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Author Topic: Coaching aggression  (Read 7677 times)

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Offline Dimson

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #90 on: December 10, 2018, 02:34:54 PM »
In group (whether Iím coaching high school or youth) players in each group donít vary enough from player to player to worry about matchups.  In what scenario would you have a 70 lb. player matched up against a 180 lb. player?

óDave
Team tackling drills if you don't have enough coaches to have 2 tackling drills.

Offline CoachDP

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #91 on: December 10, 2018, 03:26:00 PM »
Team tackling drills if you don't have enough coaches to have 2 tackling drills.

So a 180 lb. Offensive Tackle will be in team tackling drills against a 70 lb. Cornerback?

óDave
"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

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Offline Wing-n-It

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #92 on: December 10, 2018, 03:46:47 PM »
The worst disparity in weight was we had a 75 pound kid and our weight limit was 160 at the time.
I had no kids that were 150 or higher that carried the ball but we had to face a team that had a kid that barely made weight and they ran him like a rented thoroughbred. Our league only had minimum weight and maximum weight rules but anyone could run the ball.
I had to teach the little bugger Clarks wrap and trip method of tackling and it worked. He was a tough kid.
Robert

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Offline Dusty Ol Fart

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #93 on: December 10, 2018, 04:33:02 PM »
Assuming Youth Level, Team Drill, Yes they ALL participate in the drills.   However, to Dave's point, I do not allow them to go against each other in those Drills.   I've seen far too many Oooh and Ahhhh drills where Coaches are looking for the Huge Collision.  15 yard head start etc. 

Aggression is, in large portion, a result of Confidence.  In our case, Confidence comes from a personal belief that I can do the job.  That belief alone makes all the difference in the world!  We dont instill confidence using Brute Force or Fear.  In fact, doing so, will have the opposite effect.  Building Confidence is a "Controlled Experiment" that requires patience on our part.   One Tackle or Drill does not "Release The Beast" as it were. Yet, done right, it can lead to same. 

jmho   
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Offline CHARLIEDONTSURF

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #94 on: December 10, 2018, 10:13:26 PM »
I'm late to this thread but couldn't agree more.  Aggression, confidence, competition -- they're all fruit of the same tree.  I emphasize them constantly --in sports and as a father-- and I agree with others: It's not what you do, it's how you do it.  I can probably build more aggression in one game of wall-ball than some coaches can get in an entire season of tackling circuits.

I always joke that I love nothing more than coaching a team of ďyounger brothers.Ē  You give me a bunch of kids who grew up being last dog at the bowl and Iíll give you one helluva good football team! 

It doesnít matter whoís standing across from him -- in a younger brother's mind, everything is a competition with his older sibling(s).  A chance to go home and gloat and piss in his brother's Cheerios.  He may or may not be a focused kid, but he almost certainly hustles and has a powerful need to prove himself.  He's also used to having things he doesnít like done to him.  Itís hard to distract a younger brother once he learns to accept discipline.  Because heís not merely in it to win; he wants to dominate.

I think about all that and then I think about what made him that way.  And it reminds me of a quote from Full Metal Jacket: "Private Joker is silly and ignorant but he's got guts, and guts is enough."

I introduced all my sons to grappling and jiujitsu at an early age for similar reason.  Someone once described BJJ as a process of being drowned, then taught to swim, every 5 minutes.  That's a good (and instructive) analogy, I think.  You're made utterly helpless, then taught what you did wrong and how to escape it (and how to do it to someone else).  It's very empowering, and right as you're confidence is spilling all over the place... DUNK!  Right back under water you go.  And the process repeats.  Used correctly, it's a stair-stepped approach that can build a frightening amount of self-confidence.

So a 180 lb. Offensive Tackle will be in team tackling drills against a 70 lb. Cornerback?

Speaking of 180 vs. 70... funny story.  When all my sons were little we competed in silly "tests of manhood." (Still do.)  Stupid stuff, but it always involved competing to overcome fear.  Like picking up a live cicada, catching a scorpion, cannonballing into cold water, etc.  The one my sons laugh about to this day is the "Taco."  All my sons have a taco story.  When they turned 5 or 6, I'd lay my full weight on on top of them and go limp and say "Ok, I'm not moving until you make me."  The point was to teach them self-reliance and show them they can control what happens to them, even if it involves a bigger, stronger adult.

Every one was the same.  At first they laugh and struggle, and after about 2 minutes they squirm and get frustrated.  Maybe they punch.  Inevitably, they pout and go completely limp at some point, determined to just wait me out.  Time passes.  They stare at the ceiling.  I don't move or talk.  And neither do they, except the occasional attempt to suddenly jerk free, like a spasm.  This continues for a looooooong time (different with each kid) but, at some point, the mexican standoff ends and panic or rage takes over and they fight.  I mean really fight.  Scratching, gouging, biting, hair-pulling, you name it.  That's the stuff I'm waiting for, and --to a man-- they all manage to get free.  Always.

My oldest had the first, and best, method: He got one leg free and brought his knee directly up into my nuts.  I saw stars, slithered off, and patted him and said "See. I told you you could do it."  He gloated for weeks (and years) about the time he kicked his old man's ass.

Back to football... it's possible to turn a drooling glue-eater into a total badass willing to cut you down at the knees.  I've seen it happen.  Sounds like others have to.

Sorry for all the diarrhea.  I just love this topic.

Offline CoachDP

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #95 on: December 11, 2018, 11:30:34 AM »
Assuming Youth Level, Team Drill, Yes they ALL participate in the drills.   However, to Dave's point, I do not allow them to go against each other in those Drills.   I've seen far too many Oooh and Ahhhh drills where Coaches are looking for the Huge Collision.  15 yard head start etc.

I saw that stupid junk this year.  Kids weren't hitting, so coaches moved them further away from each other.  Really?!  On what planet does increasing the distance improve the quality of the tackling?  It's the stupidest thing I think I've seen in football coaching and I've seen a lot.

--Dave
"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement:
"I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go." #BattleReady newhope

Offline CoachDP

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #96 on: December 11, 2018, 11:33:00 AM »
Assuming Youth Level, Team Drill, Yes they ALL participate in the drills.

Then that is what KOTS is for.

--Dave
"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement:
"I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go." #BattleReady newhope

Offline Dimson

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #97 on: December 11, 2018, 11:44:45 AM »
So a 180 lb. Offensive Tackle will be in team tackling drills against a 70 lb. Cornerback?

óDave
We tried to match them up based on size and/or aggression level.

Offline CoachDP

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #98 on: December 11, 2018, 12:08:23 PM »
Aggression is, in large portion, a result of Confidence.  In our case, Confidence comes from a personal belief that I can do the job.  That belief alone makes all the difference in the world!  We dont instill confidence using Brute Force or Fear.  In fact, doing so, will have the opposite effect.  Building Confidence is a "Controlled Experiment" that requires patience on our part.   One Tackle or Drill does not "Release The Beast" as it were.

Scott, spoken like a true Aggression-Whisperer.  I still get phone calls/texts/emails about the DRILLS.  "Dave, send me the DRILLS!" As if the drills were the plug-and-play magic bullet elixir that any coach can use.  I got news for ya.  It ain't the drill, but how you teach.  If you can't teach, then this won't work.  We all have certain strengths as coaches, and we all have Achilles heels.  For whatever reason, something we've always done well is taught the physicality/aggression/intensity component of football to youth, middle and high school teams.  In my early years, we taught it well without being acutely aware of cause & effect, or the mathematics and application of it.  In other words, when I was asked "how" we were getting the results of what we were getting, I didn't have a quick and ready response because it wasn't something I'd thought about.  In my mind, I was just coaching football.  So after getting so many questions about our approach, I began to put the nuts and bolts of it together: what we did/how we did/why we did.  Which gave me an even greater appreciation of how little it was about the "drill," and how much of it was our understanding of teaching.  Sharing our approach with other coaches demonstrated some success with their programs, as well.  I don't believe anyone adapted our P.A.I.N! Program as well as Ken Friend, whose teams were so physical it dwarfed even what we were doing with our teams.  On the other end, it has become a nightmare of sorts when coaches think they are teaching our philosophy but couldn't be any further off the mark.  We get (what I hesitate to call) "coaches" who use a TYFA-approach and believe that toughening up your players has to do with foul language, insulting tactics and other negative applications.  I am not that kind of coach and never have been.  The discussion has always been something of a prickly point, as some coaches swear that it's only about the talent you have, whether the kids are from the "inner city," or whether you are a demon for even claiming to teach Mojo.  Mike Mahoney and myself have both been subject of the slings and arrows that come our way from teaching a "hit to hurt" approach.   At the same time safety has always been paramount to us, and I have to laugh when I see all the hoopla over Seahawks/Rugby/Rocky Seto/Pete Carroll tackling when we have not only been teaching shoulder tackling forever, but also KOTS tackling which I also see as being touted as some sort of Seattle Seahawks-development. 

--Dave
« Last Edit: December 11, 2018, 02:39:18 PM by CoachDP »
"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement:
"I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go." #BattleReady newhope

Offline CoachDP

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #99 on: December 11, 2018, 12:14:51 PM »
And it reminds me of a quote from Full Metal Jacket: "Private Joker is silly and ignorant but he's got guts, and guts is enough."

And one of mine:  "It doesn't take size, speed, strength or talent to be able to hustle and to show a willingness to work hard. And I can teach them how to work hard."

--Dave
"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement:
"I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go." #BattleReady newhope

Offline Wing-n-It

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #100 on: December 11, 2018, 12:24:03 PM »
"Dave, send me the DRILLS!" As if the drills were the plug-and-play magic bullet elixir that any coach can use. 
--Dave

Yeah but can you still send me the drills though?


I need to know the drills so I can make my team aggressive.  ;)
Robert

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Offline CoachDP

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #101 on: December 11, 2018, 12:31:20 PM »
When all my sons were little we competed in silly "tests of manhood." (Still do.)  Stupid stuff, but it always involved competing to overcome fear.  Like picking up a live cicada, catching a scorpion, cannonballing into cold water, etc.  The one my sons laugh about to this day is the "Taco."  All my sons have a taco story.  When they turned 5 or 6, I'd lay my full weight on on top of them and go limp and say "Ok, I'm not moving until you make me."  The point was to teach them self-reliance and show them they can control what happens to them, even if it involves a bigger, stronger adult.

Every one was the same.  At first they laugh and struggle, and after about 2 minutes they squirm and get frustrated.  Maybe they punch.  Inevitably, they pout and go completely limp at some point, determined to just wait me out.  Time passes.  They stare at the ceiling.  I don't move or talk.  And neither do they, except the occasional attempt to suddenly jerk free, like a spasm.  This continues for a looooooong time (different with each kid) but, at some point, the mexican standoff ends and panic or rage takes over and they fight.  I mean really fight.  Scratching, gouging, biting, hair-pulling, you name it.  That's the stuff I'm waiting for, and --to a man-- they all manage to get free.  Always.

--Great story.  And learning lesson.  Not just for kids but for coaches.  It's great to hear when a coach says "I can turn a wallflower into a rabid werewolf."  But then the question becomes, "But how did you do it, so that I can do it too?"  You obviously have a process.  You KNOW what you're trying to achieve and you also KNOW what steps to take to get you there.

Back to football... it's possible to turn a drooling glue-eater into a total badass willing to cut you down at the knees.  I've seen it happen.

--As have I, which is why I don't worry about how many "studs" I have, or what the aggression-level is that they bring to the table; we will coach this into them.  And make no mistake, it is something that is coached.  And I have had any number of kids who came to me as Dr. Jeckyll, became Mr. Hyde while they played for us, and then returned to Dr. Jeckyll when they moved on because their coach didn't teach it.  He made the mistake of relying on the player to bring it to the table.  We don't make that mistake:  If you're already Mr. Hyde, then we will teach you to become even more so; and if you are a timid wallflower, we will teach you how to at least hold your own on the field, if not be a cocky sonofagun who enjoys laying the wood.

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement:
"I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go." #BattleReady newhope

Offline CoachDP

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #102 on: December 11, 2018, 12:32:38 PM »
Yeah but can you still send me the drills though?


I need to know the drills so I can make my team aggressive.  ;)

Smart aleck. lol

--Dave
"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement:
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Offline CHARLIEDONTSURF

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #103 on: December 11, 2018, 01:03:01 PM »
I still get phone calls/texts/emails about the DRILLS.  "Dave, send me the DRILLS!" As if the drills were the plug-and-play magic bullet elixir that any coach can use.

Next time someone asks for drills send him your meet and greet drill.  If he protests or scratches his head, he was doomed to fail anyway.   :)
« Last Edit: December 11, 2018, 01:21:18 PM by CHARLIEDONTSURF »

Offline Dusty Ol Fart

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Re: Coaching aggression
« Reply #104 on: December 11, 2018, 01:50:41 PM »
I prefer a more modern association as most kids have no clue who Jekyll and Hyde are. 

Banner and Hulk.  2 Words   "Hulk Smash"

 ;)
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