Author Topic: Inside Zone Combos  (Read 12344 times)

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Offline blockandtackle

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Re: Inside Zone Combos
« Reply #75 on: December 05, 2016, 06:41:26 PM »
Our rule was you can't leave early and lose the LB over the top (which means he was never yours) and get picked, and you can't leave late and have him go past you before you get there.  In between those two points is (a) some time and (b) some space on the field.  That's the sweet spot.  You leave when the LB is in the sweet spot.  Not before and not after, but as soon as you know for a fact he is in it.  We did a ton of a particular drill that really helped the kids get good at it.

The sweet spot is when the LB is within arm's length of you.

A good zone RB will press the LOS and bring the LB to you.

Offline Michael

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Re: Inside Zone Combos
« Reply #76 on: December 05, 2016, 07:27:54 PM »
Yes, he will.
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Offline coachmsl

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Re: Inside Zone Combos
« Reply #77 on: December 07, 2016, 08:49:17 PM »
To add to what has already been said...we "deliver the DL to the LB's Lap".  If that is a passive action, they my jimmy's are better than your joe's and it won't matter what I teach. 

the other thing is that OL have to KNOW (drilled in to them so it is second nature) the relationship between space and leaving the combo/DL...in other words, "when to come off of the DL."  The distance/space between an OL and an LB that the OL needs to stay on the DL or leave to the LB is going to be different for each OL.  I start with "an arm's length away" and adjust for each player, as needed.  Just as an example, let's say that a RG and a C are combo'ing a DL inside shade of the RG and an LB stacked in the B gap to the right, while running IZ to the right...

RG will go "big to to little toe" with his right foot and slam his left flipper into the near number of the DL.  It is imperative that the RG does NOT put his right hand on the DL, as this will turn his shoulders and, therefore, take his eyes off of the LB.  The C will step to take the playside number of the DL, and get hip to hip with the RG.  As the playside LB comes downhill to break glass through the B gap, the RG will stay on the DL until the LB is an arm's length away from the LB...once the LB has gotten to that distance, then and only then, will the RG come off to the LB with a great base.

Good description Coach.  Talk about hands and face placement of the C if u wouldn't mind 
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Offline defensewins

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Re: Inside Zone Combos
« Reply #78 on: December 08, 2016, 04:59:53 PM »
In this case, our C is getting both hands on the near number of the DL.  He has "bad eyes" in this case because the LB is aligned on the other side of the DL and RG (meaning the RG and DL are both inside of the C and the LB).  The RG has "good eyes" in this case because there is no one between the RG and LB in the combo.  So, for us, the one with bad eyes is going to get both hands on near number while trying to get both eyes on the LB; the OL with good eyes has the flipper on the DL with both eyes on the LB.  Initial hat placement will be on the near number for the C.  But after the C strikes, he will be a bit higher (hit on the rise) to attempt to get both eyes on the LB. 

I should also point out the aiming point of our back (which ties in to the technique by our C here).  Our monument/track of the RB is the midline/crack of the C.  That is super tight, compared to many tracks on IZ.  Rarely do we get a bounce look...we almost always get the cutback. 

Offline coachmsl

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Re: Inside Zone Combos
« Reply #79 on: December 11, 2016, 09:12:45 AM »
In this case, our C is getting both hands on the near number of the DL.  He has "bad eyes" in this case because the LB is aligned on the other side of the DL and RG (meaning the RG and DL are both inside of the C and the LB).  The RG has "good eyes" in this case because there is no one between the RG and LB in the combo.  So, for us, the one with bad eyes is going to get both hands on near number while trying to get both eyes on the LB; the OL with good eyes has the flipper on the DL with both eyes on the LB.  Initial hat placement will be on the near number for the C.  But after the C strikes, he will be a bit higher (hit on the rise) to attempt to get both eyes on the LB. 

I should also point out the aiming point of our back (which ties in to the technique by our C here).  Our monument/track of the RB is the midline/crack of the C.  That is super tight, compared to many tracks on IZ.  Rarely do we get a bounce look...we almost always get the cutback.

Thanks Coach.  Many teach IZ if the B gap is a bubble to cram the b Gap.  This is interesting what you are saying.   
What makes the grass grow?...........BLOOD!