Author Topic: Defensive End Play  (Read 3798 times)

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Offline JrTitan

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Defensive End Play
« on: April 20, 2013, 07:45:46 PM »
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Our ends are “old school” type ends. Since we play from a two point stance and mainly on air, they do not need to be the most physical players. They should be agile and quick enough to play linebacker and can take on a kick out block and squeeze it down.

Both defensive ends use two point stances with the outside foot slightly back, weight on the front foot and shoulders square. At the snap, both take two read steps across the line of scrimmage reading the near back. The ends should be careful not to “box” or penetrate deeper than the heels of the offensive line. After the read steps, the defensive ends should have their outside leg and arm free and shoulders square to the line of scrimmage. The strong end is aligned in a wide 9 technique and his stance can be more relaxed since he is aligned on air. The weak defensive end aligns in a 5 technique (unless he is to a closed side in which case he also aligns in a 9 technique) and his stance is more aggressive so he can take on a turn out block by the tackle.

The primary responsibility of the strong side end is contain. He has responsibility for the D gap and must squeeze everything outside in. The strong end is responsible for the quarterback on the option and rushes on pass plays targeting the quarterbacks near shoulder and number.

As the strong defensive end takes his read steps, he is looking at the flow of the near back. In split backs this is the halfback. Versus the I formation, he keys the first back that comes his direction. If both backs come his direction, he keys the fullback (lead back). There are five primary moves the near back can make:



#1 Near back goes away

Immediately think in order: inside counter, bootleg, and reverse. The end should think systematically: (1) squeeze the counter inside by adjusting charge angle down the line of scrimmage –look for pulling lineman and squeeze the kick out block keeping outside arm and leg free – do not spill the trap; (2) attack the quarterback bootleg path if he has the ball; (3) trail the play going away as deep as the deepest back expecting reverse or quarterback reverse scramble



#2 Near back dives straight ahead

If the near back dives inside, the end adjusts his charge as described above for closing down the counter. The end should look for in order: (1) off tackle trap and (2) dive option. Versus the trap he squeezes the play inside, taking on the trap block with a low inside shoulder keeping his outside arm and leg free as described above. If the quarterback opens up and shows his numbers, the end attacks the quarterback’s numbers, working his head to the up field armpit. The end should hit the quarterback at the mesh point (B gap) – attacking hard and fast. If the TE blocks out on the end, Sam reacts to his visual key back inside and attacks the quarterback. Essentially, Sam switches options assignments with the end. The end must read the kick out block by the TE and momentarily jam the TE and then jump to the pitch. The safety needs to fill the alley playing quarterback to pitch on the option and covering any delayed release by the TE.



#3 Near back kicks out

When the near back takes an inside-out approach, the end should expect an off-tackle play. The end attacks all kick out blocks by attacking the block with the near shoulder while keeping shoulders square and squeezing the line of scrimmage. Keep outside leverage (outside leg and arm free) and look for the play to bounce outside. If the play bounces outside, keep runner on inside shoulder, work outside, and force back inside. (See Power below)

#4 Near back sets for pass protection

When the near back set for pass protection, the end should expect a drop back pass or draw. Rush the quarterback’s near number and maintain contain.

#5 Near back flows outside

If the near back moves laterally, the end should read sweep, sprint out pass or sprint option. The end must keep contain or force the play deep keeping the ball carrier on his inside shoulder. If the near back is responsible for blocking the end, the end must attack and defeat the block by keeping his shoulders square to the line of scrimmage and taking on the block with his inside shoulder and forearm keeping his outside leg and arm free. (See Sweep below)




The weak defensive end aligns in a 5 technique and is responsible for the C gap and contain. Has the QB on the option and rushes the QB’s outside number versus the pass. He can play more aggressive than the 9 technique when he has contain support from the Rover linebacker. The ends pressure key is the offensive tackle and his visual key is the near back (no near back, key fullback). At the snap, the end takes two read steps across the line of scrimmage (step with inside foot first) and squeeze the line of scrimmage. On his second step, he should have his outside leg and arm free and his shoulders square to the line of scrimmage. He must not attack beyond the heels of the tackle. If tackle blocks out, the end neutralizes him and keeps his feet moving controlling C gap with his body and squeezing the tackles into the B gap. He must always keep his outside arm and leg free. If tackle release inside, the end steps down keying the near back (no near back, key fullback) always think kick-out, option, play away. The weak end reacts to his near back similar to the strong end. The end squeezes inside and read for near back or puller coming at him. If the tackle reaches outside, widen and keep outside leg and arm free. The end defeats the reach block by locking out the outside arm and pulling with the inside arm, work feet and hips up field, and escape with a rip move. He can not allow himself to get hooked.


FIST Technique

An alternate FIST technique can also be used by either end:



Stance: A two point stance with the inside foot is back with most of the weight on the front foot. The feet should be inside their shoulders about 6” to 10” apart. The front foot is the drive foot and the back foot as the balance foot. The stance is not a contact stance; the upper body should be relaxed and poised for movement.

Alignment: The ends should have their inside foot a yard outside of the offensive tight end or tackle, on a line that is at a 45° angle to the line of scrimmage. They should be “running” through the stance of their near back key and crowding the ball.

Initial Movement: The ends key the ball for movement. They read the near back through the tight end or tackle. The read steps are taken on the line through the near back’s stance. The initial step is taken with the inside foot. The ends should pick up the direction and movement of the near back, blocking scheme and level of the ball as above.

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Offline Pearls of Wisdom

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Re: Defensive End Play
« Reply #1 on: April 22, 2013, 04:56:46 PM »
BUMPED FROM OLD FORUM


Our ends are “old school” type ends. Since we play from a two point stance and mainly on air, they do not need to be the most physical players. They should be agile and quick enough to play linebacker and can take on a kick out block and squeeze it down.

Both defensive ends use two point stances with the outside foot slightly back, weight on the front foot and shoulders square. At the snap, both take two read steps across the line of scrimmage reading the near back. The ends should be careful not to “box” or penetrate deeper than the heels of the offensive line. After the read steps, the defensive ends should have their outside leg and arm free and shoulders square to the line of scrimmage. The strong end is aligned in a wide 9 technique and his stance can be more relaxed since he is aligned on air. The weak defensive end aligns in a 5 technique (unless he is to a closed side in which case he also aligns in a 9 technique) and his stance is more aggressive so he can take on a turn out block by the tackle.

The primary responsibility of the strong side end is contain. He has responsibility for the D gap and must squeeze everything outside in. The strong end is responsible for the quarterback on the option and rushes on pass plays targeting the quarterbacks near shoulder and number.

As the strong defensive end takes his read steps, he is looking at the flow of the near back. In split backs this is the halfback. Versus the I formation, he keys the first back that comes his direction. If both backs come his direction, he keys the fullback (lead back). There are five primary moves the near back can make:



#1 Near back goes away

Immediately think in order: inside counter, bootleg, and reverse. The end should think systematically: (1) squeeze the counter inside by adjusting charge angle down the line of scrimmage –look for pulling lineman and squeeze the kick out block keeping outside arm and leg free – do not spill the trap; (2) attack the quarterback bootleg path if he has the ball; (3) trail the play going away as deep as the deepest back expecting reverse or quarterback reverse scramble



#2 Near back dives straight ahead

If the near back dives inside, the end adjusts his charge as described above for closing down the counter. The end should look for in order: (1) off tackle trap and (2) dive option. Versus the trap he squeezes the play inside, taking on the trap block with a low inside shoulder keeping his outside arm and leg free as described above. If the quarterback opens up and shows his numbers, the end attacks the quarterback’s numbers, working his head to the up field armpit. The end should hit the quarterback at the mesh point (B gap) – attacking hard and fast. If the TE blocks out on the end, Sam reacts to his visual key back inside and attacks the quarterback. Essentially, Sam switches options assignments with the end. The end must read the kick out block by the TE and momentarily jam the TE and then jump to the pitch. The safety needs to fill the alley playing quarterback to pitch on the option and covering any delayed release by the TE.



#3 Near back kicks out

When the near back takes an inside-out approach, the end should expect an off-tackle play. The end attacks all kick out blocks by attacking the block with the near shoulder while keeping shoulders square and squeezing the line of scrimmage. Keep outside leverage (outside leg and arm free) and look for the play to bounce outside. If the play bounces outside, keep runner on inside shoulder, work outside, and force back inside. (See Power below)

#4 Near back sets for pass protection

When the near back set for pass protection, the end should expect a drop back pass or draw. Rush the quarterback’s near number and maintain contain.

#5 Near back flows outside

If the near back moves laterally, the end should read sweep, sprint out pass or sprint option. The end must keep contain or force the play deep keeping the ball carrier on his inside shoulder. If the near back is responsible for blocking the end, the end must attack and defeat the block by keeping his shoulders square to the line of scrimmage and taking on the block with his inside shoulder and forearm keeping his outside leg and arm free. (See Sweep below)




The weak defensive end aligns in a 5 technique and is responsible for the C gap and contain. Has the QB on the option and rushes the QB’s outside number versus the pass. He can play more aggressive than the 9 technique when he has contain support from the Rover linebacker. The ends pressure key is the offensive tackle and his visual key is the near back (no near back, key fullback). At the snap, the end takes two read steps across the line of scrimmage (step with inside foot first) and squeeze the line of scrimmage. On his second step, he should have his outside leg and arm free and his shoulders square to the line of scrimmage. He must not attack beyond the heels of the tackle. If tackle blocks out, the end neutralizes him and keeps his feet moving controlling C gap with his body and squeezing the tackles into the B gap. He must always keep his outside arm and leg free. If tackle release inside, the end steps down keying the near back (no near back, key fullback) always think kick-out, option, play away. The weak end reacts to his near back similar to the strong end. The end squeezes inside and read for near back or puller coming at him. If the tackle reaches outside, widen and keep outside leg and arm free. The end defeats the reach block by locking out the outside arm and pulling with the inside arm, work feet and hips up field, and escape with a rip move. He can not allow himself to get hooked.


FIST Technique

An alternate FIST technique can also be used by either end:



Stance: A two point stance with the inside foot is back with most of the weight on the front foot. The feet should be inside their shoulders about 6” to 10” apart. The front foot is the drive foot and the back foot as the balance foot. The stance is not a contact stance; the upper body should be relaxed and poised for movement.

Alignment: The ends should have their inside foot a yard outside of the offensive tight end or tackle, on a line that is at a 45° angle to the line of scrimmage. They should be “running” through the stance of their near back key and crowding the ball.

Initial Movement: The ends key the ball for movement. They read the near back through the tight end or tackle. The read steps are taken on the line through the near back’s stance. The initial step is taken with the inside foot. The ends should pick up the direction and movement of the near back, blocking scheme and level of the ball as above.


GOOD WORK!
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Offline CoachCraig

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Re: Defensive End Play
« Reply #2 on: April 23, 2013, 10:51:49 AM »
good stuff coach.  diagrams help alot.
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Offline Dusty Ol Fart

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Re: Defensive End Play
« Reply #3 on: April 23, 2013, 12:31:13 PM »
Perhaps it was the talent level I had but I used JR's defense a ton last season and averaged 13 points against.   Alignment has a lot to do with putting the LMOLOS in a conundrum.  Who is the DE and which person do I block?

Similar to Jack's 6-3 in that If I build that Outside Edge right DB,OSLB, & DE it all but forces everything inside or strings them out.   I put ANGRY BEEF at DT and the ISLB's didnt have to be real fast just Major Hitters.

 ;)
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Offline jcarbon2

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Re: Defensive End Play
« Reply #4 on: September 15, 2013, 11:45:39 PM »
Expert in "BRAIN DEAD DEFENSE" and the "CAVEMAN SPREAD"

Offline JrTitan

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Re: Defensive End Play
« Reply #5 on: September 16, 2013, 09:31:36 PM »
JrTitan,

Of these two whicj is more like your tech?? Its like this??


http://www.playsportstv.com/football/football-defensive-line_role-of-the-defensive-end

Or this one??



Thanks,

John

Closer to the first
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Offline Dusty Ol Fart

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Re: Defensive End Play
« Reply #6 on: September 16, 2013, 10:52:16 PM »
JrTitan,

Of these two whicj is more like your tech?? Its like this??


http://www.playsportstv.com/football/football-defensive-line_role-of-the-defensive-end

Or this one??


How to Play Defensive End : How to Contain a Play as a Defensive End


Thanks,

John

John:

I know Paul has already answered (and I completely agree) I'll just add that I am not really sure what the coach is trying to accomplish in the second video.  I'm confused about the technique as well as what he calls skating and why its necessary? 

Personally, I haven't found a reason not to squeeze unless of course your not the Contain player.   ;)

Not MPP... ONE TASK!  Teach them!  :)

Offline jcarbon2

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Re: Defensive End Play
« Reply #7 on: September 18, 2013, 11:58:31 PM »
John:

I know Paul has already answered (and I completely agree) I'll just add that I am not really sure what the coach is trying to accomplish in the second video.  I'm confused about the technique as well as what he calls skating and why its necessary? 

Personally, I haven't found a reason not to squeeze unless of course your not the Contain player.   ;)

Shad,

The second tech is what they call "skate" or "slide" . What I have read is that if you are getting reached (TE or WB/Slot) you engage and move to a position two yards wide and three deep. Nothing crosses your facemask. Its just another way to skin the cat. Used by 9 tech OLB's or DE's to string out wide plays.

John

John

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Offline Dusty Ol Fart

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Re: Defensive End Play
« Reply #8 on: September 19, 2013, 12:49:36 AM »
Shad,

The second tech is what they call "skate" or "slide" . What I have read is that if you are getting reached (TE or WB/Slot) you engage and move to a position two yards wide and three deep. Nothing crosses your facemask. Its just another way to skin the cat. Used by 9 tech OLB's or DE's to string out wide plays.

John

John

John:

In JR's defense the DE is not necessarily the "Contain" man.  In fact, more often than not, he isnt Contain.  Damn how effective is that?   ;)    You are exactly right to assume and demand that the "contain" player CANNOT allow the ball  to cross his face.  If he does LOOK OUT!!

An "EPIC FAIL" that will lead to defeat if it happens too often!!

 ;) 
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Offline JrTitan

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Re: Defensive End Play
« Reply #9 on: September 19, 2013, 05:29:28 AM »
John:

In JR's defense the DE is not necessarily the "Contain" man.  In fact, more often than not, he isnt Contain. 

The strong end is responsible for contain 100% of the time and the weak end 90% of the time (he gets help from the OLB).
"They call it coaching but it is teaching...You do not just tell them...you show them the reasons"

"You have to be smart enough to understand the game, and dumb enough to think it's important."

“…you have no bad habits to break...We either coach it or are allowing allowing it to happen.”

Offline jcarbon2

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Re: Defensive End Play
« Reply #10 on: September 19, 2013, 07:31:56 AM »
The strong end is responsible for contain 100% of the time and the weak end 90% of the time (he gets help from the OLB).

JrTitan,

Thanks for clearing that up.
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Offline Dusty Ol Fart

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Re: Defensive End Play
« Reply #11 on: September 19, 2013, 09:44:46 AM »
Damn Wrong again...... :'( :'(

Oh well it worked when I screwed it up.  Had to be the players.   ;)
Not MPP... ONE TASK!  Teach them!  :)