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Offense => General Offense Discussion => Zone Blocking => Topic started by: Pearls of Wisdom on February 11, 2013, 11:05:02 PM

Title: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on February 11, 2013, 11:05:02 PM
Stopped by for a brief visit.  There has been a lot of discussion on "ALEX GIBBS" Zone Blocking.  There are MANY ways to teach zone blocking, but his way is the only way WE ran it.  I'm not saying it is the best way, nor the only way, but I have never seen anyone teach it better than Alex!

I am prepared to discuss HIS methods, and answer any questions anyone might have.  To START with - here are HIS basics for anyone that might be interested:

NOTE:  O-LINE SPLITS = 18” (CONSISTENT).  OLM OFF THE BALL (HANDS ON CENTER'S SHOELACES):


INSIDE ZONE TECHNIQUE (DRIVE BLOCK TECHNIQUES):

A.   COVERED:  Take a 6” lead step aiming eyes at playside number.  Second step to crotch (do not crossover).  Hands at base of shoulder pads.

1.   If DLM stretches with you – stay on block and uncovered teammate works up on LBer.

2.   If DLM anchors on you – double team with uncovered teammate.  Stay on block until wiped off & then work upfield  aiming eyes to playside number of LBer.

3.   If DLM slants inside – force him to flatten his slant and double team with uncovered teammate.  Stay on block until wiped off & then work upfield aiming eyes to playside number of LBer.

B.   UNCOVERED:  Take a 6” lead step aiming eyes at helmet of DLM.  Do not cross over on second step.

1.   If helmet goes out on your 1st step  – 2nd step upfield aiming eyes to playside number of LBer.

2.   If helmet stays put – double team (hip to hip) with covered teammate & wipe him off on Lber.

3.   If helmet slants inside - get eyes to his playside number.  Double team with covered teammate & wipe him off on LBer.



OUTSIDE ZONE TECHNIQUE (REACH BLOCK TECHNIQUES):

A.    COVERED:  Take a 6” lead step aiming eyes at playside arm pit.  Second step slightly outside crotch (do not crossover).  Inside hand on midline & outside hand under armpit.

1.   If DLM stretches with you – stay on block and uncovered teammate works up on LBer.

2.   If DLM anchors on you – stay on block with eyes on playside arm pit. 
 
3.   If DLM slants inside – force him to flatten his slant by stiff arming him inside.  Stay on block until you feel uncovered teammate & then come off aiming eyes to playside number of LBer.

B.   UNCOVERED:  Take a 6” lead step aiming eyes at helmet of DLM.  You may crossover on second step.

1.   If helmet goes out & you haven’t contacted DLM by 3rd. step – work upfield  aiming eyes to playside armpit of LBer.

2.   If helmet stays put – shove him over to covered teammate and work upfield aiming eyes to playside armpit of LBer.

3.   If helmet slants inside – aim eyes to his playside armpit.  Take him over & wipe covered teammate off to LBer.






ZONE RULES:

TEACH “COVERED/UNCOVERED” (TO DETERMINES WHO ZONE BLOCKS
           AND WHO MAN BLOCKS).

A.   IF YOU ARE UNCOVERED (BY A DLM) – ZONE WITH YOUR PLAYSIDE TEAMMATE.

B.   IF YOU ARE COVERED (BY A DLM) – ZONE WITH YOUR BACKSIDE TEAMMATE (UNLESS HE IS COVERED THEN YOU MUST MAN BLOCK).

NOTE:  IF YOUR MAN IS STACKED IN A “TANDEM” – ZONE WITH TEAMMATE WHOSE MAN IS ALSO STACKED.

*******************************************************************************************

QB/RB TECHNIQUES ON INSIDE & OUTSIDE ZONE:



I.   INSIDE ZONE:

A)   QB:  OPEN TO TITE 5 O’CLOCK (RIGHT) OR 7 O’CLOCK (LEFT).  USE 2ND STEP FOR DEPTH.  EXTEND BALL – MESH POINT ON 3RD STEP.  THE 4TH STEP BEGINS NAKED MECHANICS.  GOOD FAKE OF NAKED AWAY – DRIVE FOR 5 STEPS.  NO PEEK BACK – FINISH!


B)   RB (TOES @ 7 1/2 YARDS):  FOOTWORK:  OPEN STEP, CROSS OVER, LAND MARK OUTSIDE LEG OF GUARD.   PRESS THE HOLE.  SHOULDERS PARALLEL TO L.O.S.  READ:  1ST DLM FROM INSIDE-OUT  PLAYSIDE (EXCLUDING A SHADED NOSE).  VS. BUBBLE OVER G – READ MAN ON T -  IF HE GIVES A READ TO CUT INSIDE – READ THE NOSE.
COACHING POINT:  MAKE YOUR DECISION NO LATER THAN YOUR 3rd STEP (TO CRAM B GAP OR MAKE A CUT) - MAKE ONE CUT & LIVE WITH IT!
CP:  ON THE INSIDE ZONE – THE BEST CUT IS “NO CUT”!!!





II.   OUTSIDE ZONE:

A)   QB:  OPEN TO 4 O’CLOCK (RIGHT) OR 8 O’CLOCK (LEFT)  FOR EXTRA WIDTH.  USE 2ND STEP FOR ADDITIONAL WIDTH.  EXTEND BALL – MESH POINT ON 3rd STEP.  THE 4TH STEP BEGINS NAKED MECHANICS.  GOOD FAKE OF NAKED AWAY – DRIVE FOR 5 STEPS.  NO PEEK BACK – FINISH.

             
B)   RB (DEPTH:  TOES @ 7 ½ YARDS).  FOOTWORK:  HITCH
KICK TO BUTT OF TE.  READ DE (OR FIRST DLM FROM OUTSIDE-IN PLAYSIDE) – IF DE GIVES YOU A READ TO CUT UP – READ THE NEXT DLM INSIDE (DT).   IF DE GIVES YOU A READ TO GO OUT – TAKE IT.
COACHING POINT:  MAKE YOUR DECISION NO LATER THAN YOUR 3RD STEP (TO CUT UP OR GO OUTSIDE)  - MAKE ONE CUT & LIVE WITH IT!

CP:  Cuts on the third step are made on the right foot going right, & the left foot going left.



Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Michael on February 11, 2013, 11:07:11 PM
Stopped by for a brief visit.

THANK YOU!
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Test Account on February 11, 2013, 11:09:54 PM
Bill, Tell coach kelly tebowthud misses him and his frankness. :)
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on February 11, 2013, 11:18:36 PM
OK!  Isn't Rich still on this site?

More thoughts (in response to a lot of discussions I read on here):

A)  As far as "Declaring "MIKE" LBer (Alex Gibbs method):
1.  In a 3 LB scheme - the Mike LB is always the "middle" of the 3 LBers.
2.  In a 4 LB scheme - the Mike LB is always the second LB in from the strong side of the formation.

B)  See the following.  It is IMPORTANT because anyone "manning" on an OUTSIDE zone play (according to Alex), the playside blockers have to use the "CATCH-HAND" if he doesn't have help coming from a teammate to his inside.  This MEANS to use your back hand to as a hook to punch or catch the defender (catch the defender just enough to funnel him down the LOS and prevent quick inside penetration).   If I am on the RIGHT side = that "punch" LOOKS like a BOXER'S "left-hook" in the ribs!!!  If anyone wants to contact me - I can go into more detail on THIS point!  I don't remember how to ATTACH a document on here.  billmountjoy@yahoo.com

BIG MISCONCEPTION ABOUT ZONE BLOCKING:

One of the BIGGEST misconception about ZONE plays is that the entire O-Line zone blocks. You only ZONE from the "BUBBLE" to the next man out towards the callside. APPLY the "Uncovered/'covered" rule: If you are uncovered - zone with teammate towards call. If you are covered - zone with teammate away from the call. If you are BOTH covered - MAN block!

EXAMPLES:

1. NO BUBBLE - NOBODY ZONE BLOCKS. All 7 "MAN" with a "DRIVE" block (on IZ), or a "REACH" block (on OZ):

---------------------------------V-V-V-V-V-V-V
---------------------------------E-T-G-C-G-T-E



2. ONE BUBBLE - YOU HAVE ONE ZONE COMBINATION (EXAMPLE: ZONE PLAY RT.) - Only the uncovered man (Center) & his play side teammate (RG) ZONE. The other 5 all "MAN" block.

----------------------------------------B
---------------------------------V-V-V---V-V-V
---------------------------------E-T-G-C-G-T-E



3. TWO BUBBLES - YOU HAVE TWO ZONE COMBINATIONS (EXAMPLE: ZONE PLAY RT.) - the uncovered LG ZONES with the Center, & the uncovered RG zones with the RT. The other 3 all "MAN" block.


---------------------------------------B----B
---------------------------------V-V----V----V-V
---------------------------------E-T-G-C-G-T-E


4. THREE BUBBLES - YOU HAVE THREE ZONE COMBINATIONS (EXAMPLE: ZONE PLAY RT.) - the uncovered LT zones with the LG, the Center zones with the RG, & the RT zones with the RE. The 1  remaining OLM "MAN" blocks.


------------------------------------B----B----B
---------------------------------V----V----V---V
---------------------------------E-T-G-C-G-T-E


REMEMBER: Zone blocking BEGINS at the "bubble" & zones TOWARDS the play side (RIGHT in all examples above). "NUMBER OF BUBBLES" = NUMBER OF DOUBLES!!!

 






Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: G-TigerHC on February 11, 2013, 11:22:06 PM
Welcome back Coach.
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on February 11, 2013, 11:31:55 PM
Thank you!  This is perhaps a brief visit.  Just wanted to clarify Alex's methods, since many seem to be groping for them.
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Test Account on February 11, 2013, 11:33:30 PM
Thank you!  This is perhaps a brief visit.  Just wanted to clarify Alex's methods, since many seem to be groping for them.
They want simple simple and easy....Alex is for the guys with all the talent.. ;D
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on February 11, 2013, 11:41:32 PM
We never had any problems teaching it in HS in over 30 years (with AND without great talent).  Our Youth feeder teams could teach it too, IF you only taught IZ & OZ blocking.

PS: I cannot help, and WILL NOT DEBATE, what someone else can or cannot teach!  This is best for US!

PPS:  Some of the GREAT HS teams that adopted OUR (Alex Gibbs) zone blocking.  Each of these teams rushed for OVER 3,000 in 12-13 game seasons!!!

1.  Holy Spirit HS (Absecon, NJ).  3 State Championships from 2007 thru 2011.  NOTE:  They now have a different staff there as of 2012 (& run option football).

2. Powhatan HS - Powhatan, Va.  Next to Phoebus HS - Powhatan won MORE games from 2000 to 2010 than ANY high school team in the state in Va.  Had a 65 game district winning streak broken this year.  INCREDIBLE feat!!!

3.  North Stafford HS (Va.).  Lost to state champs in OVERTIME in playoffs.  SEE THIS LINK:
From Coach Joe Mangano:  Here is our OZ Run Game presentation. A lot of influence from Bill Mountjoy, Alex Gibbs and Joe Gibbs.
Have our count system we used this fall with diagrams. Have clips of it against ODD/Even/Under/Bear... Wide and endzone shots.  OZ was our best play of the year. Ran over 90 times...

http://www.hudl.com/presview/114724

Read more: http://prostylefootball.proboards.com/index.cgi?board=film&action=display&thread=1489#ixzz2Kenx5juw

Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Michael on February 11, 2013, 11:46:57 PM
We never had any problems teaching it in HS in over 30 years.  Our Youth feeder teams could teach it too, IF you only taught IZ & OZ blocking.

So how do you put it in (both techniques and scheme)?

What's the progression?
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Test Account on February 11, 2013, 11:47:43 PM
We never had any problems teaching it in HS in over 30 years.  Our Youth feeder teams could teach it too, IF you only taught IZ & OZ blocking.

PS: I cannot hep, and WILL NOT DEBATE, what someone else can or cannot teach!
you are the man bill!
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on February 11, 2013, 11:52:07 PM
Look at Hudl video in my LAST post.

TEACHING PROGRESSION (simple & logical):

DRILLING ZONE BLOCKING:


1. INDIVIDUAL: (bags OR live)  “1 vs. 1”


A) INSIDE ZONE

----1. Drive Block DLM

----2. Drive Block LBer

B) OUTSIDE ZONE

----1. Reach Block DLM

----2. Reach Block LBer

************************************************************************


2. SMAll GROUP: (INSIDE & OUTSIDE ZONE TECHNIQUES - vs. bags OR live)


A) "2 vs. 2" (uncovered man & covered man work vs. a ILer & DLM).

-----1. DLM widens & LBer steps inside of DLM

-----2. DML pinches inside & LBer scrapes outside

-----3. DLM anchors on covered man & LBer moves behind DLM (reading the RB)

************************************************************************


3. LARGE GROUP: (LIVE)


A) "7 ON 5" (Live - NO bags)


------------M
-----E--T-----T--E
-----O-O-C-O-O
-----------Q

-----------R

4-3 = Gives the Center a chance to zone with Guards (on zone TO callside)




----------B-----B
------E-----N-----E
------O-O-C-O-O
------------Q

------------R

3-4 Gives the Guards a chance to zone with Tackles (on zone TO callside) or Center (on zone AWAY callside)


B) "9 on 7" (Live - no bags)


-----------W----M-----S
--------E-----T-----T-----E
--------O-O-O-C-O-O-O
-----------------Q

-----------------R

4-3 = Gives the Tackles a chance to zone with the TE's (on zone TO callside), or the Guards (on zone AWAY callside)


NOTE: The "7 on 5" & "9 on 7" should be your best ("O") vs. best ("D"). Full speed with no tackling the RB. Benefits of these:

1. COMPETITIVE DRILLS VS. DEFENSE;
2. BLOCKING TECHNIQUES VS. BLOCK REACTIONS;
3. TEACHES TOUGHNESS!!!!!


************************************************************************


4.  TEAM (11 vs. 11)


NOTE:  I am NOT trying to "sell" ANYONE on these ideas.  If I were - I'd put a price tag on it! 
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: COACH JC on February 12, 2013, 12:20:04 AM
Bill,

I've read through many of your threads.  I came after you left.  However, i enjoy the info you have, and hope this is more than a breif stay.

Thanks, Jake
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Dusty Ol Fart on February 12, 2013, 08:14:35 AM
Thanks for stopping in Bill.  Please continue to do so.   

 ;)
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on February 12, 2013, 09:35:03 AM
Thanks, guys!

Here is an OUTLINE Alex Gibbs uses at Clinics:

OUTSIDE ZONE

KEYS TO SUCCESS

1.  Stretch on the DE - The Back's key.

2.  No penetration up front - OL/TE feet must go forward (never back).

3.  "Cut" the Defense backside.  Eliminate backside pursuit (get them on the ground).

4.  QB - Make the backside respect our Keeps/Nakeds with your fake.

5.  1 Cut running by the back.  Press your course.
      a.  Aiming Point - Butt of the TE - Midline.
      b.  Primary read - DE
      c.  Secondary read - DT (based on the reaction of the DE).
      d.  Speed control by the RB. 

6.  WR - your blocks will turn an ordinary play into a BIG one.

SUGGESTION:  There has been OVER 5,000 posts on Dum Coach on ZONE BLOCKING.  Study Alex Gibbs film (by FAR the best way to learn it).  Put yourself in the RB's shoes & read HIS reads (end zone cuts).  That is the MOST IMPORTANT (& least understood) PART OF THE PLAY!!!

I have enjoyed visiting with you guys again.  If anyone needs to get more DEPTH on all this - feel free to phone me at:  804-740-4479 (between 11 AM & 6 PM/EASTERN).   Easier to explain via phone!!!
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: ZACH on February 12, 2013, 09:44:06 AM
Aww here we go! Welcome back bill! Rich is busy i guess i gotta text him to get in touch...are you guys doing the clinic during the summer again? He brought mccree down last time
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on February 12, 2013, 09:48:39 AM
Health permitting - I may do the clinic again.  I had a mini-stroke last July, & the damned pills they have me on keep me feeling dizzy!  I'll be 75 in 3 weeks.  If we do - I'll let you know!
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: ZACH on February 12, 2013, 09:51:58 AM
Thanks Bill!

Do you not like to use counting anymore?

How do you teach who's covered vs un covered?

Great having you back! Just dont post free sw playbooks hahaha
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: CoachMattC on February 12, 2013, 10:04:37 AM
Excellent stuff, thank you Coach.

Just so you know your previous efforts were appreciated I have used a good deal of the material you provided from forcing fumbles to correcting QB mechanics with my boys and had great results. Thank you again and I hope your health holds up.
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: G-TigerHC on February 12, 2013, 10:11:49 AM
Coach please dont take this the wrong way but we have a saying in South Louisiana "you cant kill bad grass" you'll outlive us all.

I get told this randomly by a retired MSGT that i know, hes just as mean and salty now as he was 30 yrs ago. Says he'll outlive me. Funny thing is, apart of me actually believes it.
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on February 12, 2013, 10:12:06 AM
Zach, Matt, & G-Tiger = thanks for the sentiments!

Yes, we use numbers.  See Joe Mangano's POWERPOINT for the numbers - he got them from me.
http://www.hudl.com/presview/114724

We just use numbers to determine WHERE our BASE "man" IS (for Zone AND Man blocks).  ULTRA-SIMPLE:
Uncovered = no DLM on you.  Covered = DLM on you.

Here is the way we give it to players.  ALABAMA teaches the zone plays THIS way.  STILL USE ALEX GIBBS' BLOCKING TECHNIQUES.

This is we what give to players:

PROGRESSION FOR TEACHING INSIDE/OUTSIDE ZONES

1.   TEACH BASE MAN BLOCKING # ASSIGNMENTS

A.  CENTER BLOCKS #0
B.  GUARDS BLOCK #1
C.  TACKLES BLOCK #2
D.  H & Y BLOCK #3
E.  #4 ACCOUNTED FOR SEVERAL WAYS.
F.  NOTE: IF “0” IS NOT IN THE “CENTER BOX” – CENTER DESIGNATES      “0” AS THE FIRST DEFENDER TO THE SIDE HE IS BLOCKING.
G.  IN A STACK – THE DLM GETS THE LOW #.


 2.  TEACH “COVERED/UNCOVERED” (TO DETERMINES WHO ZONE BLOCKS AND WHO MAN BLOCKS).

A.  IF YOU ARE UNCOVERED – ZONE WITH YOUR PLAYSIDE TEAMMATE.
B.  IF YOU ARE COVERED – ZONE WITH YOUR BACKSIDE TEAMMATE (UNLESS HE IS COVERED THEN YOU MUST MAN BLOCK).
NOTE:  IF YOUR MAN IS STACKED IN A “TANDEM” – ZONE WITH TEAMMATE WHOSE MAN IS ALSO STACKED.





Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Texan on February 12, 2013, 10:17:36 AM
Great Stuff!
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: CoachMattC on February 12, 2013, 10:19:07 AM
INSIDE ZONE TECHNIQUE (DRIVE BLOCK TECHNIQUES):

A.   COVERED:  Take a 6” lead step aiming eyes at playside number.  Second step to crotch (do not crossover).  Hands at base of shoulder pads.

3.   If DLM slants inside – force him to flatten his slant and double team with uncovered teammate.  Stay on block until wiped off & then work upfield aiming eyes to playside number of LBer.

Can you explain forcing him to flatten his slant more? Is this a case of "catching" with the backside hand? I'm imagining a 2 tech slanting inside.
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: ZACH on February 12, 2013, 10:19:45 AM
What is considered on you?

Ive heard my nose to his nosr

My inside arm to his inside arm

Whats your take
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on February 12, 2013, 10:23:01 AM
ZACH:  BASICALLY he is "on" you anywhere from shoulder to shoulder.  If you can't run straight ahead with contacting him in his original alignment - you KNOW he is "ON" you!!!
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on February 12, 2013, 10:26:43 AM
MATT:  Your question was:  Can you explain forcing him to flatten his slant more? Is this a case of "catching" with the backside hand? I'm imagining a 2 tech slanting inside.

ANSWER: = force him (shove him down) to the inside teammate rather than to allow him to penetrate the inside gap between you.  You SHOVE him in THIS situation (he is slanting inside AND your help is coming from inside).  You "catch" him only if NO help coming from inside!
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: ZACH on February 12, 2013, 10:35:23 AM
ZACH:  BASICALLY he is "on" you anywhere from shoulder to shoulder.  If you can't run straight ahead with contacting him in his original alignment - you KNOW he is "ON" you!!!

A 3 tech B gap player square in the gap guard is covered? 

Gibbs talked about near/far

If the center thinks the 1 tech is closer to the guard (playside) he will call combo with psg

If the center thinks the 1 is closer to him he will make a man call

Does this help the covered/uncovered process? 
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Dusty Ol Fart on February 12, 2013, 10:45:13 AM
INSIDE ZONE TECHNIQUE (DRIVE BLOCK TECHNIQUES):
A.   COVERED:  Take a 6” lead step aiming eyes at playside number.  Second step to crotch (do not crossover).  Hands at base of shoulder pads.


Critical Note !!
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on February 12, 2013, 10:58:12 AM
ZACH:  With 18" splits - anyone in a gap is USUALLY on a part of SOMEONE (DLM in OUR league are wider than 18").
We don't zone a shade nose playside (we CAN give Center help - with a "ricochet" as Gibbs call it - if NEED BE).  C & G zone a man closer to (or on) ON G.  3 tech will usually be ON a part of the ON G, ETC. 
 
We don't "split hairs" on all this.  Prior preparation is the KEY!  We scout the hell out of opponents, & spend countless HOURS of film work (love end zone shots).  We then draw up the game plan & rep the hell out of it.  By Friday - there will be NO DOUBT in the minds of the players WHO to block.

ALL fronts in football can be categorized into FIVE categories (PHONE me if you want a more detailed explanation).
The five categories are:  "Okie", "Even", "Over", "Under", "Solid".  Our players know how (who) to block on those 5 fronts, and that covers ALL the fronts in football. 

For one EXAMPLE:  An "OKIE" means the Center is covered & both Guards are uncovered.  That could mean a 5-2, a 3-4, a 3-3 Stack, 3-5 Stack, etc.  THEY ARE ALL BLOCKED THE SAME!

I cannot type ALL the situations - phone me at home or email me & WE CAN GET INTO DIAGRAMS.
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on February 12, 2013, 11:04:50 AM
Coach Shad - this is along same line as what you mentioned (PAGE 1 OF OUR LINE PLAY):

BLOCKING FUNDAMENTALS


STANCE:

Explosive and balanced to enable the blocker to move in four (4) directions with vertical leverage.  Eyes are up (strain thru the eyebrows).


LANDMARK:

Point of aim, target.  Area on defender to place the hands and direct the feet.


LEVERAGE:

A.   Vertical:  Pad under pad (PUP)
B.   Horizontal:  Lateral


FOOTWORK:  (Step at landmark with vertical leverage).

A.   First step = directional; playside – 6” step – step at the landmark.  Adjust your first step to the horizontal alignment of the defender (I.E. width and depth).
B.   Second step = quickness to get this step down to create power and suddenness.


HAND PLACEMENT:

Thumbs up with the elbows in tight to your framework.


FINISH!!!!!
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Jburk on February 12, 2013, 04:39:43 PM
Thanks for all of this, Bill; this is good stuff, really is. I'm loving your explanations and how you seem to simplify this.

One question though; if you had to teach this to a team of 10/11 year olds, what would be your teaching methodology? Would there be any difference from how you would teach/correct high school players? I've taught players at that age what covered/uncovered was, and I see no reason why I couldn't also use the counting method, but I would LOVE to pick the brains of some coaches who've had success teaching this to players at that age.

Like I said, I'd really like to hear about the teaching methodology(s) that reached the kids and were successful. Thanks again, coaches.
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on February 12, 2013, 05:43:53 PM
NO DIFFERENT!  Use the EXACT teaching progression on page 1 of this.

If you LIMIT what 10-12 does to the following plays, it will be EASY!!!
1.  Inside Zone
2.  Outside Zone
3.  Reverse to H off Inside Zone Fake (zone blocking)
4.  Toss Sweep with Outside Zone Blocking.
5.  2 Play Actions with Zone Blocking.
NOTE:  You MAY want to use the 3 Step drop back game throwing simple HITCH, FADE, ETC.   Pass Pro = number defenders same as in zone blocking!

If you want to get deeper into these contact me off the site where I can do diagrams!

Best Wishes!
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Dusty Ol Fart on February 12, 2013, 07:00:56 PM
NO DIFFERENT!  Use the EXACT teaching progression on page 1 of this.

If you LIMIT what 10-12 does to the following plays, it will be EASY!!!
1.  Inside Zone
2.  Outside Zone
3.  Reverse to H off Inside Zone Fake (zone blocking)
4.  Toss Sweep with Outside Zone Blocking.
5.  2 Play Actions with Zone Blocking.
NOTE:  You MAY want to use the 3 Step drop back game throwing simple HITCH, FADE, ETC.   Pass Pro = number defenders same as in zone blocking!

If you want to get deeper into these contact me off the site where I can do diagrams!

Best Wishes!

I am reminded of a quote from "The Patriot"   "Aim small, Miss small" 

I agree 100% with what Coach is saying.  Start off basic and add to it as they progress.   ;)
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on February 12, 2013, 10:33:18 PM
I have always admired the offensive philosophy of Tom Moore (who was on numerous Super Bowl winning teams as an "OC" with the Steelers & Colts).  Alex Gibbs preaches the SAME PHILOSOPHY:

TOM MOORE OFFENSIVE THINKING

1.   “LESS IS BETTER”!

2.   “IF THINGS ARE GOING BAD – REDUCE.  GET BETTER AT WHAT YOU DO BEST”!

3.   “DON’T ADD OR CHANGE THINGS (IF IT WAS THAT GOOD – WE WOULD HAVE PUT IT IN DURING AUGUST”)!



FROM AN ARTICLE:   Offensive coordinator Tom Moore is a brilliant minimalist who keeps it simple. He stretches the canvas and lets his quarterback paint masterpieces. Sometimes it seems like the Colts only have four formations and seven plays, but defenses never know what's coming next. 

*******************************************************************************************

Think about it: What does a Tom Moore offense look like? In Pittsburgh, he ran. In Indy, he passes. There's no Shock-and-Awe Mickey Mouse element to his offenses. He doesn't act like he invented the game and he's not angling for a head coaching job somewhere else.

"Coaching is adjusting to circumstances,'' he said. "I don't know any coach who has any particular knowledge that would make any part of football his. There's nothing that hasn't already been done. All we do is try to learn from those who've passed through. All coaches are directly tied to their players. It's really no more complicated than that.

''Whatever works”.




Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on February 13, 2013, 10:04:58 AM
I have a one page sheet of diagrams that shows ALL the blocking on the INSIDE ZONE vs. just about every defense we saw (the zone COMBINATIONS are circled). 
NOTE:  The blocking on the OUTSIDE ZONE = the SAME, except the TECHNIQUE is slightly wider.

Anybody wanting this one sheet should email me at:  billmountjoy@yahoo.com  (do so within the next week, because when I move I will not have my computer & computer files handy)!
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Dusty Ol Fart on February 13, 2013, 10:46:56 AM
Its good stuff!!  Easy Quick Reference.  Should make things extremely clear for anyone. 

Thanks Coach!!

Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on February 15, 2013, 10:45:09 PM
CALLING RUNS:

RED = B Gap defended by a DLM

WHITE = B Gap defended by a LB

----------------D--C-B-A--A-B-C---D
X-------------------O-O-C-O-O-Y
-----------------H-------Q--------------------------Z

-------------------------R


ZONE PLAYS:

I.  INSIDE ZONE:  We prefer INSIDE ZONE to the “WHITE” side because the RB has a chance to CRAM the B Gap (because of the “bubble” over the ON G) without having to always make a CUT (“the BEST cut is NO cut”), & because we frequently get 3 double teams on the IZ to the “White” side:

GETTING 3 “VERTICAL” DOUBLE TEAMS ON INSIDE ZONE PLAY TO “WHITE” SIDE:

OBJECTIVE:  PUSH LEVEL 1 (DLM) BACK INTO THE LAPS OF LEVEL 2 (LBers)

 

----------------------------W/S

 

C----------------------------------------------S/S-----------C

--------------------W-------M------S

-----------------------E-----N---T----E

----------------------O-O-O-C-O-O-O

O-----------------------------Q-----------------------------O

 

-------------------------------R

 

INSIDE ZONE LEFT:

LE & LT = (ZONE) DOUBLE DE (#2) TO WLB (#3)

LG & CTR = (ZONE) DOUBLE NOSE (#0) TO MLB (#1)

RG & RT = (ZONE) DOUBLE DT (#1) TO SLB (#2)

RE = (MAN) CUTOFF DE (#3)

RB = 1st. STEP LATERAL WITH PLAYSIDE FOOT, ROLL, CROSSOVER, AND AIM NOSE FOR OUTSIDE LEG OF LG.   CRAM B GAP

QB = OPEN TO 7 O’CLOCK.  AFTER HANDOFF – FAKED NAKED FOR 5 STEPS AWAY FROM P.O.A.

WR’S  “PUSH/CRACK” FROM CORNERS TO SAFETIES

 

II.  OUTSIDE ZONE:  We prefer OUTSIDE ZONE to the “RED” side of the defense because the RB’s SECOND read (his first read – the DE – normally gives his a read to go inside) is generally a 3 technique (on “Red”) as opposed to a “1” or a “Shade” (on “White”), and he can make his decision to cut UP quicker off the 3 tech. (& more straight upfield).  On  "Red" he has a greater chance to cram the C Gap (because of the "bubble" over the ON T that is present in many “RED fronts) - which is what we WANT!


The BIGGEST MISTAKE I see offensive coaches make it that they (in a given game) try to run ALL their plays, from ALL their formations, & run them ALL both right & left (& run them ALL to both "RED" & "WHITE"). That is a recipe for "getting your ass beat".


 
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on February 16, 2013, 10:18:44 PM
ATTACHED are the 5 "CATEGORIES" that ALL fronts can be placed in.  This really simplifies our teaching!
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Test Account on February 16, 2013, 10:48:17 PM
ATTACHED are the 5 "CATEGORIES" that ALL fronts can be placed in.  This really simplifies our teaching!
Bill you need to explain why this is important. Thanks.
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on February 16, 2013, 11:14:56 PM
There are about 30-40 D-fronts lurking around in football today (see ATTACHMENT for just a FEW).  CATEGORIZING them into those FIVE CATEGORIES, makes it EASY to teach blocking.

For just ONE example:  a 3-3 Stack (3-5 Stack), 5-2 Okie, 3-4, ETC. ALL fall into the "OKIE" category, & are ALL blocked the same.

I picked this up several years ago, & if you have ever been to the "COOL" clinic extravaganza of O-Ine Coaches, MOST Pro, College, & even HS coaches are now doing it BECAUSE it is so darned SIMPLE!

Play a little "pencil & legal pad game" by categorizing ALL the ATTACHED D-fronts into those 5 categories.  If there is any confusion, please feel free to PHONE me at:  804-740-44789 (between 11 AM & 6 PM/EASTERN).
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Michael on February 16, 2013, 11:17:44 PM
There are about 30-40 D-fronts lurking around in football today (see ATTACHMENT for just a FEW).  CATEGORIZING them into those FIVE CATEGORIES, makes it EASY to teach blocking.

For just ONE example:  a 3-3 Stack (3-5 Stack), 5-2 Okie, 3-4, ETC. ALL fall into the "OKIE" category, & are ALL blocked the same.

I picked this up several years ago, & if you have ever been to the "COOL" clinic extravaganza of O-Ine Coaches, MOST Pro, College, & even HS coaches are now doing it BECAUSE it is so darned SIMPLE!

Play a little "pencil & legal pad game" by categorizing ALL the ATTACHED D-fronts into those 5 categories.  If there is any confusion, p[lease feel free to PHONE me at:  804-740-44789 (between 11 AM & 6 PM/EASTERN).

Sean Kugler of the Steelers talked a lot about it at the 2011 C.O.O.L. Clinic.
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Test Account on February 16, 2013, 11:21:50 PM
Sean Kugler of the Steelers talked a lot about it at the 2011 C.O.O.L. Clinic.
Kugler was outstanding.
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on February 16, 2013, 11:24:13 PM
Most of the BEST coaches I know are now doing it.  I just got off the phone with a coach who wanted to know how we taught the "POWER" & "COUNTER" blocking.  This is an example I gave him of using the "categories":

1.  VS. ALL  "OKIES" & "UNDERS" = "TREY" (ON T & TE DOUBLE TEAM)

2.  VS ALL"EVEN" & "OVERS" = "DUECE" (ON G & ON T DOUBLE TEAM).

3.  VS ALL "JAM" (BEAR/DOUBLE EAGLE) LOOKS = "GAP" BLOCK.

SIMPLER than trying to teach the play vs. 20 defenses, ETC.

Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Test Account on February 16, 2013, 11:24:48 PM
There are about 30-40 D-fronts lurking around in football today (see ATTACHMENT for just a FEW).  CATEGORIZING them into those FIVE CATEGORIES, makes it EASY to teach blocking.

For just ONE example:  a 3-3 Stack (3-5 Stack), 5-2 Okie, 3-4, ETC. ALL fall into the "OKIE" category, & are ALL blocked the same.

I picked this up several years ago, & if you have ever been to the "COOL" clinic extravaganza of O-Ine Coaches, MOST Pro, College, & even HS coaches are now doing it BECAUSE it is so darned SIMPLE!

Play a little "pencil & legal pad game" by categorizing ALL the ATTACHED D-fronts into those 5 categories.  If there is any confusion, please feel free to PHONE me at:  804-740-44789 (between 11 AM & 6 PM/EASTERN).
Is it possible that while the techniques are different, how you block them in run and pass are the same?
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on February 16, 2013, 11:26:18 PM
Yes - WITHIN a particular scheme.  Take a look at all this on paper.  It's VERY SIMPLE!

ALL "OKIES" = CENTER COVERED & BOTH GUARDS UNCOVERED (by DLM)

ALL "UNDERS" = UNCOVERED GUARD TO SIDE OF STRENGTH

ALL "EVENS" = UNCOVERED CENTER

ALL "OVERS" = UNCOVERED GUARD AWAY FROM STRENGTH

ALL "JAM" LOOKS = CENTER & BOTH GUARDS COVERED.

THAT'S ALL THERE ARE!
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Test Account on February 16, 2013, 11:31:54 PM
lets take this a step further, shall we?


I have 3 blockers, guard, tackle and center  that are covered by a down linemen and linebacker is  stacked somewhere in their or a stacked over or under front, take your pick. I am running zone, I must leverage those 4 defenders with a 4 blockers to account for those 4 defenders and the 4 gap they are most likely accountable for, correct?
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on February 16, 2013, 11:38:41 PM
Depends on what play & what blocking scheme.  The 5 categories deal would hold up WITHIN each seperate scheme.  That way, your coaches & kids wouldn't go nuts because a defender or two moved an inch or two (JUST CATEGORIZE INTO 5 LOOKS).  We don't use blocking calls per se, but it is EASY for the Center to call out OKIE, UNDER, EVEN. OVER, OR JAM (if you wish).

PS: WE have ONLY the ZONE scheme, & the GAP scheme (Counter/Power) & Pass Pro,  & this works out BEAUTIFULLY for OUR kids!

MUCH easier to discuss this via phone, because I don't know your offense. 
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Test Account on February 16, 2013, 11:42:28 PM
Depends on what play & what blocking scheme.  The 5 categories deal would hold up WITHIN each seperate scheme.  That way, your coaches & kids wouldn't go nuts because a defender or two moved an inch or two (JUST CATEGORIZE INTO 5 LOOKS).  We don't use blocking calls per se, but it is EASY for the Center to call out OKIE, UNDER, EVEN. OVER, OR JAM (if you wish).

PS: WE have ONLY the ZONE scheme, & the GAP scheme (Counter/Power) & Pass Pro,  & this works out BEAUTIFULLY for OUR kids!

MUCH easier to discuss this via phone, because I don't know your offense.
With in each of those categories though are special adjustments, correct?
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Test Account on February 16, 2013, 11:56:53 PM
Not in MY offense.

Here is an ATTACHED sheet from the Green Bay Packers (one of my former players is on their staff).

THIS shows how they write up OUTSIDE ZONE rules using those FIVE CATEGORIES.  It tells the player what block to use according to the category.  You could run a THOUSAND defenses aqainst them & this simple sheet is ALL they have to know.

Don't think I can give a better example.

PS:  You won't recognize what they  CALL their blocks, but they are ALL zone combinations used by every zone coach.  Once again - EASIER TO EXPLAIN VIA PHONE (but our kids picked this up REAL QUICVK)
you have those adjustment that I am referring to.  Not complicated if you understand those front families.
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on February 17, 2013, 12:02:33 AM
Correct.,  It is easier to work vs. 5 fronts than 30. 

Note:  Since they blocked OKIE & UNDER essentially the same;  EVEN & OVER essentially the same; & JAM usually stands by itself, they are using only THREE block variations (present in ALL zone offenses I know of, but this makes it MUCH SIMPLER than trying to learn all this vs ALL the possible fronts out there)!!!

PS:  85% of the time we see OVER/UNDER/EVEN.  15% = OKIE OR JAM.

PPS:  It's midnight & I am going to bed.  PHONE if need be tomorrow.
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: dan82564 on February 17, 2013, 10:11:19 AM
Most of the BEST coaches I know are now doing it.  I just got off the phone with a coach who wanted to know how we taught the "POWER" & "COUNTER" blocking.  This is an example I gave him of using the "categories":

1.  VS. ALL  "OKIES" & "UNDERS" = "TREY" (ON T & TE DOUBLE TEAM)

Who Blocks the S on Okies & Unders?
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Test Account on February 17, 2013, 10:13:32 AM
Most of the BEST coaches I know are now doing it.  I just got off the phone with a coach who wanted to know how we taught the "POWER" & "COUNTER" blocking.  This is an example I gave him of using the "categories":

1.  VS. ALL  "OKIES" & "UNDERS" = "TREY" (ON T & TE DOUBLE TEAM)

Who Blocks the S on Okies & Unders?
sam would be the kickout.
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: mahonz on February 17, 2013, 03:17:05 PM
Bill

I was really hoping Coach Moore would take over as OC in Denver when Coach McCoy took over as HC in San Diego.

Dang It !

Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on February 17, 2013, 04:53:39 PM
Would have been good for Denver!!!
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on February 19, 2013, 09:57:24 AM
ATTACHED is a Power Point presentation I used at a Mega Clinic on the Outside Zone:
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Oxfordcoach on March 16, 2013, 01:34:16 PM
don't know if this has been posted yet

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eapTYIeEzpQ
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Jburk on March 16, 2013, 02:21:14 PM
Found these diagrams illustrating responsibilities for both GAP and ZONE schemes.
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on May 12, 2013, 09:43:06 PM
Denver Broncos bringing Alex Gibbs back as offensive line consultant

DENVER BRONCOS, NFL

Alex Gibbs will return as a consultant for the Broncos. (Brian Bahr/Getty Staff)

The Denver Broncos will bring Alex Gibbs back as an offensive line consultant, The Denver Post reports. Gibbs, 72, once served as the team’s offensive line coach from 1995 to 2003. The Broncos won two Super Bowls with Gibbs as the offensive line coach. Gibbs’ offensive blocking schemes assisted running back Terrell Davis and quarterback John Elway excel in the Broncos offense.

Broncos head coach John Fox said Gibbs would be “a good resource” and believes Gibbs can help the current Broncos offense. Last season, the Broncos brought in quarterback Peyton Manning’s former offensive coordinator with the Indianapolis Colts as part of a mandatory minicamp.

The Broncos were 16th in the league in rushing yards and 5th in total passing yards.
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Test Account on May 12, 2013, 09:50:08 PM
Denver Broncos bringing Alex Gibbs back as offensive line consultant

DENVER BRONCOS, NFL

Alex Gibbs will return as a consultant for the Broncos. (Brian Bahr/Getty Staff)

The Denver Broncos will bring Alex Gibbs back as an offensive line consultant, The Denver Post reports. Gibbs, 72, once served as the team’s offensive line coach from 1995 to 2003. The Broncos won two Super Bowls with Gibbs as the offensive line coach. Gibbs’ offensive blocking schemes assisted running back Terrell Davis and quarterback John Elway excel in the Broncos offense.

Broncos head coach John Fox said Gibbs would be “a good resource” and believes Gibbs can help the current Broncos offense. Last season, the Broncos brought in quarterback Peyton Manning’s former offensive coordinator with the Indianapolis Colts as part of a mandatory minicamp.

The Broncos were 16th in the league in rushing yards and 5th in total passing yards.
anybody doubt that is going to be their running game :) they move way up my list of teams I want to watch next year.....because the boots/naked wont be of emphasis....should be interesting.
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Michael on May 12, 2013, 09:56:20 PM
http://www.denverpost.com/broncos/ci_23227637/broncos-bring-back-alex-gibbs-offensive-line-consultant
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Texan on May 13, 2013, 12:13:11 AM
Denver Broncos bringing Alex Gibbs back as offensive line consultant

DENVER BRONCOS, NFL

Alex Gibbs will return as a consultant for the Broncos. (Brian Bahr/Getty Staff)

The Denver Broncos will bring Alex Gibbs back as an offensive line consultant, The Denver Post reports. Gibbs, 72, once served as the team’s offensive line coach from 1995 to 2003. The Broncos won two Super Bowls with Gibbs as the offensive line coach. Gibbs’ offensive blocking schemes assisted running back Terrell Davis and quarterback John Elway excel in the Broncos offense.

Broncos head coach John Fox said Gibbs would be “a good resource” and believes Gibbs can help the current Broncos offense. Last season, the Broncos brought in quarterback Peyton Manning’s former offensive coordinator with the Indianapolis Colts as part of a mandatory minicamp.

The Broncos were 16th in the league in rushing yards and 5th in total passing yards.

Oh yeah. Us doncos fans are happy. 
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: coachnick on December 16, 2013, 08:42:37 PM
Stopped by for a brief visit.  There has been a lot of discussion on "ALEX GIBBS" Zone Blocking.  There are MANY ways to teach zone blocking, but his way is the only way WE ran it.  I'm not saying it is the best way, nor the only way, but I have never seen anyone teach it better than Alex!

I am prepared to discuss HIS methods, and answer any questions anyone might have.  To START with - here are HIS basics for anyone that might be interested:

NOTE:  O-LINE SPLITS = 18” (CONSISTENT).  OLM OFF THE BALL (HANDS ON CENTER'S SHOELACES):


INSIDE ZONE TECHNIQUE (DRIVE BLOCK TECHNIQUES):

A.   COVERED:  Take a 6” lead step aiming eyes at playside number.  Second step to crotch (do not crossover).  Hands at base of shoulder pads.

1.   If DLM stretches with you – stay on block and uncovered teammate works up on LBer.

2.   If DLM anchors on you – double team with uncovered teammate.  Stay on block until wiped off & then work upfield  aiming eyes to playside number of LBer.

3.   If DLM slants inside – force him to flatten his slant and double team with uncovered teammate.  Stay on block until wiped off & then work upfield aiming eyes to playside number of LBer.

B.   UNCOVERED:  Take a 6” lead step aiming eyes at helmet of DLM.  Do not cross over on second step.

1.   If helmet goes out on your 1st step  – 2nd step upfield aiming eyes to playside number of LBer.

2.   If helmet stays put – double team (hip to hip) with covered teammate & wipe him off on Lber.

3.   If helmet slants inside - get eyes to his playside number.  Double team with covered teammate & wipe him off on LBer.



OUTSIDE ZONE TECHNIQUE (REACH BLOCK TECHNIQUES):

A.    COVERED:  Take a 6” lead step aiming eyes at playside arm pit.  Second step slightly outside crotch (do not crossover).  Inside hand on midline & outside hand under armpit.

1.   If DLM stretches with you – stay on block and uncovered teammate works up on LBer.

2.   If DLM anchors on you – stay on block with eyes on playside arm pit. 
 
3.   If DLM slants inside – force him to flatten his slant by stiff arming him inside.  Stay on block until you feel uncovered teammate & then come off aiming eyes to playside number of LBer.

B.   UNCOVERED:  Take a 6” lead step aiming eyes at helmet of DLM.  You may crossover on second step.

1.   If helmet goes out & you haven’t contacted DLM by 3rd. step – work upfield  aiming eyes to playside armpit of LBer.

2.   If helmet stays put – shove him over to covered teammate and work upfield aiming eyes to playside armpit of LBer.

3.   If helmet slants inside – aim eyes to his playside armpit.  Take him over & wipe covered teammate off to LBer.






ZONE RULES:

TEACH “COVERED/UNCOVERED” (TO DETERMINES WHO ZONE BLOCKS
           AND WHO MAN BLOCKS).

A.   IF YOU ARE UNCOVERED (BY A DLM) – ZONE WITH YOUR PLAYSIDE TEAMMATE.

B.   IF YOU ARE COVERED (BY A DLM) – ZONE WITH YOUR BACKSIDE TEAMMATE (UNLESS HE IS COVERED THEN YOU MUST MAN BLOCK).

NOTE:  IF YOUR MAN IS STACKED IN A “TANDEM” – ZONE WITH TEAMMATE WHOSE MAN IS ALSO STACKED.

*******************************************************************************************

QB/RB TECHNIQUES ON INSIDE & OUTSIDE ZONE:



I.   INSIDE ZONE:

A)   QB:  OPEN TO TITE 5 O’CLOCK (RIGHT) OR 7 O’CLOCK (LEFT).  USE 2ND STEP FOR DEPTH.  EXTEND BALL – MESH POINT ON 3RD STEP.  THE 4TH STEP BEGINS NAKED MECHANICS.  GOOD FAKE OF NAKED AWAY – DRIVE FOR 5 STEPS.  NO PEEK BACK – FINISH!


B)   RB (TOES @ 7 1/2 YARDS):  FOOTWORK:  OPEN STEP, CROSS OVER, LAND MARK OUTSIDE LEG OF GUARD.   PRESS THE HOLE.  SHOULDERS PARALLEL TO L.O.S.  READ:  1ST DLM FROM INSIDE-OUT  PLAYSIDE (EXCLUDING A SHADED NOSE).  VS. BUBBLE OVER G – READ MAN ON T -  IF HE GIVES A READ TO CUT INSIDE – READ THE NOSE.
COACHING POINT:  MAKE YOUR DECISION NO LATER THAN YOUR 3rd STEP (TO CRAM B GAP OR MAKE A CUT) - MAKE ONE CUT & LIVE WITH IT!
CP:  ON THE INSIDE ZONE – THE BEST CUT IS “NO CUT”!!!





II.   OUTSIDE ZONE:

A)   QB:  OPEN TO 4 O’CLOCK (RIGHT) OR 8 O’CLOCK (LEFT)  FOR EXTRA WIDTH.  USE 2ND STEP FOR ADDITIONAL WIDTH.  EXTEND BALL – MESH POINT ON 3rd STEP.  THE 4TH STEP BEGINS NAKED MECHANICS.  GOOD FAKE OF NAKED AWAY – DRIVE FOR 5 STEPS.  NO PEEK BACK – FINISH.

             
B)   RB (DEPTH:  TOES @ 7 ½ YARDS).  FOOTWORK:  HITCH
KICK TO BUTT OF TE.  READ DE (OR FIRST DLM FROM OUTSIDE-IN PLAYSIDE) – IF DE GIVES YOU A READ TO CUT UP – READ THE NEXT DLM INSIDE (DT).   IF DE GIVES YOU A READ TO GO OUT – TAKE IT.
COACHING POINT:  MAKE YOUR DECISION NO LATER THAN YOUR 3RD STEP (TO CUT UP OR GO OUTSIDE)  - MAKE ONE CUT & LIVE WITH IT!

CP:  Cuts on the third step are made on the right foot going right, & the left foot going left.

Bill on the inside zone play verses a standard 50 defense is the rb reading the head up nose guard ? 
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Dusty Ol Fart on December 16, 2013, 09:43:20 PM
I may be wrong but his aiming point is the outside leg of the guard / Inside leg of the tackle and his read is the play side inside backer, Mike or other wise.  There shouldn't be a lot of thought here!!

Zone Blocking is more about teaching the backs than the line.   ;)
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on December 16, 2013, 09:54:38 PM
I may be wrong but his aiming point is the outside leg of the guard / Inside leg of the tackle and his read is the play side inside backer, Mike or other wise.  There shouldn't be a lot of thought here!!

Zone Blocking is more about teaching the backs than the line.   ;)


Alex Gibbs NEVER let his RB read a LBer:   The following IS from Alex Gibbs:

INSIDE ZONE:
RB:  READ THE HAT OF THE FIRST DLM OUTSIDE THE CENTER (NOT COUNTING A SHADE).  IF HE GOES OUT OR DOESN’T MOVE – ROLLBACK READING THE HAT OF THE NEXT DLM INSIDE.  IF HE GOES DOWN – READ THE HAT OF THE NEXT MAN ON LOS OUTSIDE OF HIM FOR YOUR CUT.  BASICALLY – IF THE DLM YOU ARE READING DOESN’T PINCH INSIDE, ROLL BACK.  DETERMINE WHERE CUT WILL BE WHEN YOU REACH HEELS OF ORIGINAL ALIGN OF O-LINE.

ATTACHED is an actual playbook page on the IZ sent me by Alex.  RB READ = CIRCLED IN RED:

Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Dusty Ol Fart on December 16, 2013, 10:01:42 PM

Alex Gibbs NEVER let his RB read a LBer:   The following IS from Alex Gibbs:

INSIDE ZONE:
RB:  READ THE HAT OF THE FIRST DLM OUTSIDE THE CENTER (NOT COUNTING A SHADE).  IF HE GOES OUT OR DOESN’T MOVE – ROLLBACK READING THE HAT OF THE NEXT DLM INSIDE.  IF HE GOES DOWN – READ THE HAT OF THE NEXT MAN ON LOS OUTSIDE OF HIM FOR YOUR CUT.  BASICALLY – IF THE DLM YOU ARE READING DOESN’T PINCH INSIDE, ROLL BACK.  DETERMINE WHERE CUT WILL BE WHEN YOU REACH HEELS OF ORIGINAL ALIGN OF ON G.

As I said Bill... I may be wrong.... ;)   I still had the Landmark right, 1 point for me.  Even a rules based coach larns a few things, over time..... 8)
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on December 16, 2013, 10:10:57 PM
As I said Bill... I may be wrong.... ;)   I still had the Landmark right, 1 point for me.  Even a rules based coach larns a few things, over time..... 8)



ATTACHED is an actual playbook page on the IZ sent me by Alex.  RB READ = CIRCLED IN RED:

PS:  You do NOT read LBers.  That would be like running thru several Cobras (DLM) to get to a pretty girl (LB).  If your eyes are on the pretty girl, you'll get bitten by the damned Cobras!
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on December 16, 2013, 10:23:59 PM
NOBODY, absolutely NOBODY ever had more SUSTAINED success in ZONE BLOCKING than Alex Gibbs!  His teams usually led the ENTIRE NFL in rushing (so did his RB's in yards per carry).  Practically EVERY zone coach I know (from Pee Wee to Pro) COPIED his methods!

Going BACK to 1981 = I personally studied the teaching of EVERY successful "Zone" coach.  With the exception of Joe Bugel (Redskins) it was WASTED TIME to look beyond A. Gibbs' teaching!

Bugel & A Gibbs taught it the SAME!  They learned from EACH OTHER!
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on December 17, 2013, 08:13:48 AM
ATTACHED is an ARTICLE by Alex Gibbs on the "OUTSIDE ZONE".  Much in it about RB "landmark" & "reads"!

This is the ONLY writeup Alex ever put out on his OZ (ATTACHED):
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Dimson on December 17, 2013, 08:26:54 AM
Bill, what do you mean by roll back?
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on December 17, 2013, 08:59:58 AM
Bill, what do you mean by roll back?

CUT-BACK (but instead of it always being a "jump-cut" with your shoulders square - you do more of "bend" or "roll").  He would roll-back on IZ (if his read told him to), but on OZ it was more of a CUT-UP (plant your foot & head "North"). 

That is the best explanation I can give.  You need to watch a LOT of film on him to SEE this!

Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: ZACH on December 17, 2013, 09:54:04 AM
CUT-BACK (but instead of it always being a "jump-cut" with your shoulders square - you do more of "bend" or "roll").  He would roll-back on IZ (if his read told him to), but on OZ it was more of a CUT-UP (plant your foot & head "North"). 

That is the best explanation I can give.  You need to watch a LOT of film on him to SEE this!

I saw some coach cuts of Adrian Peterson he does this a lot
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on December 17, 2013, 10:24:32 AM
I saw some coach cuts of Adrian Peterson he does this a lot




It depends on what he sees & where he is headed.   Can look different every snap.

IDEALLY the "BEST CUT IS NO CUT" (because the shortest distance between two points is always straight ahead)!  We LOVE to CRAM the B GAP on IZ, & either CRAM the C GAP (or take it WIDE) on OZ.  This is what we (& A Gibbs & Joe Bugel) worked for.  By calling IZ to WHITE, & OZ to RED = it helps you ACCOMPLISH this (running at the "BUBBLES").  I have talked about this MANY TIMES before on DumCoach!
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: coachnick on December 17, 2013, 10:56:44 AM
we do the basic jump cut drills for our zone play....is there another drill for the "roll back" or will the jump cut drills cover it?
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on December 17, 2013, 11:09:22 AM
we do the basic jump cut drills for our zone play....is there another drill for the "roll back" or will the jump cut drills cover it?


No - same drills - different cut.  We do VERY LITTLE INDIVIDUAL DRILLS, because football is a TEAM game, & the RB needs to see the "BIG PICTURE" (a lot of bodies flying all around), THUS - we primarily do the following drills where (depending on WHAT he sees & where he goes) he MIGHT "CRAM THE AIMING POINT", "jump cut", OR "roll-back":

LARGE GROUP: (LIVE)

A) "7 ON 5" (Live - NO bags)


-----------M
-----E--T---T--E
-----O-O-C-O-O
----------Q

----------R

4-3 = Gives the Center a chance to zone with Guards (on zone TO callside)



---------B----B
------E----N----E
------O-O-C-O-O
-----------Q

-----------R

3-4 Gives the Guards a chance to zone with Tackles (on zone TO callside) or Center (on zone AWAY callside)


B) "9 on 7" (Live - no bags)


-----------W---M----S
--------E-----T---T-----E
--------O-O-O-C-O-O-O
---------------Q

---------------R

4-3 = Gives the Tackles a chance to zone with the TE's (on zone TO callside), or the Guards (on zone AWAY callside)


NOTE: The "7 on 5" & "9 on 7" should be your best ("O") vs. best ("D"). Full speed with no tackling the RB. Benefits of these:

1.  BEST WAY FOR RB TO LEARN HIS READS (& entrance points at LOS);
2.  COMPETITIVE DRILLS VS. DEFENSE;
3.  BLOCKING TECHNIQUES VS. BLOCK REACTIONS;
4.  TEACHES TOUGHNESS!!!!!


************************************************************************

C.  TEAM (11 vs. 11)
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on December 17, 2013, 03:00:26 PM
Some EXAMPLES of RB moves on IZ vs. WHITE" (where we LIKE to run it).  Will not have time to draw this vs. EVERYTHING but these are good examples of things we see when we run it to the "white" side.  This is also a good example of what Alex Gibbs means when he says that "once the RB gets his READ - he must be aware of what the NEXT down lineman is doing to the side his read tells him to GO to".

Since we don't CALL it to "RED" - don't need any "what-if's" on that point (see ATTACHMENT):
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Dimson on December 17, 2013, 03:28:29 PM
Do you at least wrap up the RB?
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on December 17, 2013, 08:50:00 PM
Do you at least wrap up the RB?


Yes!  We go back and see what HAPPENED on the block on the FIRST MAN to get TO the RB (correct "mistakes").  HELPS to video these sessions to show players.
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on December 18, 2013, 02:07:17 PM
Alex Gibbs' writing on the RB steps, reads & landmarks on the OZ (ATTACHED):
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: ZACH on December 18, 2013, 02:30:11 PM
Backer on Ball

In 2 back:
Gibbs archs playside TE
Fb has force block
Rb reads go closer to pst.

This is from alex gibbs zone developments part 4

Gibbs is talking about running wide zone into a 3-4 (white).

Bill: it seems like when folks run tight into red or wide into white theres a whole bunch of calls and adjustments.  Granted these are pro coaches... is any of this worth the time of youth or high school?
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on December 18, 2013, 03:12:08 PM
Backer on Ball

In 2 back:
Gibbs archs playside TE
Fb has force block
Rb reads go closer to pst.

This is from alex gibbs zone developments part 4

Gibbs is talking about running wide zone into a 3-4 (white).

Bill: it seems like when folks run tight into red or wide into white theres a whole bunch of calls and adjustments.  Granted these are pro coaches... is any of this worth the time of youth or high school?


DO NOT NEEDLESSLY COMPLICATE THIS OFFENSE.  Trust me when I tell you I have zone blocked SINCE 1981, and tried it BOTH WAYS.  What I tell you below works BEST!

Our simple rules NEVER CHANGE, and YOU DO NOT NEED CALLS (in Red OR White).  If you know where your # man is, & if you are covered or uncovered, WHY THE HELL DO YOU NEED CALLS?.  Joe Bugel TAUGHT zone blocking to Alex Gibbs, & "Buges" sold ME on not making calls.  Alex blocks EVERYTHING exactly the SAME = he just likes the calls (& WHY is "another story" that would NOT apply to you OR me).

The best of the "HOGS" (HOF OG RUSS GRIMM) says "YOU DO NOT NEED CALLS IN THIS OFFENSE"!!

If you look at Alex's OZ play sheet (from HIS personal notebook) - you will SEE our rules hold up and we get the SAME THING.
ATTACHED is his OZ play sheet & ALL OUR RULES ABIDE!
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on December 18, 2013, 09:28:49 PM
Backer on Ball

In 2 back:
Gibbs archs playside TE
Fb has force block
Rb reads go closer to pst.

This is from alex gibbs zone developments part 4

Gibbs is talking about running wide zone into a 3-4 (white).

Bill: it seems like when folks run tight into red or wide into white theres a whole bunch of calls and adjustments.  Granted these are pro coaches... is any of this worth the time of youth or high school?


WHEN WOULD YOU NEED BLOCKING CALLS IN ZONE BLOCKING?

If you come to the ball and go on a quick count (which we do 50% of the time) defenses won’t “stem” (AKA: “jump”) looks, because they would not have TIME.  For THIS reason - defenses WE see get lined up super quick in what they will end up in!  In this case – you simply find your NUMBERED man (usually in front of you on or off the ball), and apply “covered/uncovered” principles.  NO CALLS NECESSARY!  This is the "BEST CASE SCENARIO"!

If you go through a LONG cadence (with QB “machinations”) like Manning does, & Elway did in Denver, the defense will have time to STEM and "time it up" when the O-Line makes their calls.   Alex Gibbs DRILLED this & sometimes they changed the INITIAL blocking call once or even twice.  IN THIS CASE YOU HAVE TO MAKE ANOTHER CALL BECAUSE THE INITIAL CALL WOULD BE NO GOOD!  NOTE:  Teams that do it this way go to the line with 2-3 play "packages" & do a LOT of changing on the play(s) = TOO MUCH for High School, & below levels of play.

PS:  We played a team that LOVED to "stem" from an "OKIE" ("white" with OG uncovered) to an "EAGLE" ("red" with OG covered) & vice-verse.  They could NOT do this vs. us because of our "tempo".
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on December 19, 2013, 12:30:26 PM
Good article about former "HOG" Russ Grimm;  He USED this method in 4 Super Bowls as a player with the Skins (3 of them WINS); as an Assistant with the Steelers in a Super Bowl WIN; and as an Assistant with the Cards in a Super Bowl loss.

Grimm has simple approach

Kent Somers
The Arizona Republic
Aug. 7, 2007 07:12 PM

Effective simplicity

Some coaches like to hand out playbooks containing intricately designed plays, complete with footnotes that explain how assignments can change depending on the defensive look.

When Grimm is teaching, each player draws the play. Grimm goes over the assignments and how the play will look against various schemes.

"It's always better if you make them write it down," Grimm says. "They're better at taking notes than if you give them the whole play with all the little descriptions underneath. I make them write it down, and then we go over it every night.

"I start with the play, I make them understand what everybody else is doing on the play."

CHECK THIS: It sounds complicated, but Grimm reminds his linemen of this: When the ball is snapped, either you'll have a guy in front of you or you won't. He gives them a set of simple rules for either situation to avoid any blown assignments.

"I think maybe his approach is unique," says Whisenhunt, who worked with Grimm with the Steelers for six years. "He kind of takes what we're doing and puts it into rules that simplify it for the offensive line. He has a great way of categorizing their responsibilities and putting it together that, to me, has been pretty unique."

Grimm's method eliminates the need for multiple calls at the line of scrimmage. When they break the huddle, his linemen might note the defensive front.  But that's it. And that's unusual in the NFL. "There's none of that panic up there," center Al Johnson says. "It equates to a lot less mental errors, a lot less confusion."
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Vince148 on December 23, 2013, 09:31:14 AM
More Gibbs zone blocking info...

http://hawgtuff.net/yahoo_site_admin/assets/docs/ALEX_GIBBS_ON_THE_OUTSIDE_ZONE.186202030.pdf (http://hawgtuff.net/yahoo_site_admin/assets/docs/ALEX_GIBBS_ON_THE_OUTSIDE_ZONE.186202030.pdf)

http://www.slideshare.net/tomneuman/fball-gibbs-alex-gibbs-zone-coaching-points (http://www.slideshare.net/tomneuman/fball-gibbs-alex-gibbs-zone-coaching-points)
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on December 23, 2013, 01:13:31 PM
More Gibbs zone blocking info...

http://hawgtuff.net/yahoo_site_admin/assets/docs/ALEX_GIBBS_ON_THE_OUTSIDE_ZONE.186202030.pdf (http://hawgtuff.net/yahoo_site_admin/assets/docs/ALEX_GIBBS_ON_THE_OUTSIDE_ZONE.186202030.pdf)

http://www.slideshare.net/tomneuman/fball-gibbs-alex-gibbs-zone-coaching-points (http://www.slideshare.net/tomneuman/fball-gibbs-alex-gibbs-zone-coaching-points)


Google for the 2002 and/or 2004 Denver Broncos PLAYBOOKS.  Best overview on his OZ & IZ plays (also his COUNTER to TE side, & Truck Toss to SE side).
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on December 24, 2013, 10:10:10 AM
Alex Gibbs (born February 22, 1941 in Morgantown, North Carolina) is a former NFL offensive line coach and former assistant NFL head coach. He currently serves as an offensive line consultant for the American football team the Denver Broncos. Gibbs is a well known proponent of the Zone Blocking scheme and popularized its use while he was Offensive line coach of the Denver Broncos. Denver became famous at that time for its use of smaller, more agile offensive linemen and the success of its running backs, most notably Terrell Davis. Gibbs was to enter his first season on Pete Carroll's Seattle Seahawks staff as the Assistant Head Coach and Offensive Line coach in 2010, but announced his unexpected retirement a week before the start of the NFL's 2010 regular season. In May 2013 he returned to the Denver Broncos in a consultant role.
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on December 28, 2013, 08:43:02 AM

Groundswell
Published Wednesday, Dec 7, 2005 at 2:32 pm EST
Paul Attner Sporting News


It is the winter after his first season as Broncos coach and Mike Shanahan is troubled. His running game is not as dominant as he would like, with too many negative plays. And he's concerned that the finesse aspects of his West Coast offense are not projecting the image he desires for his team. So he and Alex Gibbs, his offensive line coach and friend, devise something uniquely their own -- a curiously different run approach that calls for zone blocking built on a foundation of toughness and physicality.

Ten years later, the brilliance of their creation is at its peak. The running scheme born from their talented minds drives the NFL's two top rushing teams. The Broncos and Falcons are grinding toward franchise-record running seasons, their playoff desires grounded firmly in the intricacies of the league's most devilish and intriguing method of line blocking.

For the Falcons, their success on the ground follows a 2004 season in which Gibbs, in his first and only year as their full-time line coach, transformed Atlanta's running game from mediocre to No. 1 in the league. It's a status the team has maintained this season with a 177.8 yards-per-game average that projects as the NFL's highest in 35 years. For the Broncos, their running prowess offers them a potential ball control solution to overcoming the Colts in January.

The effectiveness of this rushing scheme is fascinating, considering all the analysis it has endured by the best defensive minds the league could offer. These clubs have the NFL's two smallest lines -- both average less than 300 pounds -- and neither has a player atop the rushing standings. Yet Atlanta has gained 200 or more yards in five games, and Denver's 162.7-yard average projects to the highest of the 11-year Shanahan era, during which the Broncos have the most running yards of any NFL franchise.

This season, the two teams also are 1-2 in two important and revealing categories: yards per carry (each averages more than 5.0) and lowest percentage of attempts resulting in lost yards.

Let's embark on an exploration to uncover the secrets behind this Bronco Scheme, an approach that doesn't pull guards and tackles, doesn't employ the counter trey and doesn't feature many traps or draws yet is so amazingly successful.

The first time Falcons running back Warrick Dunn tries to be creative by making a couple of moves before cutting into a hole, he hears the voice of Gibbs. "One cut downhill ... one cut downhill," Gibbs screams. It was Dunn's introduction last season to the demanding details of the Bronco Scheme. "There is just one way to do everything they ask," he says. "Or you don't play."

Denver and Atlanta don't have many running plays. The Broncos, for example, might bring no more than 12 into a game. But the success of the scheme is not tied to quantity; it excels because of the ability of the offense to execute with precision the exacting requirements of each of these few plays. Behind all of it has been the bellowing of Gibbs, first in Denver and now in Atlanta, where he serves this season as a consultant who spends a few days each week with the team. This 5-7 bundle of passion, vulgarity and brilliance -- his players joke he is Napoleon on speed -- mixes demeaning authoritarianism and an incredible grasp of the concepts into success. An eccentric football genius with a doctorate in education, he crashed and burned in Denver in 2000, finally needing psychiatric help and medication.

Yet Gibbs became Jim Mora's most important hire as a rookie head coach in 2004. No NFL rushing method could make better use of Michael Vick's talents, considering how the Bronco Scheme, with its focus on inside runs, functions best with the bona fide outside threat of quarterback bootlegs.

"To make their system complete, you need to fear the quarterback running that boot to your weak side," Bucs linebackers coach Joe Barry says. "With Atlanta, you have a freaking rocket ship coming out of there at quarterback. The whole scheme is a bitch to defend. Both teams don't do a lot. So no matter what the defense does, they are able to practice against it because they aren't bogging down their players with too many runs." It's what Redskins defensive line coach Greg Blache calls the "Colonel Sanders" philosophy: "They do one thing well; they do chicken right." But having Vick gives the Falcons the edge over Denver in rushing. He has 470 yards this season after gaining 902 yards -- the third most by a quarterback in NFL history -- in 2004.

Yet the Bronco Scheme doesn't need a Vick to excel. Shanahan has produced five different 1,000-yard rushers -- most of whom have been low-round draft choices -- including 1995 sixth-round pick Terrell Davis, who gained 2,008 yards in 1998. Ron Dayne, a flop with the Giants, set up the winning field goal against Dallas on Thanksgiving with a 55-yard overtime run. "He is a 1,000-yard rusher in our system as a starter," says Shanahan matter-of-factly. Oh, yes, Dayne is a third-string back. In Atlanta, Dunn, who rushed for 1,106 yards last season, already has accumulated 1,174 this fall, a career high for the ninth-year veteran.

So it's the system, not the backs, right? Not really. The Broncos never sign a jitterbug back whose instincts push him toward multiple fakes and ad-lib scrambles. Dunn had those tendencies pre-Gibbs; to function in the system, he has transformed himself. He now is a one-cut runner whose goal on every carry is to avoid negative yards. So if there is no hole, he plows ahead anyway. "We're taught to gain at least a blade of grass on every attempt," says Falcons fullback Fred McCrary. If you are indecisive and unwilling to be tough and run downhill, you won't run for these teams.

Still, it is what happens up front, among the athletic, quick and, for the NFL, small linemen that makes the Bronco Scheme different and so effective. To uncover why, we need to go to the videotape.

On the huge screen is a football choreography contrary to anything you'd anticipate about this most muscular of sports. In lock step, linemen move:

shoulders square, in perfect balance, sliding effortlessly down the scrimmage line, nearly 1,500 pounds of nimbleness -- a dance of intricacy and precision. These images, on this large screen within the headquarters of NFL Films, display the foundation of all that has been dominant about the Bronco Scheme. Before T.J. Duckett or Mike Anderson can gain a yard, their linemen must first become Baryshnikovs in shoulder pads, drilled to work in unison, geared to frustrate defenders unable to crack the formidable barrier presented by this picket fence in motion.

Several years ago, Denver's linemen had another term to describe their meticulousness.

Trained seals.

Here on the screen, the current Broncos linemen are working against the Redskins' defense. The usual NFL approach to run blocking is macho-oriented. You take on opponents man-to-man, firing straight into them alone or in tandem with a teammate, with the goal to knock them up the field, away from the line and apart from each other. The ultimate triumph of this mentality is the pancake block -- sending the defender onto his derriere. But the Bronco Scheme is based on zone blocking, in which you worry about protecting an area and the defenders who intrude into it. The movement is lateral, not straight ahead. The pivotal word here is stretch -- the linemen want to stretch the field and force the defense to run laterally with them. The more it stretches, the more creases open for the running back.

On virtually every stretch play, you will see multiple double-teams by the linemen -- what they call a "hat and one-half" on each down defender. The heads of the linemen are always up; they are constantly looking, moving. Once the double-teamed defender is under control, one of the Broncos' linemen will split away seamlessly and move to the next zone, the next opponent, lending help to another teammate. Or he will scurry to the next level to hunt down linebackers and safeties. On the backside, away from the direction of the running back, the linemen frequently use cut blocks -- blocks aimed at the thighs and rolled to the feet -- to knock down defenders and limit pursuit. It is a controversial block -- defensive players hate it because it attacks their legs -- but it is legal and has a purpose.

"You knock down a 330-pound nose tackle for three quarters and he is really tired in the fourth," says FOX and Sporting News analyst Brian Baldinger, a former NFL lineman and our videotape guide on this day. "So all of a sudden he is too fatigued to make the same tackle he made in the first half. And that

3-yard run becomes a 30-yarder." So the Bronco Scheme preaches patience. "It is a philosophy," says Mora. "You have to stay with the run and not abandon it. You have to have the mentality that the big plays will happen, that the big holes will be there." On third-and-5 or -6, when most teams pass, these two clubs just as often run, frequently from three-receiver sets. The Falcons average almost 35 carries a game, the Broncos 33. The rest of the league averages 27.

It is so maddening and methodical, this unrelenting stretch-the-field approach. "They block everything so it looks like an outside run, but it's not," says Dolphins middle linebacker Zach Thomas. "They're not trying to get to the edge; they are trying to run between the tackles. But they're moving the line sideways and waiting for you to commit. It's tough because everything you're taught to do on an outside run is to attack, and you have to fight your instincts." Because if a defender attacks, that's when he's nudged out of the way and the runner cuts into the resulting hole. Or, if the defense really overpursues, he cuts dramatically, in back of everyone. And that's when the scheme's emphasis on cutting down backside pursuit and sending linemen upfield to help receivers block linebackers and defensive backs leads to long gains.

"If we are running it well, you can hear defensive guys muttering to themselves in the fourth quarter," Falcons right guard Kynan Forney says. "They are tired, they don't want to tackle anymore. Basically, they lose life; you can feel it." To constantly move sideways and stay in front of defenders requires players with quickness and athleticism. Both franchises have found these linemen mostly in the lower rounds; five of the 10 starters were picked after the fourth round, and another, Denver left tackle Matt Lepsis, was an undrafted college tight end. But the Bronco Scheme allows someone such as Denver center Tom Nalen (6-3, 286) to become a dominant player, a potential Hall of Famer.

"They play with a great awareness," Baldinger says. "They don't block guys who have no chance of making a play. And they give a defense so much to think about: the stretch, the cutback, the bootleg, the reverse. It slows defenses down, makes them have to play perfect on every snap."

It also is why Shanahan was eager to bring in Jake Plummer to replace slow-footed Brian Griese at quarterback two years ago. With Griese, the bootleg part of the scheme disappeared; with Plummer, it has returned with a flourish.

"It takes smart people to play this system," former Broncos lineman David Diaz-Infante says. "The guys are so good at knowing who to block. If a defense gives you an eight-man front or stunts or blitzes, the guys know how their assignment changes, and they make the changes immediately as the play is evolving on the field. That's why they are so sound play after play."

But the linemen also function within a strange code of conduct formulated by Gibbs, who boycotts the media. In both Denver and Atlanta, usually only one lineman gives interviews. Otherwise, an internal kangaroo court fines linemen even for having their name mentioned in stories. "It's all part of what you learn as a young lineman," Broncos right tackle George Foster says. "There is a standard on and off the field, and you are expected to live up to it. Otherwise, you don't last." Even current line coaches Rick Dennison in Denver and Jeff Jagodzinski in Atlanta buy into the silence. Jagodzinski, in his first season as line coach, still is learning from Gibbs. But Dennison, who has a masters in civil engineering, has excelled since replacing Gibbs. "I don't think I have been with a coach as bright as he is," Shanahan says.

What also hasn't changed is the difficulty of neutralizing the Bronco Scheme. Familiarity helps. Division rival Tampa plays the Falcons twice a season and has found that its own quickness has created problems for Atlanta's offense. But for teams such as the Jaguars, who have played Denver the past two seasons, preparation for the scheme is more taxing. "What the scheme does," says Jaguars defensive coordinator Mike Smith, "is force you to be solid in gap integrity. They want to get two of their guys in the gap, and we can't let them do that or it opens up a run lane. They want to push you sideways, by the hole. So you have to be disciplined and have your color uniform in each gap. Then they give you all the window dressing with different formations and motion and all, and you have to cut through that, too."

If you have a defensive front such as Jacksonville's, which is strong and athletic enough to push upfield and cut into the lateral flow, suddenly the picket fence breaks. You don't want gap penetrators but rather gap maintainers who can shove the Bronco Scheme linemen backward. Still, so far this season, no team has held Atlanta under 115 yards rushing, and its average per game is 10.8 yards higher than last year's club record. Since two sub-100-yard rushing games to open the schedule, the Broncos have gained no fewer than 121 yards, and there is a chance Anderson and Tatum Bell might become the first backs under Shanahan to each gain 1,000 in the same season.

"You may not win championships because you run the ball well," says Shanahan, owner of two Super Bowl rings, "but it certainly gives you a better chance than if you can't."

Senior writer Paul Attner covers the NFL for Sporting News. E-mail him at attner@sportingnews.com.
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on December 29, 2013, 10:52:19 PM
In Alex Gibbs' 12 year span with the Broncos & Falcons, he compiled these INCREDIBLE feats (with 2 teams, & 9 different Running Backs):

1.  11 of those 12 seasons he was in the top 3 rushing teams in NFL.
2.  8 of those 12 years he was #1 in the NFL team in rushing.
3.  7 of those 12 years he led the NFL in "BIG PLAY RUNS" (runs of 20+ yards).
4.  11 of those 12 seasons he led the NFL in "FEWEST NEGATIVES" (runs of less than 2 yards).

This is what PROPERLY TAUGHT "Zone blocking" can do for you!
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on December 30, 2013, 09:19:02 AM
In Alex Gibbs' 12 year span with the Broncos & Falcons, he compiled these INCREDIBLE feats (with 2 teams, & 9 different Running Backs):

1.  11 of those 12 seasons he was in the top 3 rushing teams in NFL.
2.  8 of those 12 years he was #1 in the NFL team in rushing.
3.  7 of those 12 years he led the NFL in "BIG PLAY RUNS" (runs of 20+ yards).
4.  11 of those 12 seasons he led the NFL in "FEWEST NEGATIVES" (runs of less than 2 yards).

This is what PROPERLY TAUGHT "Zone blocking" can do for you!


See Alex Gibbs OZ cutups:
Outside Zone Cut-Ups terrell davis alex gibbs (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KNa3gZfQfH0#)
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Vince148 on December 30, 2013, 09:20:16 AM

No - same drills - different cut.  We do VERY LITTLE INDIVIDUAL DRILLS, because football is a TEAM game, & the RB needs to see the "BIG PICTURE" (a lot of bodies flying all around), THUS - we primarily do the following drills where (depending on WHAT he sees & where he goes) he MIGHT "CRAM THE AIMING POINT", "jump cut", OR "roll-back":
If you don't do individual drills, how do you teach the steps, punch, etc. to the linemen?
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on December 30, 2013, 09:32:37 AM
If you don't do individual drills, how do you teach the steps, punch, etc. to the linemen?


Your quote was in reference to my statement that we do "very few" individual RB READ DRILLS.  He needs to be behind his line & see the defense ("big picture").

NOTE:  I posted ALL THE DETAILS of the ZONE PLAYS if you look on dumcoach under "OFFENSE: SCHEMES" ("PRO-STYLE FOOTBALL") & the topics are "OUTSIDE ZONE CLINIC", AND, "INSIDE ZONE CLINIC"!

I did not SAY we didn't do "individual" (that is where you BEGIN) but zone blocking needs to be done more in combination with a teammate.  We do a progression of INDIVIDUAL; SMALL GROUP; LARGE GROUP; & TEAM.  You need to PHONE if it isn't clear, BECAUSE it is too hard to explain a "system" typing (I never TOOK typing).  804-716-7038 (Virginia).

DRILLING ZONE BLOCKING ("cut & pasted" from my notebook):


1. INDIVIDUAL: (bags OR live)  “1 vs. 1”

A) INSIDE ZONE

----1. Drive Block DLM

----2. Drive Block LBer

B) OUTSIDE ZONE

----1. Reach Block DLM

----2. Reach Block LBer

************************************************************************


2. SMAll GROUP: (INSIDE & OUTSIDE ZONE TECHNIQUES - vs. bags OR live)

A) "2 vs. 2" (uncovered man & covered man work vs. a ILer & DLM).

-----1. DLM widens & LBer steps inside of DLM

-----2. DML pinches inside & LBer scrapes outside

-----3. DLM anchors on covered man & LBer moves behind DLM (reading the RB)

************************************************************************


3. LARGE GROUP: (LIVE)

A) "7 ON 5" (Live - NO bags)


----------M
-----E--T---T--E
-----O-O-C-O-O
----------Q

----------R

4-3 = Gives the Center a chance to zone with Guards (on zone TO callside)



---------B----B
------E----N----E
------O-O-C-O-O
-----------Q

-----------R

3-4 Gives the Guards a chance to zone with Tackles (on zone TO callside) or Center (on zone AWAY callside)


B) "9 on 7" (Live - no bags)


-----------W---M----S
--------E-----T---T----E
--------O-O-O-C-O-O-O
----------------Q

----------------R

4-3 = Gives the Tackles a chance to zone with the TE's (on zone TO callside), or the Guards (on zone AWAY callside)


NOTE: The "7 on 5" & "9 on 7" should be your best ("O") vs. best ("D"). Full speed with no tackling the RB. Benefits of these:

1. COMPETITIVE DRILLS VS. DEFENSE;
2. BLOCKING TECHNIQUES VS. BLOCK REACTIONS;
3.  RB GETS HIS "READS"
4. TEACHES TOUGHNESS!!!!!


************************************************************************


4.  TEAM (11 vs. 11)


************************************************************************


NOTE:  I posted ALL THE DETAILS if you look on dumcoach under ("OFFENSE: SCHEMES") "PRO-STYLE FOOTBALL" & the topics are "OUTSIDE ZONE CLINIC", AND, "INSIDE ZONE CLINIC"!
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on December 30, 2013, 12:25:59 PM
This ATTACHMENT shows just how VERY SIMPLE all of my above post really IS ("boiled down"):
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Dusty Ol Fart on December 30, 2013, 10:12:19 PM

See Alex Gibbs OZ cutups:
Outside Zone Cut-Ups terrell davis alex gibbs (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KNa3gZfQfH0#)

Folks:

This video says it all about OZ.  Were there some misses? yup!  But note what Coach Gibbs said.  READ Said X we do ex and "We live with it!!"  Do you see where the inside cut might have been better?  See aforementioned.

Zone Blocking is DYNAMIC!!  A lot of these Cut Ups were Big on Big blocks.  Unless, as Coach Gibbs said, you dictate a block then work On, Playside, Over (to put it in Rule Blocking vernacular).   Note where Gibbs said "I ripped the Backs Nuts."  Why?  Because he made the line look stupid!! 

Note where Gibbs says "The cut occurred 4 yards outside the hash mark"...Important because the DYNAMICS of the play opened the seam there.

Also note where the play went outside all the way,  That's where the one cut and done is of the utmost importance.  Dont allow your RB's to string the play to the sideline.  Read the Read, right or wrong, and get up field!!!  NEVER allow the Sideline to make the tackle!! 

I noted at least once where Gibbs was going to read the Guards Ass for allowing the defender to push him onto the backfield and the Guard had the angle. Those are the things we look for as an OL coach in Zone.

Did the player on the LOS?  Did he allow penetration?  Did the get up field to the second level and seal? 

Note he chastised a few for CRAPPY Cut Blocks.  As I have said numerous times and Gibb's agrees, being able to execute a Good Cut block requires moving your feet to get ahead of the defender and into his play side thigh!!  NOT diving at the back of their legs or balling up at their feet.  Too easy to injure someone.

Hence you now understand my disdain for the cut block at the Youth Level. Folks dont teach it right and even the Pro's have issues executing them properly. 

Throw a rock at me guys but, if you kid can move fast enough at the Youth Level to Cut, He can Scoop the guy in the PS Gap or over him.  Let the HS and College Coaches get them Cutting.  If the kid cant move fast enough you have to rethink your choice of Linemen!!  Its that damned simple! 

Good Stuff thanks Bill!!   

 ;)
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on January 04, 2014, 02:21:10 PM
When adjacent blockers are able to get a "fit" on the DLM, the ATTACHED shows what it looks like:
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on January 14, 2014, 11:10:37 AM
Alex Gibbs teaches a "REACH" block on the play-side of the OZ.  Many people mistakenly believe that means to HOOK the defender to the inside.  The PURPOSE of the "REACH" block is to STRETCH the defender, thus giving the RB a "clean read".  The key coaching points are ATTACHED, but BASICALLY you try to keep the face in the outside arm pit (with hands INSIDE the defender's hands) & just take him where he WANTS to go (PREFERABLY vertically OR laterally).

This applies all the way from a Center reaching a Nose, to a TE reaching a 9 TECH DE.  SEE ATTACHMENT:
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on January 14, 2014, 09:09:20 PM
Excellent articles on INSIDE ZONE & OUTSIDE ZONES (ATTACHED):
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on January 18, 2014, 12:52:31 PM
As we all know - Florida St won the National Championship.  Their Line Coach - Rick Trickett has a great book on their Run & Pass Blocking, & Game Strategy.

The following is quoted verbatim from that book = INTRODUCTION page XI:  "I spoke with Alex Gibbs of the Denver Broncos.  I had been following his coaching style, and his full-zone blocking schemes.  Coach Gibbs gave me valuable information that I continue to use.   When you are going to take something from someone else and use it, I don't believe in putting your own mark on it right away.  In other words, we did exactly what the Denver Broncos were doing, and we were successful".

****************************************************************************************

I would like to ADD to what Rick Trickett says by mentioning the following:  I feel there is danger in looking for TOO MANY ways to zone block (too much "conflicting info").  Pick ONE way & stick to it!  We have (since 1981) STUCK with the Joe Bugel/Alex Gibbs method (which is identical).  Coaches Bugel & A. Gibbs overlapped at Ohio St (1974-1975) and Alex Gibbs considered Jor Bugel a mentor.  Joe Bugel majored in the Inside Zone, where Alex Gibbs refined the Outside Zone.  It is THEIR METHOD that I used 100%!
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Jburk on January 18, 2014, 01:57:40 PM
As we all know - Florida St won the National Championship.  Their Line Coach - Rick Trickett has a great book on their Run & Pass Blocking, & Game Strategy.

The following is quoted verbatim from that book = INTRODUCTION page XI:  "I spoke with Alex Gibbs of the Denver Broncos.  I had been following his coaching style, and his full-zone blocking schemes.  Coach Gibbs gave me valuable information that I continue to use.   When you are going to take something from someone else and use it, I don't believe in putting your own mark on it right away.  In other words, we did exactly what the Denver Broncos were doing, and we were successful".

****************************************************************************************

I would like to ADD to what Rick Trickett says by mentioning the following:  I feel there is danger in looking for TOO MANY ways to zone block (too much "conflicting info").  Pick ONE way & stick to it!  We have (since 1981) STUCK with the Joe Bugel/Alex Gibbs method (which is identical).  Coaches Bugel & A. Gibbs overlapped at Ohio St (1974-=1975) and Alex Gibbs considered Jor Bugel a mentor.  Joe Bugel majored in the Inside Zone, where Alex Gibbs refined the Outside Zone.  It is THEIR METHOD that I used 100%!

I've been reading through that book this past week; I'm very impressed at how he presents the information. As an author, he presents A LOT of information in an easily digested format. The photos and diagrams that acompany the information are super helpful. Thanks for recommending this book to me, coach.

Also, I would agree with you on teaching zone blocking one way and sticking to it. Through my own personal trial and error, I've found the counting method to be the best FOR ME. Going forward, I don't think I'll ever teach it another way. As an added bunus, the counting method was a very easy carry over to our BOB pass pro. Unless we were running a gap scheme, our kids were always counting out the defense. That continuity and simplicity appealed to me greatly.
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: morris on January 18, 2014, 04:08:43 PM
I talked to Coach Mountjoy yesterday and we will be following the Trickett book to the letter.  In fact I am going to get the digital copy also because it has video clips in it and use my ipad to show things in practice at times.  We start spring at the end of feb till the end of May.  Right now we are going to rep the crap out of IZ/OZ.  Depending on how we do we'll start repping power and counter.  I've run power and counter before so I feel I can wait till we come back during the summer to add that if I don't feel like we are progressing well enough with IZ/OZ
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on January 18, 2014, 04:57:59 PM
I talked to Coach Mountjoy yesterday and we will be following the Trickett book to the letter.  In fact I am going to get the digital copy also because it has video clips in it and use my ipad to show things in practice at times.  We start spring at the end of feb till the end of May.  Right now we are going to rep the crap out of IZ/OZ.  Depending on how we do we'll start repping power and counter.  I've run power and counter before so I feel I can wait till we come back during the summer to add that if I don't feel like we are progressing well enough with IZ/OZ


In OUR formations if you can only get to ONE (Counter or Power) = make it the COUNTER because it can be run BOTH ways without MOTION. 
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: morris on January 18, 2014, 05:13:19 PM
I remember that bit of information well.  I also like the idea of boot off of counter better than other actions and like you said Counter it the Counter to IZ.  I'm excited about this spring and new season.  I'm hoping to be able to put up film of some of our drills and such to get feedback
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Vince148 on January 18, 2014, 05:19:52 PM
In fact I am going to get the digital copy also because it has video clips in it and use my ipad to show things in practice at times.
I purchased the ebook for the Nook through B&N. It does not appear that there are any video links. Links just seem go to the pictures in the book. Maybe it's different with the Kindle edition.
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on January 20, 2014, 11:08:58 AM
In yesterday's playoff wins, BOTH the Broncos (with A Gibbs on staff as "adviser"), & the Seahawks (with A Gibbs DISCIPLE Pat Ruel coaching O-Line) FEATURED the INSIDE ZONE!
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on January 22, 2014, 10:20:37 AM
Important thinking in the Inside & Outside Zone series (ATTACHED):
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Pearls of Wisdom on January 26, 2014, 09:49:52 PM
Alex Gibbs returns to the Broncos as a consultant
Posted by Josh Alper on May 12, 2013


The Broncos are looking to their past for some help with their offensive future.

Alex Gibbs was the offensive line coach who was in Denver when the Broncos won two Super Bowls with John Elway a one-cut, zone-blocking scheme in the running game and he has returned as a consultant to the team that Elway now runs. Gibbs, who coached the Denver blockers from 1995-2003, is expected to work with offensive line coach Dave Magazu throughout the offseason and help out in the regular season as well.

“He’ll be a good resource,” Broncos coach John Fox said, via Mike Klis of the Denver Post. “I know from competing against (Gibbs) over the years that he can help us out.”

In addition to Gibbs, who coached in Atlanta, Houston and Seattle after leaving Denver, the Broncos also brought in zone-blocking proponent Greg Knapp as quarterbacks coach this offseason so you’d expect to see a bit more of it in the team’s offensive attack this season. How much is unclear, as is whether or not the Broncos offensive linemen will reinstitute Gibbs’ policy of players from the unit not speaking to the media.
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Test Account on January 22, 2018, 08:54:52 AM
Groundswell
Published Wednesday, Dec 7, 2005 at 2:32 pm EST
Paul Attner Sporting News


It is the winter after his first season as Broncos coach and Mike Shanahan is troubled. His running game is not as dominant as he would like, with too many negative plays. And he's concerned that the finesse aspects of his West Coast offense are not projecting the image he desires for his team. So he and Alex Gibbs, his offensive line coach and friend, devise something uniquely their own -- a curiously different run approach that calls for zone blocking built on a foundation of toughness and physicality.

Ten years later, the brilliance of their creation is at its peak. The running scheme born from their talented minds drives the NFL's two top rushing teams. The Broncos and Falcons are grinding toward franchise-record running seasons, their playoff desires grounded firmly in the intricacies of the league's most devilish and intriguing method of line blocking.

For the Falcons, their success on the ground follows a 2004 season in which Gibbs, in his first and only year as their full-time line coach, transformed Atlanta's running game from mediocre to No. 1 in the league. It's a status the team has maintained this season with a 177.8 yards-per-game average that projects as the NFL's highest in 35 years. For the Broncos, their running prowess offers them a potential ball control solution to overcoming the Colts in January.

The effectiveness of this rushing scheme is fascinating, considering all the analysis it has endured by the best defensive minds the league could offer. These clubs have the NFL's two smallest lines -- both average less than 300 pounds -- and neither has a player atop the rushing standings. Yet Atlanta has gained 200 or more yards in five games, and Denver's 162.7-yard average projects to the highest of the 11-year Shanahan era, during which the Broncos have the most running yards of any NFL franchise.

This season, the two teams also are 1-2 in two important and revealing categories: yards per carry (each averages more than 5.0) and lowest percentage of attempts resulting in lost yards.

Let's embark on an exploration to uncover the secrets behind this Bronco Scheme, an approach that doesn't pull guards and tackles, doesn't employ the counter trey and doesn't feature many traps or draws yet is so amazingly successful.

The first time Falcons running back Warrick Dunn tries to be creative by making a couple of moves before cutting into a hole, he hears the voice of Gibbs. "One cut downhill ... one cut downhill," Gibbs screams. It was Dunn's introduction last season to the demanding details of the Bronco Scheme. "There is just one way to do everything they ask," he says. "Or you don't play."

Denver and Atlanta don't have many running plays. The Broncos, for example, might bring no more than 12 into a game. But the success of the scheme is not tied to quantity; it excels because of the ability of the offense to execute with precision the exacting requirements of each of these few plays. Behind all of it has been the bellowing of Gibbs, first in Denver and now in Atlanta, where he serves this season as a consultant who spends a few days each week with the team. This 5-7 bundle of passion, vulgarity and brilliance -- his players joke he is Napoleon on speed -- mixes demeaning authoritarianism and an incredible grasp of the concepts into success. An eccentric football genius with a doctorate in education, he crashed and burned in Denver in 2000, finally needing psychiatric help and medication.

Yet Gibbs became Jim Mora's most important hire as a rookie head coach in 2004. No NFL rushing method could make better use of Michael Vick's talents, considering how the Bronco Scheme, with its focus on inside runs, functions best with the bona fide outside threat of quarterback bootlegs.

"To make their system complete, you need to fear the quarterback running that boot to your weak side," Bucs linebackers coach Joe Barry says. "With Atlanta, you have a freaking rocket ship coming out of there at quarterback. The whole scheme is a bitch to defend. Both teams don't do a lot. So no matter what the defense does, they are able to practice against it because they aren't bogging down their players with too many runs." It's what Redskins defensive line coach Greg Blache calls the "Colonel Sanders" philosophy: "They do one thing well; they do chicken right." But having Vick gives the Falcons the edge over Denver in rushing. He has 470 yards this season after gaining 902 yards -- the third most by a quarterback in NFL history -- in 2004.

Yet the Bronco Scheme doesn't need a Vick to excel. Shanahan has produced five different 1,000-yard rushers -- most of whom have been low-round draft choices -- including 1995 sixth-round pick Terrell Davis, who gained 2,008 yards in 1998. Ron Dayne, a flop with the Giants, set up the winning field goal against Dallas on Thanksgiving with a 55-yard overtime run. "He is a 1,000-yard rusher in our system as a starter," says Shanahan matter-of-factly. Oh, yes, Dayne is a third-string back. In Atlanta, Dunn, who rushed for 1,106 yards last season, already has accumulated 1,174 this fall, a career high for the ninth-year veteran.

So it's the system, not the backs, right? Not really. The Broncos never sign a jitterbug back whose instincts push him toward multiple fakes and ad-lib scrambles. Dunn had those tendencies pre-Gibbs; to function in the system, he has transformed himself. He now is a one-cut runner whose goal on every carry is to avoid negative yards. So if there is no hole, he plows ahead anyway. "We're taught to gain at least a blade of grass on every attempt," says Falcons fullback Fred McCrary. If you are indecisive and unwilling to be tough and run downhill, you won't run for these teams.

Still, it is what happens up front, among the athletic, quick and, for the NFL, small linemen that makes the Bronco Scheme different and so effective. To uncover why, we need to go to the videotape.

On the huge screen is a football choreography contrary to anything you'd anticipate about this most muscular of sports. In lock step, linemen move:

shoulders square, in perfect balance, sliding effortlessly down the scrimmage line, nearly 1,500 pounds of nimbleness -- a dance of intricacy and precision. These images, on this large screen within the headquarters of NFL Films, display the foundation of all that has been dominant about the Bronco Scheme. Before T.J. Duckett or Mike Anderson can gain a yard, their linemen must first become Baryshnikovs in shoulder pads, drilled to work in unison, geared to frustrate defenders unable to crack the formidable barrier presented by this picket fence in motion.

Several years ago, Denver's linemen had another term to describe their meticulousness.

Trained seals.

Here on the screen, the current Broncos linemen are working against the Redskins' defense. The usual NFL approach to run blocking is macho-oriented. You take on opponents man-to-man, firing straight into them alone or in tandem with a teammate, with the goal to knock them up the field, away from the line and apart from each other. The ultimate triumph of this mentality is the pancake block -- sending the defender onto his derriere. But the Bronco Scheme is based on zone blocking, in which you worry about protecting an area and the defenders who intrude into it. The movement is lateral, not straight ahead. The pivotal word here is stretch -- the linemen want to stretch the field and force the defense to run laterally with them. The more it stretches, the more creases open for the running back.

On virtually every stretch play, you will see multiple double-teams by the linemen -- what they call a "hat and one-half" on each down defender. The heads of the linemen are always up; they are constantly looking, moving. Once the double-teamed defender is under control, one of the Broncos' linemen will split away seamlessly and move to the next zone, the next opponent, lending help to another teammate. Or he will scurry to the next level to hunt down linebackers and safeties. On the backside, away from the direction of the running back, the linemen frequently use cut blocks -- blocks aimed at the thighs and rolled to the feet -- to knock down defenders and limit pursuit. It is a controversial block -- defensive players hate it because it attacks their legs -- but it is legal and has a purpose.

"You knock down a 330-pound nose tackle for three quarters and he is really tired in the fourth," says FOX and Sporting News analyst Brian Baldinger, a former NFL lineman and our videotape guide on this day. "So all of a sudden he is too fatigued to make the same tackle he made in the first half. And that

3-yard run becomes a 30-yarder." So the Bronco Scheme preaches patience. "It is a philosophy," says Mora. "You have to stay with the run and not abandon it. You have to have the mentality that the big plays will happen, that the big holes will be there." On third-and-5 or -6, when most teams pass, these two clubs just as often run, frequently from three-receiver sets. The Falcons average almost 35 carries a game, the Broncos 33. The rest of the league averages 27.

It is so maddening and methodical, this unrelenting stretch-the-field approach. "They block everything so it looks like an outside run, but it's not," says Dolphins middle linebacker Zach Thomas. "They're not trying to get to the edge; they are trying to run between the tackles. But they're moving the line sideways and waiting for you to commit. It's tough because everything you're taught to do on an outside run is to attack, and you have to fight your instincts." Because if a defender attacks, that's when he's nudged out of the way and the runner cuts into the resulting hole. Or, if the defense really overpursues, he cuts dramatically, in back of everyone. And that's when the scheme's emphasis on cutting down backside pursuit and sending linemen upfield to help receivers block linebackers and defensive backs leads to long gains.

"If we are running it well, you can hear defensive guys muttering to themselves in the fourth quarter," Falcons right guard Kynan Forney says. "They are tired, they don't want to tackle anymore. Basically, they lose life; you can feel it." To constantly move sideways and stay in front of defenders requires players with quickness and athleticism. Both franchises have found these linemen mostly in the lower rounds; five of the 10 starters were picked after the fourth round, and another, Denver left tackle Matt Lepsis, was an undrafted college tight end. But the Bronco Scheme allows someone such as Denver center Tom Nalen (6-3, 286) to become a dominant player, a potential Hall of Famer.

"They play with a great awareness," Baldinger says. "They don't block guys who have no chance of making a play. And they give a defense so much to think about: the stretch, the cutback, the bootleg, the reverse. It slows defenses down, makes them have to play perfect on every snap."

It also is why Shanahan was eager to bring in Jake Plummer to replace slow-footed Brian Griese at quarterback two years ago. With Griese, the bootleg part of the scheme disappeared; with Plummer, it has returned with a flourish.

"It takes smart people to play this system," former Broncos lineman David Diaz-Infante says. "The guys are so good at knowing who to block. If a defense gives you an eight-man front or stunts or blitzes, the guys know how their assignment changes, and they make the changes immediately as the play is evolving on the field. That's why they are so sound play after play."

But the linemen also function within a strange code of conduct formulated by Gibbs, who boycotts the media. In both Denver and Atlanta, usually only one lineman gives interviews. Otherwise, an internal kangaroo court fines linemen even for having their name mentioned in stories. "It's all part of what you learn as a young lineman," Broncos right tackle George Foster says. "There is a standard on and off the field, and you are expected to live up to it. Otherwise, you don't last." Even current line coaches Rick Dennison in Denver and Jeff Jagodzinski in Atlanta buy into the silence. Jagodzinski, in his first season as line coach, still is learning from Gibbs. But Dennison, who has a masters in civil engineering, has excelled since replacing Gibbs. "I don't think I have been with a coach as bright as he is," Shanahan says.

What also hasn't changed is the difficulty of neutralizing the Bronco Scheme. Familiarity helps. Division rival Tampa plays the Falcons twice a season and has found that its own quickness has created problems for Atlanta's offense. But for teams such as the Jaguars, who have played Denver the past two seasons, preparation for the scheme is more taxing. "What the scheme does," says Jaguars defensive coordinator Mike Smith, "is force you to be solid in gap integrity. They want to get two of their guys in the gap, and we can't let them do that or it opens up a run lane. They want to push you sideways, by the hole. So you have to be disciplined and have your color uniform in each gap. Then they give you all the window dressing with different formations and motion and all, and you have to cut through that, too."

If you have a defensive front such as Jacksonville's, which is strong and athletic enough to push upfield and cut into the lateral flow, suddenly the picket fence breaks. You don't want gap penetrators but rather gap maintainers who can shove the Bronco Scheme linemen backward. Still, so far this season, no team has held Atlanta under 115 yards rushing, and its average per game is 10.8 yards higher than last year's club record. Since two sub-100-yard rushing games to open the schedule, the Broncos have gained no fewer than 121 yards, and there is a chance Anderson and Tatum Bell might become the first backs under Shanahan to each gain 1,000 in the same season.

"You may not win championships because you run the ball well," says Shanahan, owner of two Super Bowl rings, "but it certainly gives you a better chance than if you can't."

Senior writer Paul Attner covers the NFL for Sporting News. E-mail him at attner@sportingnews.com.
sorry I am using this as way to come back.
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: ZACH on January 24, 2018, 11:24:17 AM
Jeff Stoutland oline coach for the eagles and formally alabama and miami spoke recently and basically reaffirmed the count and one on one blocking scheme.

If you can find more from Stoutland youde be very happy you did.
Title: Re: ALEX GIBBS ZONE BLOCKING
Post by: Coach Correa on January 24, 2018, 02:08:58 PM
sorry I am using this as way to come back.
Interesting article good find .