Author Topic: KOTS Tackling  (Read 2417 times)

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Offline CoachAD

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KOTS Tackling
« on: August 01, 2018, 10:09:59 AM »
  I think this came from CoachDP a few years back and stands for Kick Out The Stilts.  As I remember, it's basically open field tackling by throwing the entire body at the lower extremities of the ball carrier.  I've dabbled with it for some smaller type CB's at times in the past but am considering really trying to break down the progression and teach it as a primary method of tackling - or at least an alternate method of tackling to the Hawk tackling we've started teaching to date.

  The impetus for this was our first padded practice on Saturday and feedback from a couple of the smarter 7 year olds.  When asked why they were letting the ball-carrier pass them in an angle tackling drill, their response was "I have to let him pass to get my head behind him".  Even if the tackler takes a great angle and beats him to the point where they intersect, he runs the very real risk of losing him momentum and allowing the ball carrier to run through an arm tackle.

  If the motivator of the change in tackling methodology is to take the head out of the tackle, I can't see how the head could get farther away than this.  IF I was to do this, I'm trying to figure out how to break down the progression:

1. Adjust your angle and make adjustments by thinking "step on their toes".  I've taught this for years and it seems to be fairly simple and reasonably sound.
2. Just as you get to the ball carrier, launch yourself "cross ways" at his ankles.
3. The aiming point would be the tacklers hip at the ball carriers ankles.

  The only concussion risk I can see is maybe a knee to the helmet and I'd have to believe it would be much more rare than a helmet to helmet on a more traditional tackle.  This feels like a radical departure from what I've ever taught.  It also makes a lot of sense when I apply logic to it, (i.e. if a kid "whoas up" or lowers his head to get his face away from the impact - this is a way for them to get their face away without slowing down).  I think I could expect a lot more engagement and energy from the tacklers.

  Having said all of this - I'm old school to a large degree and feel stupid even posting this.  Tell me why this wont work, why I shouldn't try it, or why it's interesting and you want me to be the guinea pig and report back on it if I more forward.....

Offline CoachDP

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Re: KOTS Tackling
« Reply #1 on: August 01, 2018, 11:36:56 AM »
I think this came from CoachDP a few years back and stands for Kick Out The Stilts.

--Yes, it's how we teach our smaller players to tackle when they are tackling a larger player.

As I remember, it's basically open field tackling by throwing the entire body at the lower extremities of the ball carrier.

--You remember correctly.

The impetus for this was our first padded practice on Saturday and feedback from a couple of the smarter 7 year olds.  When asked why they were letting the ball-carrier pass them in an angle tackling drill, their response was "I have to let him pass to get my head behind him".  Even if the tackler takes a great angle and beats him to the point where they intersect, he runs the very real risk of losing him momentum and allowing the ball carrier to run through an arm tackle.

--Correct, which is why the "get my head behind him" approach is malarky.  Sounds like you have some really smart 7-year-olds.

  If the motivator of the change in tackling methodology is to take the head out of the tackle, I can't see how the head could get farther away than this.  IF I was to do this, I'm trying to figure out how to break down the progression:

1. Adjust your angle and make adjustments by thinking "step on their toes".  I've taught this for years and it seems to be fairly simple and reasonably sound.

--I've never used a "step on their toes" instruction for this because usually their launch point is much further away and if you're stepping on the ball-carrier's toes then you are too close to hit the shin area.

2. Just as you get to the ball carrier, launch yourself "cross ways" at his ankles.

--Yes.

3. The aiming point would be the tacklers hip at the ball carriers ankles.

--The aiming point is between the ball-carrier's ankle and knee.

The only concussion risk I can see is maybe a knee to the helmet and I'd have to believe it would be much more rare than a helmet to helmet on a more traditional tackle.

--So rare that I've never seen a concussion that way.  Doesn't mean it couldn't happen, though.

This feels like a radical departure from what I've ever taught.

--Yeah, well that's seems to be what I do.

I think I could expect a lot more engagement and energy from the tacklers.

--Oh, absolutely.  We had "little guys" (even at the high school level) who were not only very adept at this, it made them fierce tacklers.  And the great thing about it is, they are too low to get stiff-armed.  When I coached youth ball, our RBs absolutely hated going up against the little guys in a tackle drill.  There was nothing they could do to protect themselves in the tackle, and they couldn't use their size, strength, force, speed or their stiff-arm to dominate.  To the contrary, all of those "attributes" made them even more vulnerable in the tackling drill.

Having said all of this - I'm old school to a large degree

--Not as old-school as I am.

and feel stupid even posting this.

--What's the worry?

Tell me why this wont work, why I shouldn't try it, or why it's interesting and you want me to be the guinea pig and report back on it if I more forward.

--Uh, it does work.  Which is why we teach it.  Which is why I shared it.  Buy yourself a Slip & Slide and have at it. 

--Dave

« Last Edit: August 01, 2018, 12:03:04 PM by CoachDP »
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Offline joshv155

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Re: KOTS Tackling
« Reply #2 on: August 01, 2018, 12:39:27 PM »
Having trouble picturing it. Any video to share ? We have some little dudes at corner in an unlimited league. Would like to see this.
Passio Bellator

Offline CoachDP

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Re: KOTS Tackling
« Reply #3 on: August 01, 2018, 12:48:32 PM »
Having trouble picturing it. Any video to share ? We have some little dudes at corner in an unlimited league. Would like to see this.

No, like a lot of things, we don't video everything we do.  Especially instruction.  Usually what was videoed was what we were planning to put on the highlight DVD.  Detailed instruction is a real snoozefest, in that regard.

But you can give me a call, and I'll see if I can walk you through it.

--Dave
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Offline Vince148

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Re: KOTS Tackling
« Reply #4 on: August 01, 2018, 01:00:45 PM »
Is the tackler like "rolling" into the ball carrier as he throws himself across where it's his butt and/or low back that is actually contacting the runner?

Offline CoachDP

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Re: KOTS Tackling
« Reply #5 on: August 01, 2018, 01:18:19 PM »
Is the tackler like "rolling" into the ball carrier as he throws himself across where it's his butt and/or low back that is actually contacting the runner?

No, not really.  Has it ended up like that?  Sometimes.  But it's not what we teach.  What we're looking for is pretty much the effect you'd get using a Slip & Slide.  Water it down, sprint, dive, and slide.  Now the teaching progression up to that point is very different and much more detailed.  But the Slip & Slide effect is what we're looking for.  And the littler guys seem to love it.  However, I've seen bigger guys use it because of the type of hit it lays on the ball-carrier.

If you go to the 3:21 mark of the video below, you'll see the result of this technique, except that our guy didn't slide:

https://vimeo.com/5863709

--Dave
"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

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Offline Vince148

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Re: KOTS Tackling
« Reply #6 on: August 01, 2018, 01:32:10 PM »
Similar to cut blocking?

Offline Beansko82

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Re: KOTS Tackling
« Reply #7 on: August 01, 2018, 01:35:59 PM »

Offline CoachDP

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Re: KOTS Tackling
« Reply #8 on: August 01, 2018, 01:43:17 PM »
Holy smokes! 

That was your team CoachDP?

Yes.

--Dave
"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement:
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Offline CoachDP

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Re: KOTS Tackling
« Reply #9 on: August 01, 2018, 01:44:58 PM »
Similar to cut blocking?

Vince, I hadn't really thought about it like that, but yes. 

Dang, I should have combined that with my cut-block drills back in the day.

--Dave
"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement:
"I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go." #BattleReady newhope

Offline Vince148

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Re: KOTS Tackling
« Reply #10 on: August 01, 2018, 04:53:10 PM »
Vince, I hadn't really thought about it like that, but yes. 

Dang, I should have combined that with my cut-block drills back in the day.

--Dave
So, Dave, how do/did/would you coach this? I've never had to coach cut blocking because it's not legal in Michigan and I'm usually blessed with some small corners who could benefit from this.

Offline Michael

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Re: KOTS Tackling
« Reply #11 on: August 01, 2018, 08:39:47 PM »
I know as much about tackling as I know about the floor plan of the Louvre, or about pass coverage, but we use "step on their toes" all the time for blocking. And it works great. However, we use it for after contact is made. And then it works great for driving the guy. If we used it for prior to contact, I imagine we'd have a lot of guys standing straight up and getting drilled. I could see it working for tackling after contact, similar to Pete Carroll's "drive for five" or whatever it is, but I don't know if I'd have a guy coming for a tackle trying to step on a guy's feet. But hey, I could well be wrong. But as I said, the "step on their toes" is a major point for us, so I thought I'd throw in when we use it and when we don't.
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Offline CoachAD

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Re: KOTS Tackling
« Reply #12 on: August 02, 2018, 09:35:35 AM »
I know as much about tackling as I know about the floor plan of the Louvre, or about pass coverage, but we use "step on their toes" all the time for blocking. And it works great. However, we use it for after contact is made. And then it works great for driving the guy. If we used it for prior to contact, I imagine we'd have a lot of guys standing straight up and getting drilled. I could see it working for tackling after contact, similar to Pete Carroll's "drive for five" or whatever it is, but I don't know if I'd have a guy coming for a tackle trying to step on a guy's feet. But hey, I could well be wrong. But as I said, the "step on their toes" is a major point for us, so I thought I'd throw in when we use it and when we don't.

Yeah, we've still tried to fit on contact.  The step on their toes was just to help adjust their angle automatically while tracking the ball carrier.  We don't actually want to step on their toes .

Offline CoachAD

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Re: KOTS Tackling
« Reply #13 on: August 02, 2018, 09:36:16 AM »

Offline Bob Goodman

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Re: KOTS Tackling
« Reply #14 on: August 02, 2018, 02:43:19 PM »
Similar to cut blocking?
Yes, it's just that you don't have to worry about your hands or arms landing in an illegal place.  It's so similar that some call this a cut tackle.  In Rugby League it's called a chop tackle.  (In Rugby Union it doesn't count as a tackle & is arguably dangerous play if there was no attempt to wrap with the hands & arms, or if you deliberately slid or rolled into the contact.)

I haven't taught it, though, and wouldn't for an angle tackle.  If the player dives too early, he can easily get kicked, stepped on, or jumped over.  Too late, and he can wiff by landing past the ballcarrier's path.  You're giving up your own feet while the opponent still has his on the ground.

It's actually a surer tackle when it's a straight-on tackle.  Then the tackler's using low position to overcome the ballcarrier's size, while the ballcarrier doesn't have much chance to alter path.