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General => General Discussion => Practice / Player Evaluations / Pre-Game => Topic started by: Vince148 on January 02, 2018, 11:17:15 AM

Title: What is your idea of conditioning?
Post by: Vince148 on January 02, 2018, 11:17:15 AM
I was going through some of DP's stuff over the weekend. I was actually looking for information about the Circle of Death. All the links in the various threads here for Jack are taking me to a dead site. I did incorporate it early in my coaching career, but got away from it later. So, if anyone has that info, I'd appreciate it.

Anyway, going through DP's slides got me thinking about what actually is "conditioning"? I recall on one of his slides about his first two days, he takes the first hour of the first practice to do his "tryouts". The second hour is "conditioning". I'm curious what that means to different coaches. If it's lots of "running", that's certainly not me. I spend most of my first couple of practices teaching blocking and tackling technique. The only "conditioning" that I do is reserved for the last 10-15 minutes. The last couple of years, I've been using my "Ladder from Hell". You start with 10 burpees, 10 pushups, 10 sit-ups, and a 5-10-5. Then you progress to 9, then 8...and finally to 1. It's always 1 5-10-5. It definitely is a mental toughness drill. Give them ample rest between ladders. However, I only used it for the first 2-3 practices. But that is pretty much it in regards to conditioning. Maybe I'll change it to "Ladder of Death" to go with the "Circle of Death".                                   
Title: Re: What is your idea of conditioning?
Post by: ZACH on January 02, 2018, 11:26:04 AM
Conditioning is the ability  of recovery vs stress.

Sport specific conditioning is just putting game stressors in practice conditions.

You build the rate of an athletes recovery by the stress you put on it...

All year we have hard,  moderate, and light days. Usually in that order. During aug thats 2 hard days a week if we don't have a scrimmage.

Too many hard days in a row will set you backwards and people will start to get injured.

We dont run to condition... we have sled sessions, perfect plays sets, multiple min drills.  Multiple special steams drills, pursuit to tackle.

I feel like most coaches turn there kids into burpess queens or track stars which have no relation to the sport and their kids get tired either way and so goes the woes of uneducated coaches
Title: Re: What is your idea of conditioning?
Post by: gumby_in_co on January 02, 2018, 12:07:42 PM
I've already described our plyo routine. That's part of the conditioning and starts from Day 1.

Early in each season, we run every player through our route tree. 5 receiver positions, 2 player QBs and 3 coaches all throwing balls. They end up running intervals for 30 minutes, but are oblivious to the fact that they are running.

This is all to get the physically prepared for the grind of football.

However, an important component is the mental toughness aspect. That's where Jack's Enduro comes in. Mahonz has a similar drill that involves hill runs and is done roughly once a week early in the season. We didn't do it with our last group in the last 2 seasons, though.

It's all about overcoming the mental aspects of pain, fatigue and discomfort. My little twist to it is the "us against the world" aspect. I try to take the opportunity to teach the kids to band together to overcome a common enemy. In this case, the enemy happens to be Mahonz.  ;D Sort of a "Don't give the prick the satisfaction of seeing you quit. Make eye contact with a teammate and let him fill your emotional gas tank."

Title: Re: What is your idea of conditioning?
Post by: mahonz on January 02, 2018, 03:02:12 PM
I've already described our plyo routine. That's part of the conditioning and starts from Day 1.

Early in each season, we run every player through our route tree. 5 receiver positions, 2 player QBs and 3 coaches all throwing balls. They end up running intervals for 30 minutes, but are oblivious to the fact that they are running.

This is all to get the physically prepared for the grind of football.

However, an important component is the mental toughness aspect. That's where Jack's Enduro comes in. Mahonz has a similar drill that involves hill runs and is done roughly once a week early in the season. We didn't do it with our last group in the last 2 seasons, though.

It's all about overcoming the mental aspects of pain, fatigue and discomfort. My little twist to it is the "us against the world" aspect. I try to take the opportunity to teach the kids to band together to overcome a common enemy. In this case, the enemy happens to be Mahonz.  ;D Sort of a "Don't give the prick the satisfaction of seeing you quit. Make eye contact with a teammate and let him fill your emotional gas tank."

We lost our hill when they moved us to Drake.  :(
Title: Re: What is your idea of conditioning?
Post by: chucknduck on January 02, 2018, 03:21:35 PM
I won't dedicate any practice time to conditioning.  We just practice at a very fast pace.  The conditioning just happens on its own.

Now, as an AC, I don't have full control. At the high school that I last coached I would have our team completely gassed after a screen period and our two minute drill.  Practice should've been done right there.  The head guy would make them line up on the sideline and run back and forth across the field for a good twenty minutes.  Sometimes he'd eliminate our two minute drill so we could get our running in.
Half the team would show up with their ankles taped due to shin splints.  He'd have them running just as much the next day.
I argued with him and our line coach all the time.  Guys would get dizzy or be limping and I'd pull them out.  The line coach said I was babying them.
I got the hell out of there before the season started.  So did a lot of players.

Title: Re: What is your idea of conditioning?
Post by: Bob Goodman on January 02, 2018, 06:26:32 PM
I consider conditioning to be bldg. long-term endurance.  Like a printed program I was handed when I was playing rugby, to be done over the summer between spring & fall season.  I think it took a minimum of 7 weeks, graded sprints, to be done after a distance run, but I never did the distance run.  You were to judge progress by your ability to keep your pulse under a certain figure.

I would never do that sort of thing with kids I coach in football.  For one thing, I don't think it'd work unless you had that amount of time before pre-season began, nor would I expect kids to do it 5-6 days/week over that time as prescribed.  For another, I don't think children need or benefit from that kind of conditioning for football.  I wrote last season about how I never saw them breathing hard in games the way they did from the sprints our coaches made them do, even though we had a roster of only 15.  If they were playing rugby, they'd have more need of it.  Some kids actually love doing the sprints if you make races out of them, but others are just bored or bothered by them, and we're here to play football, not run track.

If I could have kids work on anything truly off-season, it'd probably be weight lifting, & for those who groove to that, fine, but even there I think a little technique (which you can coach) or size (which you can't) beats a lot of strength.  For safety's sake, though, I would like them to strengthen the muscles that dorsiflex the neck, and considering that the time they'll have for that will probably be at home (no partners, no equipment), I'd expect that to be accomplished by back bridges.
Title: Re: What is your idea of conditioning?
Post by: CoachDP on January 02, 2018, 08:05:58 PM
I was going through some of DP's stuff over the weekend. I was actually looking for information about the Circle of Death.

--Vince, if you're interested in this drill, I'd suggest you give me a call, as there are so many ways to run it incorrectly.


I recall on one of his slides about his first two days, he takes the first hour of the first practice to do his "tryouts". The second hour is "conditioning".

--Actually, it's the first three weeks.  Hour 1 (Week 1) was position try-outs where everyone throws, catches, kicks, punts, deep-snaps and gets timed in sprints.  Hour 2 was conditioning: Dynamics, Frog Hops, Bunny Hops, Crab Walks, Lame Dogs, Backwards Bear Crawls, Squatting Backwards Hops, Bellies, Circle of Death, and so on.  Hour 1 (Week 2) was Position Drills.  Hour 1 (Week 3) was Scheme Install.

We learned that the more we demanded of our players (physically and mentally), the more they gave us.  The more they learned to play through drills that required  long-term, high intensity effort, the more they learned to consistently play that way.  We observed that in many other practices, coaches weren't demanding practices that required great effort, but then wanted great effort from their players on game day.  In our approach, our players learned that the only way to play was through giving great effort.  We didn't have to ask for it on game day.  It was the only way they had learned from us to play.

--Dave


                                   
Title: Re: What is your idea of conditioning?
Post by: PSLCOACHROB on January 03, 2018, 11:55:59 AM
Conditioning is the ability  of recovery vs stress.

Sport specific conditioning is just putting game stressors in practice conditions.

You build the rate of an athletes recovery by the stress you put on it...

All year we have hard,  moderate, and light days. Usually in that order. During aug thats 2 hard days a week if we don't have a scrimmage.

Too many hard days in a row will set you backwards and people will start to get injured.

We dont run to condition... we have sled sessions, perfect plays sets, multiple min drills.  Multiple special steams drills, pursuit to tackle.

I feel like most coaches turn there kids into burpess queens or track stars which have no relation to the sport and their kids get tired either way and so goes the woes of uneducated coaches
Exactly, conditioning should mimic the sport you are playing. High intensity football drills with a high speed practice is all we ever needed. We ran hurry up 100% of the time and the other teams were always gassed long before we were even though I know many of them ran sprints every day.
Title: Re: What is your idea of conditioning?
Post by: CoachDP on January 03, 2018, 12:24:08 PM
I know many of them ran sprints every day.

Running sprints is just a waste of time.  Coaches who make their kids "take a lap" after warm-ups inevitably end up yelling, "Don't be last!" as they wait for Little Billy and Fat Freddy.  That's often followed with, "You better run!"  (Or else, what?  You're going to make him run [I mean, walk] again?)

--Dave
Title: Re: What is your idea of conditioning?
Post by: PSLCOACHROB on January 03, 2018, 01:23:58 PM
Running sprints is just a waste of time.  Coaches who make their kids "take a lap" after warm-ups inevitably end up yelling, "Don't be last!" as they wait for Little Billy and Fat Freddy.  That's often followed with, "You better run!"  (Or else, what?  You're going to make him run [I mean, walk] again?)

--Dave
Coaches talk to me about how we did things. One of the first things I talk to them is about conditioning and the first part of that is always running laps. I try to stress the importance of conditioning for football and not track or cross country. Inevitably, you watch them practice after they ask for advice and help and there the kids are running a lap to start practice and running sprints at the end. Even worse, as pointed out above, cancelling specials or some other important thing to do sprints. I never understood the guys who want advice and help and all they really want is the magic offense and defense. Go ask somebody else. We just ran super simple stuff that everybody else runs. We just ran it better because we practiced better. Few people outside of this website get that.
Title: Re: What is your idea of conditioning?
Post by: Seabass on January 03, 2018, 01:30:22 PM
Coaches talk to me about how we did things. One of the first things I talk to them is about conditioning and the first part of that is always running laps. I try to stress the importance of conditioning for football and not track or cross country. Inevitably, you watch them practice after they ask for advice and help and there the kids are running a lap to start practice and running sprints at the end. Even worse, as pointed out above, cancelling specials or some other important thing to do sprints. I never understood the guys who want advice and help and all they really want is the magic offense and defense. Go ask somebody else. We just ran super simple stuff that everybody else runs. We just ran it better because we practiced better. Few people outside of this website get that.

My dad calls those people "ASKHOLE'S"..... the guy who always asks for advice but never takes it.
Title: Re: What is your idea of conditioning?
Post by: Vince148 on January 03, 2018, 02:16:48 PM
I've already described our plyo routine. That's part of the conditioning and starts from Day 1.

Early in each season, we run every player through our route tree. 5 receiver positions, 2 player QBs and 3 coaches all throwing balls. They end up running intervals for 30 minutes, but are oblivious to the fact that they are running.

This is all to get the physically prepared for the grind of football.

However, an important component is the mental toughness aspect. That's where Jack's Enduro comes in. Mahonz has a similar drill that involves hill runs and is done roughly once a week early in the season. We didn't do it with our last group in the last 2 seasons, though.

It's all about overcoming the mental aspects of pain, fatigue and discomfort. My little twist to it is the "us against the world" aspect. I try to take the opportunity to teach the kids to band together to overcome a common enemy. In this case, the enemy happens to be Mahonz.  ;D Sort of a "Don't give the prick the satisfaction of seeing you quit. Make eye contact with a teammate and let him fill your emotional gas tank."
I might change my warmup to something similar.

Last year, I started warmup with a jog, then progressed to some bag drills. After that, some carioca, shuffles, bear crawls, and beckpedals. Maybe I'll change the movements with plyo stuff after the jogs and agility bags.
Title: Re: What is your idea of conditioning?
Post by: CoachDP on January 03, 2018, 02:19:16 PM
Few people outside of this website get that.

Or inside of it.

--Dave
Title: Re: What is your idea of conditioning?
Post by: PSLCOACHROB on January 03, 2018, 02:21:20 PM
Or inside of it.

--Dave
Some people are just hard headed. They can't get past how they were coached. I often think you might of actually had an advantage early on because you didn't play hs ball. Sort of like the kid with 4 years of experience with a bad coach. I'd rather have a kid with no experience.
Title: Re: What is your idea of conditioning?
Post by: CoachDP on January 03, 2018, 02:23:35 PM
I often think you might of actually had an advantage early on because you didn't play hs ball.

Oh, I definitely had an advantage.

The times I've talked to coaches about the stoopid stuff they do that's traced back to the stoopid stuff their coaches did...

--Dave
Title: Re: What is your idea of conditioning?
Post by: PSLCOACHROB on January 03, 2018, 02:38:10 PM
Oh, I definitely had an advantage.

The times I've talked to coaches about the stoopid stuff they do that's traced back to the stoopid stuff their coaches did...

--Dave
I see it every time I watch a youth team practice and often when I watch a hs team practice. Guys just don't know any better and most youth coaches don't even know their are good resources to help them out. The hs guys have no excuse.
Title: Re: What is your idea of conditioning?
Post by: CoachDP on January 03, 2018, 03:02:25 PM
Guys just don't know any better and most youth coaches don't even know their are good resources to help them out. The hs guys have no excuse.

I don't think anyone has an excuse.  If you want to be good at something, then get to work, put in the time and get better.  I've said several times that one of the great things about coaching is that you can be as good as you want to be; there is no opponent stopping you.

Problem is, many guys don't want to coach.  They take the George Costanza route and want to pretend to be.  Constanza never wanted to be an architect.  His dream was to pretend to be an architect.

Guys want to carry the clipboard, blow the whistle, yell and wave their arms.  But when it comes to learning their craft, finding their coaching voice, discovering their motivations, uncovering what they're good (and not so good) at takes hard work and years of study and dedication.  Some do this.  More just pretend to do it.

--Dave
Title: Re: What is your idea of conditioning?
Post by: Vince148 on January 03, 2018, 05:40:16 PM
Some people are just hard headed. They can't get past how they were coached. I often think you might of actually had an advantage early on because you didn't play hs ball. Sort of like the kid with 4 years of experience with a bad coach. I'd rather have a kid with no experience.
I might be at an advantage too. It's been so long since I played HS ball, I can't even tell you what are practices were like. So most of what I learned was definitely from being on here.
Title: Re: What is your idea of conditioning?
Post by: Test Account on January 03, 2018, 05:48:57 PM
Can my kids walk is my idea of conditioning.
Title: Re: What is your idea of conditioning?
Post by: Beansko82 on January 03, 2018, 06:56:45 PM
I might be at an advantage too. It's been so long since I played HS ball, I can't even tell you what are practices were like. So most of what I learned was definitely from being on here.

You ain’t lying. The best thing I probably ever did for my players was to forget everything I’d learned about the game from my HS career.
Title: Re: What is your idea of conditioning?
Post by: gumby_in_co on January 03, 2018, 07:38:51 PM
Running sprints is just a waste of time.  Coaches who make their kids "take a lap" after warm-ups inevitably end up yelling, "Don't be last!" as they wait for Little Billy and Fat Freddy.  That's often followed with, "You better run!"  (Or else, what?  You're going to make him run [I mean, walk] again?)

--Dave

Actually, we stress staying together as a team and yell at the track stars who leave their brothers behind.
Title: Re: What is your idea of conditioning?
Post by: Vince148 on January 03, 2018, 08:20:28 PM
Actually, we stress staying together as a team and yell at the track stars who leave their brothers behind.
Same here. I want them going around the field like they are a military company. No one gets left behind.
Title: Re: What is your idea of conditioning?
Post by: Michael on January 03, 2018, 08:36:33 PM
Guys want to carry the clipboard, blow the whistle

When I coach football, I don't use either of those.

There's always somebody who has a whistle.  People seem to like buying those.
Title: Re: What is your idea of conditioning?
Post by: Michael on January 03, 2018, 08:38:19 PM
I might change my warmup to something similar.

Last year, I started warmup with a jog, then progressed to some bag drills. After that, some carioca, shuffles, bear crawls, and beckpedals. Maybe I'll change the movements with plyo stuff after the jogs and agility bags.

I do it the Switzer way.  Just throw out some frisbees before practice.  When it's time to start practicing, everyone is loose and warm.
Title: Re: What is your idea of conditioning?
Post by: Vince148 on January 03, 2018, 08:58:43 PM
I do it the Switzer way.  Just throw out some frisbees before practice.  When it's time to start practicing, everyone is loose and warm.
The kids usually get there early and play some touch beforehand.
Title: Re: What is your idea of conditioning?
Post by: Test Account on January 03, 2018, 09:18:31 PM
We just ran super simple stuff that everybody else runs. We just ran it better because we practiced better. Few people outside of this website get that.
l what great idea!!! While foaming in sarcasm, it really is great advice
Title: Re: What is your idea of conditioning?
Post by: Bob Goodman on January 03, 2018, 11:06:36 PM
Inevitably, you watch them practice after they ask for advice and help and there the kids are running a lap to start practice and running sprints at the end. Even worse, as pointed out above, cancelling specials or some other important thing to do sprints. I never understood the guys who want advice and help and all they really want is the magic offense and defense. Go ask somebody else. We just ran super simple stuff that everybody else runs. We just ran it better because we practiced better. Few people outside of this website get that.
Why is that?  How did we, who see this, wind up here?  Did we scare away everyone else?  Run them off?

Is it something about DumCoach?  Or about the WWW generally?

BTW, our practices in 2017 were an example of the "them" you wrote of.
Title: Re: What is your idea of conditioning?
Post by: Bob Goodman on January 03, 2018, 11:11:31 PM
I might be at an advantage too. It's been so long since I played HS ball, I can't even tell you what are practices were like. So most of what I learned was definitely from being on here.
I didn't play interscholastic anything except chess, so I should be a coaching genius.
Title: Re: What is your idea of conditioning?
Post by: coachdoug on January 04, 2018, 04:18:53 AM
I consider conditioning to be bldg. long-term endurance.  Like a printed program I was handed when I was playing rugby, to be done over the summer between spring & fall season.  I think it took a minimum of 7 weeks, graded sprints, to be done after a distance run, but I never did the distance run.  You were to judge progress by your ability to keep your pulse under a certain figure.

I would never do that sort of thing with kids I coach in football.  For one thing, I don't think it'd work unless you had that amount of time before pre-season began, nor would I expect kids to do it 5-6 days/week over that time as prescribed.  For another, I don't think children need or benefit from that kind of conditioning for football.  I wrote last season about how I never saw them breathing hard in games the way they did from the sprints our coaches made them do, even though we had a roster of only 15.  If they were playing rugby, they'd have more need of it.  Some kids actually love doing the sprints if you make races out of them, but others are just bored or bothered by them, and we're here to play football, not run track.

If I could have kids work on anything truly off-season, it'd probably be weight lifting, & for those who groove to that, fine, but even there I think a little technique (which you can coach) or size (which you can't) beats a lot of strength.  For safety's sake, though, I would like them to strengthen the muscles that dorsiflex the neck, and considering that the time they'll have for that will probably be at home (no partners, no equipment), I'd expect that to be accomplished by back bridges.
Bob - this may be the single most intelligent post you've ever made.  I'm not sure about the back bridges part at the end (not saying it's wrong, just saying that I don't know if that is valid or not), but the rest of it is spot on.  Well done.
Title: Re: What is your idea of conditioning?
Post by: coachdoug on January 04, 2018, 04:33:51 AM
When I coach football, I don't use either of those.

There's always somebody who has a whistle.  People seem to like buying those.
This past season we had 14 coaches on staff (across all 3 HS levels - Varsity, JV, and Frosh).  I think the only guy who had a whistle was my JV O-line coach.  And even with him, I think he only had his because one day the Varsity HC asked if anyone had a whistle and he was the only one who volunteered that he had one, so all season long, whenever we needed a whistle, the coaches all looked to him.  I had a whistle in my bag, but I never pulled it out all season.
Title: Re: What is your idea of conditioning?
Post by: coachdoug on January 04, 2018, 04:37:53 AM
Exactly, conditioning should mimic the sport you are playing. High intensity football drills with a high speed practice is all we ever needed. We ran hurry up 100% of the time and the other teams were always gassed long before we were even though I know many of them ran sprints every day.
Yes, this ^^^ exactly.
Title: Re: What is your idea of conditioning?
Post by: Vince148 on January 04, 2018, 06:26:42 AM
When I coach football, I don't use either of those.

There's always somebody who has a whistle.  People seem to like buying those.
When I remember to bring my whistle, I never start a drill with a whistle, only to end a drill. That's because I want them to start on the sound and keep going until they hear the whistle.
Title: Re: What is your idea of conditioning?
Post by: Bob Goodman on January 04, 2018, 10:02:24 AM
This past season we had 14 coaches on staff (across all 3 HS levels - Varsity, JV, and Frosh).  I think the only guy who had a whistle was my JV O-line coach.  And even with him, I think he only had his because one day the Varsity HC asked if anyone had a whistle and he was the only one who volunteered that he had one, so all season long, whenever we needed a whistle, the coaches all looked to him.  I had a whistle in my bag, but I never pulled it out all season.
That's why I stopped looking for my whistles -- must be somewhere in the garage, where I put stuff I packed from moving that I wouldn't need immediately -- after about a week after practice started.  6 coaches for 15 kids.  There was one instant during the entire season when I wished I had a whistle to stop something, I don't remember what, but it got taken care of.

At the after-season party, they presented us each a stainless whistle engraved w our own name & "Newton Braves".  Aww.
Title: Re: What is your idea of conditioning?
Post by: CoachDP on January 04, 2018, 10:05:09 AM
I might be at an advantage too. It's been so long since I played HS ball, I can't even tell you what are practices were like. So most of what I learned was definitely from being on here.

Vince, no doubt I've learned a lot here.  I've also learned from attending or teaching clinics, visiting practices, studying film, etc.  But most of all, I've learned from doing.  Coaching the game and finding what worked for us and what didn't work and trying to apply that edge immediately, not somewhere down the line.  So while this site is helpful, I can't say that "most" of what I learned came from here.  Most of what I've learned has come from actually coaching, not reading a website.  Coaches have to go out into the field, find their coaching voice (i.e., through trial and error, learn what works and doesn't work for them), put their hands on bodies and just coach.  That's still the best way to learn.  Everything else just augments the on-the-field process.

--Dave

Title: Re: What is your idea of conditioning?
Post by: Bob Goodman on January 04, 2018, 10:10:53 AM
When I remember to bring my whistle, I never start a drill with a whistle, only to end a drill. That's because I want them to start on the sound and keep going until they hear the whistle.
Yes, that was a point I thought of myself, and then one day forgot in my 1st yr. w the Warriors, upon which The Chief (founder of the club in 1952) came over & told me the same thing.  Unfortunately my HC in the Braves in 2017 didn't go by it.  Our team did get some late-hit penalties during the season; it's unlikely they'd've avoided them just by the constant reinforcement of "whistle means stop", but you never know, and it couldn't've hurt.  I think Gabe Infante at the USA Football clinic made the same point.
Title: Re: What is your idea of conditioning?
Post by: CoachDP on January 04, 2018, 10:16:18 AM
I never start a drill with a whistle, only to end a drill.

^ This.

--Dave
Title: Re: What is your idea of conditioning?
Post by: Test Account on January 04, 2018, 10:18:08 AM
Vince, no doubt I've learned a lot here.  I've also learned from attending or teaching clinics, visiting practices, studying film, etc.  But most of all, I've learned from doing.  Coaching the game and finding what worked for us and what didn't work and trying to apply that edge immediately, not somewhere down the line.  So while this site is helpful, I can't say that "most" of what I learned came from here.  Most of what I've learned has come from actually coaching, not reading a website.  Coaches have to go out into the field, find their coaching voice (i.e., through trial and error, learn what works and doesn't work for them), put their hands on bodies and just coach.  That's still the best way to learn.  Everything else just augments the on-the-field process.

--Dave
you combine the experiences an what I have found is  that the rate of growth accelerates multiple times over. Reading as much as some would hate to hear is the best way to augment coaching experience other than art of doing
Title: Re: What is your idea of conditioning?
Post by: gumby_in_co on January 05, 2018, 10:50:49 AM
There's always somebody who has a whistle.  People seem to like buying those.

Whistles are a pain in the ass. I have at least 20, but always seem to be looking for one. I get yelled at in practice if I need one and don't have one, which becomes apparent when I am forced to yell "WHISTLE!" or make a "tweet" sound.  Loud whistling through my teeth is a skill that always eluded me except for a brief period where I lost a front tooth to hockey. I got an implant post and for a brief time, I had a temporary tooth that allowed me to whistle loudly. When they put the permanent one in, my whistle was gone. :(

Worst for me is when I bring one to a game. I've caught myself getting ready to blow a play dead from the sideline more than once. I'm paranoid that I will actually blow it one day and get flagged. When I have those close calls, I put the whistle in the gear bag.
Title: Re: What is your idea of conditioning?
Post by: Bob Goodman on January 05, 2018, 08:01:56 PM
I tried not to bring a whistle on game day, because of my fear I'd whistle during warmups and interfere w a game in progress.  Usually warmups are close enough to the game field -- or somebody's game-or-something field -- that I wouldn't trust the sound not to be confusing.  I had to keep reminding them during split-field scrimmages to not have the offenses starting in the middle, but instead from either end, for that reason.
Title: Re: What is your idea of conditioning?
Post by: mahonz on January 05, 2018, 09:36:56 PM
....or make a "tweet" sound.

I thought you were mocking me.  :P

Im a whistle guy as Lar can attest. Im not sure how anyone can function without one.
Title: Re: What is your idea of conditioning?
Post by: gumby_in_co on January 06, 2018, 12:36:09 AM
I tried not to bring a whistle on game day, because of my fear I'd whistle during warmups and interfere w a game in progress.  Usually warmups are close enough to the game field -- or somebody's game-or-something field -- that I wouldn't trust the sound not to be confusing.  I had to keep reminding them during split-field scrimmages to not have the offenses starting in the middle, but instead from either end, for that reason.

That doesn’t bother me in the least. Our header and my other o-line coach would “tell” me not to use my whistle in pre-game while other games were going on. I’d just give them the stink eye and keep tweeting to my little heart’s content. There are usually 5 games going on all around us and all you can hear is the sound of whistles.
Title: Re: What is your idea of conditioning?
Post by: gumby_in_co on January 06, 2018, 12:38:15 AM
I thought you were mocking me.  :P

Im a whistle guy as Lar can attest. Im not sure how anyone can function without one.

Pretty dumb to come down on the kids for coming to practice with missing gear and then not bother to bring a whistle.
Title: Re: What is your idea of conditioning?
Post by: Bob Goodman on January 06, 2018, 09:44:19 PM
How about the time you blew the whistle so loud they stopped playing baseball on the next field & 2 pickpockets dropped their loot?