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Author Topic: Video game quitter syndrome  (Read 1228 times)

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Offline CoachCottrill

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Video game quitter syndrome
« on: October 16, 2018, 09:22:09 AM »
I'm going to posit a theory here that I'm working on. I've been coaching youth football for 34 years. I used to spend much time in these forums and learned a lot from them but I'm not on here often now.

I am coaching a very inexperienced and very unathletic (no speed) team this year. During a few of our early season blowouts this year, I noticed my players just quitting. I mean absolutely no effort at all. I have seen this happen in years past when my team is beating an opponent badly. Once the kids quit, there is no getting them back. The score gets way out of hand because the losing team isn't even trying to stop the scoring. I was scouting an upcoming opponent, whose best player was out that game, do the same thing. They will not fight to the end of the game when they see there is no chance of winning it.

Now my theory. Since these kids have played video games their whole life, a lot of their life experiences are tied up in that. That's their paradigm. What do they do when they're losing in a video game and can see no way of coming back? They QUIT the game and hit the reset button and start over. This is programming their minds to quit when they face tough odds. So... on game day...when they face tough odds.... they have no life experience that teaches them that they SHOULD fight to the end. They find no reason within themselves to do so. The problem with quitting then is that the game goes on and the score piles up until it's over.

I have explained my theory to the kids and they believe I'm right. Now we're trying desperately to remedy the situation. I have preached all year to fight for 40 minutes no matter the the score. Mainly because I didn't really think we could win one single ball game so I wanted to give them an achievable goal. They've been buying in and we played hard for 40 minutes in a game we lost for the first time. BTW, we have won 3 games and we did play hard for 40 minutes in them as well. I am bragging on them for effort for the whole game whether we won or lost. Honestly the 41-20 loss felt as good as the other wins because I felt like we crossed a hurdle that day. I hope we don't revert back.

I have used a few lessons and analogies along the way to illustrate the problem. They're helping out and the kids are buying in. At least they're having fun as we do this. It's amazing how I learn new stuff every year no matter how long I do this.

Let me know what you think of my theory and your possible remedies.

Coach Dave (the other one, not the famous DP)

Offline Wing-n-It

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Re: Video game quitter syndrome
« Reply #1 on: October 16, 2018, 09:34:00 AM »
So, do we teach them to play until the game is over?

DO we teach them to play the video game and once you start a game, be it video or real game, you play till the game is over and give full effort?

Sorry I'm just thinking out loud, but you bring a good point. I mean I play video games, violent ones and I am not a violent person. But I also don't quit games either. It aint over till its over.

So maybe this can be a moment where you challenge them when they are at home and fire up the video game and play madden or whatever, to not quit and play hard till the end. No quitting!!

Shoot I could see myself in a "game of the week challenge" with a player where we play madden till the end.

Its a different era definitely. you just got my brain going on how to possibly integrate the 2
Robert

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Offline ZACH

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Re: Video game quitter syndrome
« Reply #2 on: October 16, 2018, 09:40:43 AM »
Kids quit because they learned it from someone, likely their parents, sibling or some one they look up to.

Video games and home consoles have been around since the 70s. Now in 3rd generation consoles the "reset" button is a problem?

Fornite the game that every kid is playing is a 1v99 game. That means everyman for themselves. If anything this game is teaching kids to be able to be succesful alone and learn from their own mistakes and improve individually.

Just my take
"Some athletes have division 1 dreams and jv work ethic" - random

Offline CoachDP

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Re: Video game quitter syndrome
« Reply #3 on: October 16, 2018, 09:40:45 AM »
Coach Dave (the other one, not the famous DP)

I thought you were the famous one.  ;D

--Dave
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Offline Dusty Ol Fart

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Re: Video game quitter syndrome
« Reply #4 on: October 16, 2018, 09:55:36 AM »
Your analogy is pretty accurate.  "Famous Dave" and I recently sent a few messages back and forth regarding what happens and reactions to when you get "Punched In The Mouth" (figuratively and literally).

After every game we talk about "Character Development" either directly or indirectly.  We talk about the fact that there IS NO RESET BUTTON on this game or in life. 
Not MPP... ONE TASK!  Teach them!  :)

Offline SingleWingGoombah

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Re: Video game quitter syndrome
« Reply #5 on: October 16, 2018, 11:41:08 AM »
I do not think this theory is correct.  I think it is just a lack of being able to relate to between generations, that is causing some errors in translation here. 

Kids are incredibly resourceful when they want to be.  My kids play fortnite.  They are absolutely terrible at fortnite.  They find videos, and watch people who are good at fortnite to try and learn from them and get better.  I tie that type of resolve to sports. 


The older you get, the harder you have to work to be able to relate to the new generations.  That's not a new concept. You are just getting further removed from the generations you coach. 

Offline Wing-n-It

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Re: Video game quitter syndrome
« Reply #6 on: October 16, 2018, 11:46:08 AM »
I do not think this theory is correct.  I think it is just a lack of being able to relate to between generations, that is causing some errors in translation here. 

Kids are incredibly resourceful when they want to be.  My kids play fortnite.  They are absolutely terrible at fortnite.  They find videos, and watch people who are good at fortnite to try and learn from them and get better.  I tie that type of resolve to sports. 


The older you get, the harder you have to work to be able to relate to the new generations.  That's not a new concept. You are just getting further removed from the generations you coach.
There is so much proof in what you say

I teach STE(Science Technology Engineering and Math) at a trade college and we go through generational training to help us "understand" the younger generations.

I'm actually a gen X'r but was raised as a baby boomer due to my father being born in 1928 and having me late in life. Go Dad

I have a decent itme understanding the younger crowd but I will have to keep up to train the younger kids
Robert

2 Things my offense will always have is a Wing and a Wedge

Offline SingleWingGoombah

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Re: Video game quitter syndrome
« Reply #7 on: October 16, 2018, 11:55:20 AM »
There is so much proof in what you say

I teach STE(Science Technology Engineering and Math) at a trade college and we go through generational training to help us "understand" the younger generations.

I'm actually a gen X'r but was raised as a baby boomer due to my father being born in 1928 and having me late in life. Go Dad

I have a decent itme understanding the younger crowd but I will have to keep up to train the younger kids

Having boys age 7 and 9, I am easily able to keep up.  But as they age out... it will become more difficult.  It wont just be paying attention to what is going on at home. 

OP has been coaching for 34 years... he would have to be far removed from that "home" field advantage that I have right now.

Offline angalton

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Re: Video game quitter syndrome
« Reply #8 on: October 16, 2018, 11:56:35 AM »
Video games are probably not the problem. What you did was find a way to relate to them on another level. When I was young, kids would quit all the time. I am taking my ball home type stuff. Most likely it is more about what they get away with from there home life. Parents fight a defend them in school or other public settings like that. When I was younger I would get my ass beat if school ever called my house. Respect your elders or suffer the consequences.
The greatest accomplishment is not in never failing, but in rising again after you fail.

Offline coachmiket

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Re: Video game quitter syndrome
« Reply #9 on: October 16, 2018, 12:46:53 PM »
Everyone seems thinks that their own generation was the best without even trying to understand other generations and how they approach life (advantages, disadvantages, technology available etc).


Offline CoachDP

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Re: Video game quitter syndrome
« Reply #10 on: October 16, 2018, 12:49:52 PM »
Everyone seems thinks that their own generation was the best

Well I know that mine was.

--Dave
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Offline coachmiket

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Re: Video game quitter syndrome
« Reply #11 on: October 16, 2018, 12:57:33 PM »
Well I know that mine was.

--Dave

Nuh uh!  Mine was.

Offline CoachDP

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Re: Video game quitter syndrome
« Reply #12 on: October 16, 2018, 01:01:28 PM »
Nuh uh!  Mine was.

We had Rock'em Sock'em Robots.  Game, set and match.

--Dave
"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement:
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Offline Mean Machine

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Re: Video game quitter syndrome
« Reply #13 on: October 16, 2018, 01:05:13 PM »
We had Rock'em Sock'em Robots.  Game, set and match.

--Dave

Is still do!
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Offline Mean Machine

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Re: Video game quitter syndrome
« Reply #14 on: October 16, 2018, 01:12:41 PM »
In addition to your theory, I think youth athletics is too structured.  There are too many adults involved and too many rules.  I don't want to sound like the "get off my lawn guy", but when I was a kid, we played pick-up games in the neighborhood.  We had arguments over calls, in-bounds or out-of-bounds, safe or out.  If we couldn't convince each other, we called "do over".  If games got out of hand, we switched up the teams but kept playing.  But the focus was on playing the game.  Now it is all about winning and championship trophies.  Then again, maybe I'm just a grumpy old man!
"Deeds not words."  - Ralph DeSantis