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Author Topic: Video game quitter syndrome  (Read 1075 times)

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Offline CoachDP

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Re: Video game quitter syndrome
« Reply #15 on: October 16, 2018, 01:37:40 PM »
when I was a kid, we played pick-up games in the neighborhood.  We had arguments over calls, in-bounds or out-of-bounds, safe or out.  If we couldn't convince each other, we called "do over".  If games got out of hand, we switched up the teams but kept playing.  But the focus was on playing the game.

This ^.  No adults allowed.

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Online angalton

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Re: Video game quitter syndrome
« Reply #16 on: October 16, 2018, 01:42:11 PM »
We had Jarts, what a game, what a toy. Big metal tipped darts and didn't lose one eye.
The greatest accomplishment is not in never failing, but in rising again after you fail.

Offline Coach E

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Re: Video game quitter syndrome
« Reply #17 on: October 16, 2018, 01:50:31 PM »
In addition to your theory, I think youth athletics is too structured.  There are too many adults involved and too many rules.

Interesting. My dad used to espouse this as well. He believed that organized sports should start at the junior high level - 7th grade.

Recently I was watching our varsity high school team and was sitting with my former head coach. This guy is a local legend having won 4 state titles and earning multiple trips to the playoffs during his tenure. He suggested that football around our parts - and other sports as well - are starting way too young and the kids reach a burnout point. This is in combination with a lack of decent coaches making the experience anything but fun for the vast majority of the kids playing and the increase of specialization.
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Offline SingleWingGoombah

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Re: Video game quitter syndrome
« Reply #18 on: October 16, 2018, 01:54:04 PM »
Everyone seems thinks that their own generation was the best without even trying to understand other generations and how they approach life (advantages, disadvantages, technology available etc).

I have said this so many times... I get so sick of hearing people bitch about kids these days...  These kids I get to interact with all the time at practice, games, etc... They are awesome kids.  Just cause you cannot relate to the new generation does not make them inferior. 


Offline coachmiket

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Re: Video game quitter syndrome
« Reply #19 on: October 16, 2018, 02:16:04 PM »
In addition to your theory, I think youth athletics is too structured.  There are too many adults involved and too many rules.  I don't want to sound like the "get off my lawn guy", but when I was a kid, we played pick-up games in the neighborhood.  We had arguments over calls, in-bounds or out-of-bounds, safe or out.  If we couldn't convince each other, we called "do over".  If games got out of hand, we switched up the teams but kept playing.  But the focus was on playing the game.  Now it is all about winning and championship trophies.  Then again, maybe I'm just a grumpy old man!

That focus on winning and trophies is usually adult driven as well.

I think kids are still playing games and competing against each other, it just happens to be in an electronic universe these days.

Offline Dusty Ol Fart

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Re: Video game quitter syndrome
« Reply #20 on: October 16, 2018, 02:44:15 PM »
I have said this so many times... I get so sick of hearing people bitch about kids these days...  These kids I get to interact with all the time at practice, games, etc... They are awesome kids.  Just cause you cannot relate to the new generation does not make them inferior.

Indeed, I see them on the baseball diamonds, on the Basketball courts, or outdoors in general. Not!  That being said, that certainly doesn't make them "Bad Kids".  Societal change in the "importance" of things.  I'm convinced that the lower numbers we are seeing across all sports is due, in part, to Parents who were not involved in Sports as a child themselves. Sports are not as important to a person or parents who never followed or played them. 
 
It also has to do with the overemphasis on specialization so we see a huge rise 12 month sports like Basketball, Soccer, Baseball. I have heard interview after interview about the strain being put on kids bodies because they have No Time Off.  Tommy John Surgery at 15 and 16 years of age.  Knee surgeries (Scopes) are like dollar specials. I also believe the other poster is right as well.   There is also something to be said about "Burn Out" and what the right age is to start playing. 

Add all the social factors outside our control and maybe we do indeed need to rethink how to connect.   As they say "It's a different breed of cat" we're dealing with.           
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Offline coachmiket

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Re: Video game quitter syndrome
« Reply #21 on: October 16, 2018, 02:54:10 PM »
Indeed, I see them on the baseball diamonds, on the Basketball courts, or outdoors in general. Not!  That being said, that certainly doesn't make them "Bad Kids".  Societal change in the "importance" of things.  I'm convinced that the lower numbers we are seeing across all sports is due, in part, to Parents who were not involved in Sports as a child themselves. Sports are not as important to a person or parents who never followed or played them. 
 
It also has to do with the overemphasis on specialization so we see a huge rise 12 month sports like Basketball, Soccer, Baseball. I have heard interview after interview about the strain being put on kids bodies because they have No Time Off.  Tommy John Surgery at 15 and 16 years of age.  Knee surgeries (Scopes) are like dollar specials. I also believe the other poster is right as well.   There is also something to be said about "Burn Out" and what the right age is to start playing. 

Add all the social factors outside our control and maybe we do indeed need to rethink how to connect.   As they say "It's a different breed of cat" we're dealing with.         

I also look at all of the other productive options available to kids now as a potential factor in the lower sports participation numbers.  I'm just saying this based on my own personal experience in my neck of the woods.  We live in a pretty solid school district.  There are so many clubs within the school now that offer after school activities and that seem to line up with pointing the students towards potential trades and careers.  For instance, the high school pretty much has it's own tv channel.  There are classes for media production.  Accelerated students get to work on camera and off camera as part of a team that now livestreams a ton of varsity games in all sports.  We've got drone coverage at our football games on Friday nights for the livestream as well as a student or two who serve on the broadcast team, sometimes with a guy who also does part time sports talk on the weekends on one of the local sports talk stations. The middle school (and maybe below) has a STEM program for engineering and robotics stuff.  They have invention conventions in the school and compete across the state in robotics and invention competitions. 

These are just to name a couple examples.  So while you're not seeing kids out at a playground going at it competitively, they are possibly somewhere else enriching their minds and spirits through different types of competition.  And they are finding out more about their own likes and dislikes and potential career paths.  Which is pretty valuable.  I've seen too many "jocks" put too many of their eggs into the athletics basket while in high school, only to be out of sports after a college season or two (if they were lucky) and then struggle to find their next walk of life.

Just my take.

Offline gumby_in_co

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Re: Video game quitter syndrome
« Reply #22 on: October 16, 2018, 03:01:12 PM »
I agree that quitting when the going gets tough is a natural tendency. Mahonz and I watched it for most of this season. The last few games, we finished strong. Partly because these young, first year players are becoming conditioned to the grind of the game. Partly because we have been stressing it.

I don't know about the video games being a cause. First of all, most of our players don't play video games yet, if you ask them or their parents. Second, is it possible that they hit the reset button because it's in their nature? In other words, I agree with the correlation, but I'm not 100% sold on the direction of the cause/effect.
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Offline Seabass

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Re: Video game quitter syndrome
« Reply #23 on: October 16, 2018, 03:30:06 PM »
If everybody was born mentally "tough" then being mentally tough wouldn't be celebrated or even recognized. The path of least resistance is the natural way for all living creatures.

Offline SingleWingGoombah

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Re: Video game quitter syndrome
« Reply #24 on: October 16, 2018, 03:30:24 PM »
Indeed, I see them on the baseball diamonds, on the Basketball courts, or outdoors in general. Not!         

Just because its different than you generation, does not make it wrong for theirs.

Offline Dusty Ol Fart

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Re: Video game quitter syndrome
« Reply #25 on: October 16, 2018, 04:08:39 PM »
Just because its different than you generation, does not make it wrong for theirs.

Read the Whole Thing!     
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Offline CoachDP

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Re: Video game quitter syndrome
« Reply #26 on: October 17, 2018, 01:12:12 PM »
I don't think the issue is "Why kids quit."  I think the issue is "Insuring that kids don't quit."  One way is to make sure you don't fall too far behind in a game.  Of course, that's fairly simple and obvious.  What's not so simple is how to avoid having that happen.  When I was a header in Pop Warner during our 2000-2010 run, in 90 of the 93 games that we won, we trailed in several of those.  We were not always the most talented team or the best-coached team.  But we still managed to win.  More importantly, we didn't quit.  For us, I have always found that the answer (for us) was in how we practiced.  It's hard to get on our team and stay on our team.  We make practice difficult in a myriad of ways and whether our players are still having to do a field-length section of burpees as our warm-up, or the players are literally fighting for their jobs, they are motivated.  In addition, so is the staff.  And as coaches lead, players follow.

I've told the story often, but when I was the header at GHHS, we trailed in 7 of the 9 games we played, yet finished 8-1.  We didn't go belly-up when we trailed 13-0 in the 1st Quarter in the season-opener and we didn't quit when we trailed 20-7 at halftime to another.  Most memorably, we came back to win 27-23 in our season-finale after trailing 23-14 in the 4th Quarter.  Yet, those kids have been raised on video games. 

I've just seen too make times where quitting simply isn't the reason for our loss, or where we could have quit when we trailed, but didn't.  I don't see a correlation between video games/reset buttons and a lack of effort or quitting.  If I believed video games were the issue, I'd say so. 

I think that kids who confirm and agree that video games are the reason they quit are simply passing the buck, instead of taking responsibility.  And kids will almost always avoid taking responsibility, especially when they are given the opportunity.

Coach:  "Are you a quitter, or is it the video game-mentality that teaches youth quit?!"

Player: "It's the video game's fault!"

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Offline CoachCottrill

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Re: Video game quitter syndrome
« Reply #27 on: October 17, 2018, 01:41:26 PM »
I agree that kids will take the easy way out. What I'm trying to figure out is am I reprogramming them to not quit or am I programming them to not quit for the first time. Most of these kids have not played football till this year. They don't have a memory bank full of experiences to draw on like grown men do. They have not experienced the thrill of fighting to the end in a worthwhile cause.

Practice builds mental and physical toughness but it takes time and experience to build the confidence to fight on into them. It has been a while since I've had a team as inexperienced as this group. At least we haven't developed loseritis. They still come to practice, have fun and work hard.

To address the unstructured physical activity time thing. I always have a 15 minute fun drill built into practice. Last year I decided that my new fun drill for the year was backyard football. We take our helmets and shoulder pads off and play pickup tackle football. All us coaches do is blow the whistle and stand at the edges of the playing field. The kids decide the rest of the rules as they play. They absolutely love it and beg to play it. My thought process on this is that they'll learn to tackle without using their head and it will help make them a little rougher for having played it. I've doubled down on it this year and added "Smear the Queer" as another fun drill. Again a screaming success with the boys. I see rough play and conditioning as they're chasing each other as the benefit. It is even less structured than backyard football is. Official name for that game is "Dogpile" if I'm ever asked about it.

Remember this is just a theory I have and like all of them is a work in progress.

Coach Dave

Offline CoachDP

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Re: Video game quitter syndrome
« Reply #28 on: October 17, 2018, 01:52:48 PM »
Remember this is just a theory I have and like all of them is a work in progress.

Oh I get that, Dave.  And you may very well be right.  It could be video games.  I'm just saying that since we don't have a problem with "giving up," once we fall behind, and all of our kids play video games, I'm not seeing video games as a problem.  However, even if I agreed that video games were the problem, that doesn't resolve the issue and that's what we need to work on: Since video games cause kids to hit reset/do-over/quit, how do we, as coaches, overcome this?  Finding the answer is much more the productive than trying to identify the problem.

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Offline CoachCottrill

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Re: Video game quitter syndrome
« Reply #29 on: October 17, 2018, 02:21:02 PM »
I am absolutely all about finding the solution DP. That's why I'm posing it here. I just would like to identify the cause and it may help me find the solution. Maybe the solution is "keep doing what I do" with these kids and it may just be that it takes a little longer to sink in since they have no experience. Like I said in the original post, I think we may have turned the corner 2 weeks ago. Only time will tell. We play a winnable final game of the season. If we win, we'll be in the playoffs but we'll face an undefeated team that beat us 62-0 in the opening game. We absolutely quit fighting in that game.

Coach Dave