Author Topic: Defending the "Swinging Gate"  (Read 1863 times)

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Offline coachgye

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Defending the "Swinging Gate"
« on: October 30, 2015, 04:50:29 AM »
How would you defend this?

...E.T.G.C.G.T.........E.................
............B.................B...........B..
.............................Q................

I team came out in this first play and we were not prepared.  Luckily they could not execute and they never went back to it.

I was thinking:
............................F..................
C....2....................1..............C...
.5...E....N...E..2........5................
...E.T.G.C.G.T.........E..................
............B.................B...........B..
.............................Q.................

Offline Michael ODonnell

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Re: Defending the "Swinging Gate"
« Reply #1 on: October 30, 2015, 11:54:04 AM »
Ideally, you defend numbers with numbers . . . against the flanker to the right, you put out a DB; against the middle 3 (snapper, RB, and QB), you put 3; and against the rest, you put the rest of your defense. In fine tuning your match ups you need to take into account the skills of their players without short changing yourself too badly in another area.

For example, if their flanker on the right is their primary receiver, you may want to double team him by pulling one of your defenders from "the mass" which does leave you one defender short but there are a lot of numbers there already. If someone in the middle 3 grouping is a huge threat, you may need to bolster that area with another defender.

The key is to initially match numbers with numbers and then adjust to their skills.
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Offline coachgye

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Re: Defending the "Swinging Gate"
« Reply #2 on: November 02, 2015, 12:53:07 PM »
Ideally, you defend numbers with numbers . . . against the flanker to the right, you put out a DB; against the middle 3 (snapper, RB, and QB), you put 3; and against the rest, you put the rest of your defense. In fine tuning your match ups you need to take into account the skills of their players without short changing yourself too badly in another area.

For example, if their flanker on the right is their primary receiver, you may want to double team him by pulling one of your defenders from "the mass" which does leave you one defender short but there are a lot of numbers there already. If someone in the middle 3 grouping is a huge threat, you may need to bolster that area with another defender.

The key is to initially match numbers with numbers and then adjust to their skills.

Yeah I understand the most important thing is to match-up and not get caught outflanked or outnumbered.  My question was more about with this specific defense who goes where to match-up and if my adjustment was the right one.  I think next year I will have my nose count the number of lineman from the sideline and tell him to line up on #4 to set the defense.

Offline coachgt

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Re: Defending the "Swinging Gate"
« Reply #3 on: December 02, 2015, 01:27:49 AM »
I don't think you use the 1 to cover at all in 521. I think that if you teach the rules C counts to 4 and CB has 1, 5 has 2, FS has 4 and from there use an X call to send your 2 towards the QB. You shouldn't be out flanked or out numbered
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