at practice, when I was coaching 7-9s, we had a player make a textbook, perfect tackle on another of our players.  The ball-carrier was flat on his back, crying from the impact of the hit.  It was nothing more than simply getting the breath knocked out of him, but the player who'd made the tackle was mortified.  He was apologetic, frightened and worried that he was going to get in trouble for hurting a teammate.  But his tackle was perfect.  It was what we taught and he'd executed it perfectly.  I knew that if I'd been negative towards him about the result, that I could have lost him as a football player.   My concern was that he'd play tentative after seeing "what he'd done."  So I took the opportunity to tell him in front of the team that not only was his tackle perfect, but that he did exactly what he was supposed to do.  I chose to use it as a teaching moment for our team, in what we were looking for.  "Hit to hurt," so that they'd not be afraid whether they were going to hurt someone.  We were taking the bridles off of our players.

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« Last Edit: July 21, 2018, 10:43:37 AM by CoachDP »
"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement:
"I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go." #BattleReady newhope

Offline CoachDP

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #33 on: March 15, 2018, 05:51:32 PM »
As I said, I am careful about explaining the difference between hurt and injured. We NEVER want to injure anyone.

We're not trying to injure anyone, and we don't teach (or encourage) our players to take shortcuts to doing so.  We are not about dirty play.  We pick up our share of penalties for sideline hits, QB sacks and such.  As I said, we take the bridles off and we look for opportunities to make the highlight hit.  We will hit you.  But that's different from "aggression."  "Aggression" is tough, physical play from your team, regardless of whether it results in opponents getting hurt, or not.   But we acknowledge and celebrate the physical aspect of the big hit.

--Dave
"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement:
"I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go." #BattleReady newhope

Offline gumby_in_co

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #34 on: March 16, 2018, 12:41:19 AM »
I dunno, Lar.  Mebbe.  Mebbe not.  It seems to me that the taunter learned "Cause and Effect," which is an especially difficult lesson for children to learn.

--Dave

Yes, but hitting a guy 3 seconds after the whistle is against the rules and should have been corrected instead of lauded.
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Offline Michael

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #35 on: March 16, 2018, 01:21:53 AM »
Yes, but hitting a guy 3 seconds after the whistle is against the rules and should have been corrected instead of lauded.

OK, three seconds is a long time.  But to be fair, if the first whistle counted, officials wouldn't blow it five more times or so every play.
“If you can't explain it to a six-year-old, you don't understand it yourself.” ― Albert Einstein

Offline mahonz

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #36 on: March 16, 2018, 04:51:42 AM »
My thought on teaching aggression is that teaching kids to be aggressive is exhausting but well worth it.

Its all about the atmosphere you create day one and must continue all the way to the very last snap of the season. Its never something you decide to do during the season because you feel your team is soft....ever. Then its too late and you just might look desperate. Never a good thing.

Like Michael's pissed off mom explained so well...you have to make them this way.  :) ....cuz it aint happening at home thats for sure. And yes I do believe every kid has this inner switch. Just have to learn how to help him flip it when he puts on those pads. Its a process and why it has to start day one every pre season.

Lar and I have this sick Neanderthal count we do every game between the two of us. That is how we rate our aggression. Its our Mojo Count.

How many times does the game have to stop to help a player off the field. 

We usually win around 4-0 most every game. Hit to hurt. And no...the Peanut Gallery has no clue this goes on.  ;)

We have played against A LOT of very talented teams in the past that were nothing more than Marshmallows. This touches on Zachs point....Marshmallows have no real confidence. They are simply pretenders. See it quite often actually and our teams generally abuse these teams mentally.

Consider this....Football is roughly 15% physical, 80% mental and about 5% dumb luck.

Where do you want your team to fall in?

If you are looking for talent you will fall into that 15% category. Everyone needs a little luck every now and then but we cant rely on it. So whats left....

Be mental.

Make your players accountable for everything. EVERYTHING even if it seems silly.

Make your players take ownership in everything. Its their team....not yours. This must be relayed to the Parents as well. Football is never their deal....always their sons deal. The sooner they understand this the better.

Hierarchy.  Let your Alpha Dogs roam free. This will turn them from bullies into leaders and create more Alpha Dogs. You want Alpha Dogs. For example, NEVER roll thru your roster allowing the kids to take turns being the Caption for a game. That is incredibility counterproductive when it comes to creating a Hierarchy. Game day Captains has to be something earned however you deem necessary. We make it a weekly competition and if the same players keep their Captionship week after week....oh well...the others gotta step up and take it or accept it. Wee weep.

Which leads to my next point. EVERYTHING is earned and yes if you try as a coach...every player can become good at something to help his team. Some of the worst players I have coached have found  something they can get good at. Just dont put them in a position to fail initially and leave them there expecting results.  Also be willing to shuffle talent because failing is a part of football so all of your players must learn to deal with it. Next rep....next play...next game....always moving ahead. Gotta be patient to pull this off.

Pad up and hit with hate. Be VIOLENT. Nuff said. Then go right back to being gentlemen off the field. Nothing in life teaches a young man how to become a gentleman better than the game of football. Promote this...pound on this.

Everything is a competition and make it suck when you lose. Really suck especially after a game. I will never buy into this... if the kids win its on them but when the kids loose is on the coaches. That is utter BS if you are a halfway decent coach.  That said....if you screw up as the coach...tell em. You gotta take ownership as well. Two way street.

NEVER be afraid to tear a kid down privately or in front of the team. Hell...fire him for 15 minutes. Then never let that kid leave the field without building him right back up.  I simply tell the kids...the day I stop getting into your grille is the day you need to worry. At the same time be complementary when a compliment is earned.

The Football Family. The Brotherhood. Every single player is there to play for the name on the front of the jersey....never
 the one on the back of the jersey. They play for the man next to them...never themselves. Promote this every day all day and your level of Mojo will sky rocket out the roof. No selfish players equals no selfish play. No selfish play will forever translate into a successful team. The name on the backs of our jerseys is always the team mascot. We do not allow nameplates and the kids know why. No individuals allowed.

Once all of the above starts taking shape....2-3 weeks or one full preseason....your kids will play faster and with confidence and become very aggressive. Like sharks in the water looking for blood. This has ABSOLUTELY NOTHING to do with X's and O's. Has EVERYTHING to do with everything else. So dont be a fool and spend some time on the everything else. Too many coaches just want to run plays all the time in practice.

And always remember...there is nothing nice about the game of football at any level. Never play dirty and never teach dirty but never be...nice. And for the love of Pete.....make practice hard. That alone will pay off in spades.

My take.

« Last Edit: March 16, 2018, 04:58:53 AM by mahonz »
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Offline patriotsfatboy1

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #37 on: March 16, 2018, 09:27:32 AM »
--Kids are there for all kinds of different reasons, and the reasons really don't matter.  Few youth teams show up with 25 kids who are all about being football players.  It doesn't really matter if Dad is forcing them to play, or because their next door neighbor played last year, or their parents want them to make new friends.  Their reason for being there is not important.  If it were, we'd just divide up players between those who "played last year," "those whose dad is forcing them," "those whose brother also played," "those who are there because they heard it was fun," "those who are there because their mom wanted a adult male figure in their lives"...and so on.  My point is, none of those reasons really matter, unless they matter to you.  If it matter to you, then yes, it probably affects the dynamic in a big way.

Learning is a two-way street.  If someone does not want to learn or get better, then it makes it difficult to teach them.  Sometimes, you can get them to want to learn, but I have had a couple that just never wanted to be there in the first place and didn't want to learn.  Even after a couple of years, they were just going through the motions and stayed as MPP's.

--These are teaching issues, not player issues.  Selfishness, not playing for the team, head-hunting are all things that a coach can resolve.
Agreed, but sometimes you have to take the "jackass" out of a kid, which is just another layer of complexity.  Not insurmountable. 


Online Vince148

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #38 on: March 16, 2018, 11:32:47 AM »
My thought on teaching aggression is that teaching kids to be aggressive is exhausting but well worth it.

Its all about the atmosphere you create day one and must continue all the way to the very last snap of the season. Its never something you decide to do during the season because you feel your team is soft....ever. Then its too late and you just might look desperate. Never a good thing.

Like Michael's pissed off mom explained so well...you have to make them this way.  :) ....cuz it aint happening at home thats for sure. And yes I do believe every kid has this inner switch. Just have to learn how to help him flip it when he puts on those pads. Its a process and why it has to start day one every pre season.

Lar and I have this sick Neanderthal count we do every game between the two of us. That is how we rate our aggression. Its our Mojo Count.

How many times does the game have to stop to help a player off the field. 

We usually win around 4-0 most every game. Hit to hurt. And no...the Peanut Gallery has no clue this goes on.  ;)

We have played against A LOT of very talented teams in the past that were nothing more than Marshmallows. This touches on Zachs point....Marshmallows have no real confidence. They are simply pretenders. See it quite often actually and our teams generally abuse these teams mentally.

Consider this....Football is roughly 15% physical, 80% mental and about 5% dumb luck.

Where do you want your team to fall in?

If you are looking for talent you will fall into that 15% category. Everyone needs a little luck every now and then but we cant rely on it. So whats left....

Be mental.

Make your players accountable for everything. EVERYTHING even if it seems silly.

Make your players take ownership in everything. Its their team....not yours. This must be relayed to the Parents as well. Football is never their deal....always their sons deal. The sooner they understand this the better.

Hierarchy.  Let your Alpha Dogs roam free. This will turn them from bullies into leaders and create more Alpha Dogs. You want Alpha Dogs. For example, NEVER roll thru your roster allowing the kids to take turns being the Caption for a game. That is incredibility counterproductive when it comes to creating a Hierarchy. Game day Captains has to be something earned however you deem necessary. We make it a weekly competition and if the same players keep their Captionship week after week....oh well...the others gotta step up and take it or accept it. Wee weep.

Which leads to my next point. EVERYTHING is earned and yes if you try as a coach...every player can become good at something to help his team. Some of the worst players I have coached have found  something they can get good at. Just dont put them in a position to fail initially and leave them there expecting results.  Also be willing to shuffle talent because failing is a part of football so all of your players must learn to deal with it. Next rep....next play...next game....always moving ahead. Gotta be patient to pull this off.

Pad up and hit with hate. Be VIOLENT. Nuff said. Then go right back to being gentlemen off the field. Nothing in life teaches a young man how to become a gentleman better than the game of football. Promote this...pound on this.

Everything is a competition and make it suck when you lose. Really suck especially after a game. I will never buy into this... if the kids win its on them but when the kids loose is on the coaches. That is utter BS if you are a halfway decent coach.  That said....if you screw up as the coach...tell em. You gotta take ownership as well. Two way street.

NEVER be afraid to tear a kid down privately or in front of the team. Hell...fire him for 15 minutes. Then never let that kid leave the field without building him right back up.  I simply tell the kids...the day I stop getting into your grille is the day you need to worry. At the same time be complementary when a compliment is earned.

The Football Family. The Brotherhood. Every single player is there to play for the name on the front of the jersey....never
 the one on the back of the jersey. They play for the man next to them...never themselves. Promote this every day all day and your level of Mojo will sky rocket out the roof. No selfish players equals no selfish play. No selfish play will forever translate into a successful team. The name on the backs of our jerseys is always the team mascot. We do not allow nameplates and the kids know why. No individuals allowed.

Once all of the above starts taking shape....2-3 weeks or one full preseason....your kids will play faster and with confidence and become very aggressive. Like sharks in the water looking for blood. This has ABSOLUTELY NOTHING to do with X's and O's. Has EVERYTHING to do with everything else. So dont be a fool and spend some time on the everything else. Too many coaches just want to run plays all the time in practice.

And always remember...there is nothing nice about the game of football at any level. Never play dirty and never teach dirty but never be...nice. And for the love of Pete.....make practice hard. That alone will pay off in spades.

My take.
Great info, M. I know that I am guilty about the captain thing. In the beginning of the season, I always pick captains on effort. After I've rolled through though, I then want to give everyone else a chance. But you're right. It should be earned regardless.

Offline gumby_in_co

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #39 on: March 16, 2018, 12:55:46 PM »
Great info, M. I know that I am guilty about the captain thing. In the beginning of the season, I always pick captains on effort. After I've rolled through though, I then want to give everyone else a chance. But you're right. It should be earned regardless.

Our header last Fall fudged this process twice and tried a 3rd time.  I never truly saw the value in weekly competition for captains until I saw that nonsense.
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Offline Coach Brad

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #40 on: March 16, 2018, 01:16:04 PM »
Last season every "senior" player on the team was a captain for a game at least once, and I feel I found a week in which each one of them earned it with effort during the practice week.

I've done just about every which way to pick captains, players vote, coaches pick, same 4 all season. What I've come to realize is it doesn't matter that much. Your leaders will be your leaders regardless. And if being a game captain once helps some of the lesser player feel more involved in the team and improves their football experience, then so be it.

Offline mahonz

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #41 on: March 16, 2018, 01:27:12 PM »
Last season every "senior" player on the team was a captain for a game at least once, and I feel I found a week in which each one of them earned it with effort during the practice week.

I've done just about every which way to pick captains, players vote, coaches pick, same 4 all season. What I've come to realize is it doesn't matter that much. Your leaders will be your leaders regardless. And if being a game captain once helps some of the lesser player feel more involved in the team and improves their football experience, then so be it.

I cant even begin to explain what happens to the team dynamics when a lessor player does indeed over take a Captain....even if its just for a week.

Here is an example of what can happen. Had a kid that was a Manimal and was a Captain for probably 3 straight years. No one could take him down in our Sumo the Death drills...a drill we use to create each Captain every Friday. At the beginning of the 8th grade season he came to me and asked if he could give his Captainship to Alex. Alex was by far the worst player on the team. I was a bit stunned and gave him the green light. He then told the team that anyone that wants to take this Captions position from Alex still had to go thru him.

It all ties in....The Football Family. Its very a very real thing.

Collect moments, not wins.

Offline patriotsfatboy1

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #42 on: March 16, 2018, 01:30:24 PM »
Our header last Fall fudged this process twice and tried a 3rd time.  I never truly saw the value in weekly competition for captains until I saw that nonsense.

I send out 4 different kids each week.  They don't do anything other than shake hands with the referees and some opponents.  It was a small thing to give everyone a chance to do that.

For us the biggest thing is that we have a "practice player of the week".  This is the player that, during the week of practice before really gave it more than everyone else.  Instead of our normal practice jersey, I purchased a couple of camouflage jerseys of different sizes.  The player of week gets to wear that all week and then we hand it out to someone new the following week at the beginning of the first practice.  Kids liked it and I was able to reward effort.

Offline Coach Brad

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #43 on: March 16, 2018, 01:54:55 PM »
I cant even begin to explain what happens to the team dynamics when a lessor player does indeed over take a Captain....even if its just for a week.

Here is an example of what can happen. Had a kid that was a Manimal and was a Captain for probably 3 straight years. No one could take him down in our Sumo the Death drills...a drill we use to create each Captain every Friday. At the beginning of the 8th grade season he came to me and asked if he could give his Captainship to Alex. Alex was by far the worst player on the team. I was a bit stunned and gave him the green light. He then told the team that anyone that wants to take this Captions position from Alex still had to go thru him.

It all ties in....The Football Family. Its very a very real thing.
That's all great. I'm glad you have been to get what you want out of it. In my experience, it doesn't matter all that much. I've always found your leaders are your leaders and will shine through no matter what, as long as you allow them to.

Offline mahonz

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #44 on: March 16, 2018, 01:57:31 PM »
I send out 4 different kids each week.  They don't do anything other than shake hands with the referees and some opponents.  It was a small thing to give everyone a chance to do that.

For us the biggest thing is that we have a "practice player of the week".  This is the player that, during the week of practice before really gave it more than everyone else.  Instead of our normal practice jersey, I purchased a couple of camouflage jerseys of different sizes.  The player of week gets to wear that all week and then we hand it out to someone new the following week at the beginning of the first practice.  Kids liked it and I was able to reward effort.

If being a Caption is only about the coin flip then I can see rotating the roster to do that. If being a Caption rolls over into the week then not so much. I like the practice player jersey thing.
Collect moments, not wins.