Author Topic: Communication  (Read 231 times)

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Offline CoachDP

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Communication
« on: August 09, 2018, 05:14:15 PM »
One aspect of coaching that is critical (and where I see so many coaches fail) is in communication.  Just because we know how to communicate doesn't mean we are good at it.  Coaches, surprisingly, seem especially bad in this department.   Our league jamboree is approaching and I was wanting to find an alternative to the non-challenging, waste of time format that I remembered it being (although it's been more than a decade since I last had a team that participated in one).  So I emailed the commissioner of a rival org and I asked her if her org's PeeWee team was interested in scrimmaging us, as an alternative to the jamboree.   She responded saying it was "fine by me" and that she had forwarded my message to her coach.  I followed up with an email to her coach, letting him know that the scrimmage format as well as the location was his choice.  His response?  Nothing, nada, crickets. 

A header in a different rival org sent me an email ONE day before official practice began, telling me he was going to install the Double Wing and asked me for help with his install.  I replied that the time constraints this close to the first day of practice made that request next to impossible and that I was also now coaching for a rival org.  His response?  Nothing, nada, crickets.  So I don't even have a confirmation that he received my email.

When I get coaches asking me for PowerPoints, video, etc., occasionally I get a coach that takes the time to introduce himself, tells me the age group he's coaching and perhaps the amount of experience he has.   Sometimes he'll even talk about how they're struggling and what they'd like help in.  But the majority of coaches emailing me for first time just tell me to send them a PowerPoint on whatever, as if that were my job.

I don't get it.  But I see it now, more than ever.

--Dave

« Last Edit: August 09, 2018, 05:31:07 PM by CoachDP »
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Offline spidermac

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Re: Communication
« Reply #1 on: August 10, 2018, 09:03:51 AM »
Dave,

Could not agree more...at the end of the day, Coaching is teaching, and teaching is communicating...My assistant coaches tease me about some of the emails I sent out, because they are detailed, very detailed in what I want to communicate, but I know at least some of them appreciate the verbosity (10 dollar word) as there is no mistaking what my intent is. I send out my practice plans, which are generally one to three lines, they indicate what the segment applies to (Offense, Defense, Special Teams, Conditioning, Aggression, etc.), what the drill or activity is (small group, team, Circle of Death, Whose Ball) and then a couple of lines of short explanation (Bigs - Board Work, Backs Meshes, Receivers - Stalk Blocking). Then in the email, I go over each segment with more detail if required... I might say the bigs board work is going to focus on the first two step, or starting already fitted, or the ball guys will be working on Counter Meshes from Blue and Ace.

I suspect that coaches that have trouble communicating their ideas in written form, possibly struggle on the field as well...

Chris
None of them suck, they just haven't found what the kid is good at yet.

Offline davecisar

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Re: Communication
« Reply #2 on: August 10, 2018, 09:11:05 AM »
One aspect of coaching that is critical (and where I see so many coaches fail) is in communication.  Just because we know how to communicate doesn't mean we are good at it.  Coaches, surprisingly, seem especially bad in this department.   Our league jamboree is approaching and I was wanting to find an alternative to the non-challenging, waste of time format that I remembered it being (although it's been more than a decade since I last had a team that participated in one).  So I emailed the commissioner of a rival org and I asked her if her org's PeeWee team was interested in scrimmaging us, as an alternative to the jamboree.   She responded saying it was "fine by me" and that she had forwarded my message to her coach.  I followed up with an email to her coach, letting him know that the scrimmage format as well as the location was his choice.  His response?  Nothing, nada, crickets. 

A header in a different rival org sent me an email ONE day before official practice began, telling me he was going to install the Double Wing and asked me for help with his install.  I replied that the time constraints this close to the first day of practice made that request next to impossible and that I was also now coaching for a rival org.  His response?  Nothing, nada, crickets.  So I don't even have a confirmation that he received my email.

When I get coaches asking me for PowerPoints, video, etc., occasionally I get a coach that takes the time to introduce himself, tells me the age group he's coaching and perhaps the amount of experience he has.   Sometimes he'll even talk about how they're struggling and what they'd like help in.  But the majority of coaches emailing me for first time just tell me to send them a PowerPoint on whatever, as if that were my job.

I don't get it.  But I see it now, more than ever.

--Dave

Dave

I totally get it

Back in 2003-2004 I had a "binder" which had our playbook , drills and philosophy. Was written for my coaches and not done very well- no pics etc

We also filmed one of our own in house for my program coaches clinics

I easily spent over $2000 copying those then VHS tapes and mailing them all out for free, to coaches who had asked me for it

Every once in awhile I would email some of the guys who asked me for it- probably 75% hadnt "had the time" to get to it- and I rarely emailed until several months had passed  ::) ::)
However beautiful the strategy, you should occasionally look at the results.

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