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Author Topic: Coaching aggression  (Read 8709 times)

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Offline mahonz

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #45 on: March 16, 2018, 01:58:48 PM »
That's all great. I'm glad you have been to get what you want out of it. In my experience, it doesn't matter all that much. I've always found your leaders are your leaders and will shine through no matter what, as long as you allow them to.

True.
Collect moments, not wins.

Offline CoachDP

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #46 on: March 16, 2018, 02:07:53 PM »
Last season every "senior" player on the team was a captain for a game at least once, and I feel I found a week in which each one of them earned it with effort during the practice week.

I donít pick our captains and we donít vote.  If youíre going to be a captain, then get out in front everybody else and lead.  Thereís no one stopping you.

óDave
"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

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Offline gumby_in_co

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #47 on: March 16, 2018, 03:59:25 PM »
I donít pick our captains and we donít vote.  If youíre going to be a captain, then get out in front everybody else and lead.  Thereís no one stopping you.

óDave

What happens when 12 players decide to be captains all at once?
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Offline ZACH

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #48 on: March 16, 2018, 04:45:04 PM »
What happens when 12 players decide to be captains all at once?

Theyll figure it out amongst themselves im sure
"Some athletes have division 1 dreams and jv work ethic" - random

Offline Dusty Ol Fart

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #49 on: March 16, 2018, 05:37:07 PM »
What happens when 12 players decide to be captains all at once?

One Word.  SUMO! 
Not MPP... ONE TASK!  Teach them!  :)

Offline mahonz

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #50 on: March 16, 2018, 05:39:43 PM »
Collect moments, not wins.

Offline patriotsfatboy1

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #51 on: March 16, 2018, 08:40:00 PM »
If being a Caption is only about the coin flip then I can see rotating the roster to do that. If being a Caption rolls over into the week then not so much. I like the practice player jersey thing.

I think I stole the practice jersey idea from someone else here. It was at least inspired by someone here.

They were surprisingly cheap online. My son, who is a freshman, thought it was stupid because I never did it with his teams. Turns out the younger kids loved it and it helped motivate the kids throughout the season. Just a little thing that helps build the culture.

Offline Michael

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #52 on: March 16, 2018, 09:56:48 PM »
I think I stole the practice jersey idea from someone else here. It was at least inspired by someone here.

They were surprisingly cheap online. My son, who is a freshman, thought it was stupid because I never did it with his teams. Turns out the younger kids loved it and it helped motivate the kids throughout the season. Just a little thing that helps build the culture.

We gave it to kids for practice base on game performance.  Black mesh.  The kids went nuts for it.  One for an O-Lineman, one for a D-Lineman, and one for a LB/DB.  The ball guys were not eligible, although they could win it on D.  Handed them out in the meeting right after the game ended.
ďIf you can't explain it to a six-year-old, you don't understand it yourself.Ē ― Albert Einstein

Offline CoachDP

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #53 on: March 16, 2018, 11:35:29 PM »
What happens when 12 players decide to be captains all at once?

They all seemed to figure it out.  If you want to get up front, then do so.  For us, there were 4 guys that it was more important to than the others and when they were up front, no one challenged them. 

--Dave

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Offline CoachDP

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #54 on: March 17, 2018, 08:53:43 AM »
We usually win around 4-0 most every game. Hit to hurt. And no...the Peanut Gallery has no clue this goes on.  ;)

If, by the "Peanut Gallery," you mean "Parents" then ours did have a clue this goes on.  We told them this was our approach.  We were up front and transparent about it.  We teach this way for a reason.  We don't make ask or expect our players to be complicit in any sort of secretive approach.  I don't believe in "What goes on in the locker room, stays in the locker room."  That approach will get you fired.  I believe in being able to coach the game as if every parent were standing on our practice field.

--Dave
"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement:
"I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go." #BattleReady newhope

Offline CoachDP

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #55 on: March 17, 2018, 10:07:54 AM »
This is from my PowerPoint on Aggression.  While I'll post an excerpt here, it's not for distribution as a PDF or PP.

The P.A.I.N! Program: Physicality, Aggression, Intensity Now!
The Concept of Aggression Development: Philosophy and Approach

I don't know how to teach a player to "Hit someone as hard as you can; Just make sure that you don't hurt him."  I don't know how to coach a player by telling them, "Just give me your best, and whatever that is, it will be enough," because there is no way to quantify what his "best" is.  You'll never win a teaching point if you are "asking for a player's best" or asking for "100%" (whatever that is) because there's no way to quantify it.  If he's not giving you the result you want, but he tells you he is "doing my best," then where do you go from there?  If his "best" wasn't acceptable, yet you've already said, "Just give me your best," then you will confuse the player and are going back on your word if you decide that his best isn't good enough and make the decision to replace him.  If you don't replace him, then you may be stuck with a player on the field who is masquerading by telling you "That's my best," but it really isn't.  There's no way to really quantify what his best is, which is why we never ask for it.  We simply demand that our players "do their job."  If they do their job, then we don't have to worry about what their best is, or being able to quantify it.  On the other hand, we can easily quantify whether they did their job.  "Did you make that tackle?"  Yes, or no?  "Did you allow that receiver to get behind you?" Yes, or no?  It's never about asking for, or being satisfied with a player's "best."

I have witnessed practices where the coach tells the player, "You've got to give me 100% on this play."  The player nods in acknowledgment and then misses the tackle.  The coach yells at him for missing the tackle and the player says, "I'm trying as hard as I can."  Who's right?  Did the player give his best?  If he did, then shame on the coach for yelling at him for missing the tackle.  He made the mistake of telling the player, "Give me your best," instead of saying, "Your job is to make the tackle.  Make the tackle."  The former can't be quantified.  The latter can.  We coach with what can be quantified.

So the question becomes, "Did you do you job?"  As coaches, how can we quantify whether the player did it, or not?  By measuring what percentage of effort the player gave?  By whether the player gave their "best?"  By how hard the player "tried?"  Or, by the result?  We measure our player's performance not by something as ambiguous as effort, but by the result.  We teach with the result in mind.

That's why I don't concern myself with telling players to "give me 100%."  I don't care about 100%, or what 100% looks like.  You certainly can't measure it.  It is entirely subjective so there's no point in arguing whether someone is giving their "best."

What you can quantify is whether someone is doing their job, or not.  When it comes to tackling, we quantify the success of their job by two things: Whether their ball-carrier got back up and whether we got the football.  If he got back up, then you didn't hit him hard enough.  You didn't do your job.  If we didn't get the football, then you didn't hit hit him hard enough.  You didn't do your job.  Conversely, if he didn't get back up and/or we got the football, then you did your job.  It's simple.

Effort is not a skill, and anyone can give it.  There isn't a particular quality that we look for in demanding effort from our players.  Great effort can come in any shape, size and age.  Don't make the mistake of thinking you can eyeball a player as to who will have it, or not have it, when it is an entirely teachable component.  Effort is a fundamental.  It is taught like any other fundamental.  And like every fundamental, a coach needs to have expertise in teaching the fundamental, if he expects his players to be sound in that fundamental.  Skill (or talent), on the other hand, is what allows coaches to feature a certain trait.  But we don't rely on our kids already having those traits. 

Can you recognize which players will give effort and which ones won't?  I don't look for it because I know that we will teach it.  Why look for players who are adept at running Wedge, if they haven't run my Wedge?  They will still have to be trained in how I want it done, regardless of whether they've done it before.  If we see that a player already has skilled hands, does that make him a good candidate to be a receiver?  It might, but since "effort" is not a skill, there's nothing to look for.  Especially as it pertains to Aggression Development.  Does everyone develop at the same rate as far as our approach is concerned?  No, but since we are completely uniform in our approach, this results in our all being on the same page.  In other words, the gap between our most aggressive player and our least aggressive player isn't great, because of what we teach and the approach we use in teaching it.  We don't have one player that we are afraid to put on the field.  Many coaches can't say the same of their team.

Coaches complain that some players don't want to give effort.  I'll contend that all kids don't want to give the effort that we demand.  There are two reasons for this:  1) They're kids.  2)  It's hard.  Very hard.  Certainly harder than anything they've ever tried to do before.  De La Salle's high school football program is known for many things, such as their effort in coming off the ball at the line of scrimmage.  These are high school kids; not robots or automatons.  They give great effort and giving great effort is hard to do.  And yet their players do it.  Do they have a unique kind of player?  Or do they have a unique kind of coach?

--Dave



« Last Edit: July 21, 2018, 10:55:46 AM by CoachDP »
"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement:
"I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go." #BattleReady newhope

Offline angalton

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #56 on: March 17, 2018, 10:46:04 AM »
If, by the "Peanut Gallery," you mean "Parents" then ours did have a clue this goes on.  We told them this was our approach.  We were up front and transparent about it. 

--Dave

This is #1 with everything.
The greatest accomplishment is not in never failing, but in rising again after you fail.

Offline vikingdw

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #57 on: March 17, 2018, 03:01:49 PM »
Coach Potter,

Absolutely love your last post!
Curious...What do you tell your Olinemen that their job is on each play? ("Do your job!")
Thanks!
-Bobby

Offline CoachDP

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #58 on: March 17, 2018, 03:46:40 PM »
What do you tell your Olinemen that their job is on each play?

To be engaged with a defender at the whistle.

--Dave
« Last Edit: March 17, 2018, 03:58:21 PM by CoachDP »
"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement:
"I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go." #BattleReady newhope

Offline CoachDP

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #59 on: March 17, 2018, 04:05:41 PM »
What tactics do you use to draw out aggression from your players? What drills do you run specifically to make your players more aggressive?

Whatever you choose to do, it needs to be a process that your entire team experiences and participates in.  Nothing kills the team-building aspect of Aggression Development like having some players participate in it and others miss it.  In addition, there's no way the ones who are absent can develop Aggression when they aren't there to learn how.  I've seen too many coaches be sporadic about their team's Aggression Development Plan, and then wonder why they don't have it, or why their team hasn't bought in.

--Dave
« Last Edit: March 19, 2018, 12:29:42 PM by CoachDP »
"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement:
"I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go." #BattleReady newhope