Author Topic: DE double-team question  (Read 950 times)

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Offline John Doe

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DE double-team question
« on: August 10, 2018, 02:37:50 PM »
How do you guys teach your DEs to handle a double team coming from a TE and a wingback?

Any drills that you run?

Thanks.

Offline CoachDP

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Re: DE double-team question
« Reply #1 on: August 10, 2018, 03:51:31 PM »
How do you guys teach your DEs to handle a double team coming from a TE and a wingback?  Any drills that you run?

The gauntlet is much more difficult than any double-team; it's a 20 against 1 (or however many participants you have).  We coach the eyes primarily and feet and lean secondarily.  Eyes because kids have a general tendency to look back to, and be distracted by, whoever just hit them.  Keeping their eyes on their target gets them away from (what we call) developing personal relationships (with those forming the gauntlet).  Their eyes will take their body where they are looking.  They should just battle through to their target with their eyes on their target.  Feet because long steps do them far more harm than good, the most being a loss of power during contact.  Lean because a forward lean keeps them from playing tall, and playing tall is playing weak.   Your force at impact is negated by the taller you play, so body lean keeps you closer to what we refer to as a Power Position.

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Offline blockandtackle

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Re: DE double-team question
« Reply #2 on: August 26, 2018, 12:23:32 PM »
How do you guys teach your DEs to handle a double team coming from a TE and a wingback?

Any drills that you run?

Thanks.

Try get skinny and push forward on the TE with good leg drive to run through and split it.  Often, that will work.

If you can't do that, grab the TE with your hands and roll your hip hard into the WB's knees to create a pile.

Offline tiger46

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Re: DE double-team question
« Reply #3 on: August 26, 2018, 03:02:38 PM »
What defense are you running?
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Offline blockandtackle

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Re: DE double-team question
« Reply #4 on: August 26, 2018, 03:27:54 PM »
What defense are you running?

This is an important question.  What defense are you running and what's the DE's responsibility?

If you coach him to keep contain and box everything in, he either needs to trade that responsibility with another player (OLB or S) when a WB is outflanking him or he needs to align no less than head up on the WB with someone else in the 4-7 tech area (like a LB or DT) to keep from leaving a huge bubble there.

If he's a spill player, and I like DEs to spill, what I coached above is how I'd do it... but if he's containing that's a whole other ball of wax because he absolutely cannot, under any circumstances, give up that edge.

Offline ZACH

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Re: DE double-team question
« Reply #5 on: August 27, 2018, 09:24:15 AM »
If the offense double teams they are giving you the defense an advantage. Defense now has +1.

What i tell my kids is "split or dig? ...split the double team (we use jack Gregory technique for this of grabbing and nealing) or dig which means we go to ground to pile up that area.

Every defender has a counter part , if one is blocked by 2, this person should be free in a run fit.  If its your end you have a lb, safety, and corner depending on alignment.

Hope this helps
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Offline Maradon

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Re: DE double-team question
« Reply #6 on: November 19, 2018, 02:12:05 AM »
It is very good information.

Offline ZACH

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Re: DE double-team question
« Reply #7 on: November 19, 2018, 01:17:51 PM »
How do you guys teach your DEs to handle a double team coming from a TE and a wingback?

Any drills that you run?

Thanks.

You already have the drill.

Linem up vs that situation with some honesty checks and wallah you have the drill you need for that specific situation.

3v1 (2 blockers +1rb vs def end)

Next put the def end and linebacker in and do the same

Now, add mlb and fb, maybe a safety

Now have it on 2 sides, a drill with 7-8 kids moving at a time.

I drill a lot of these situations in quarters which is essentially what i just described.
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Offline Bob Goodman

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Re: DE double-team question
« Reply #8 on: November 19, 2018, 03:48:12 PM »
As others have pointed out, you shouldn't mind too much having the other team execute an effective double team, inasmuch as you're trading 1 for 2.  Depending on the level of play, what you should try to close off is a combination block, where one of those blockers comes off and is then free to block someone else.

In the case of the combination or "doodad", the likelihood is that the WB is assigned to put the DE onto the OE and then proceed at an angle inside to block at 2nd level.  So what you'd like to do is turn in to, or slide over on, the WB to keep him tied up.  Odds are the OE and WB have not learned to recognize that situation and have the OE come off instead of the WB.

Offline Wing-n-It

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Re: DE double-team question
« Reply #9 on: November 21, 2018, 06:21:13 PM »


Linem up vs that situation with some honesty checks and wallah you have the drill you need for that specific situation.

Eureka !!

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Offline Dusty Ol Fart

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Re: DE double-team question
« Reply #10 on: November 21, 2018, 10:59:08 PM »
This is an important question.  What defense are you running and what's the DE's responsibility?

If you coach him to keep contain and box everything in, he either needs to trade that responsibility with another player (OLB or S) when a WB is outflanking him or he needs to align no less than head up on the WB with someone else in the 4-7 tech area (like a LB or DT) to keep from leaving a huge bubble there.

If he's a spill player, and I like DEs to spill, what I coached above is how I'd do it... but if he's containing that's a whole other ball of wax because he absolutely cannot, under any circumstances, give up that edge.


So True!  For interior guys NT, DT I tell em get skinny and get in their Gap.  Make a pile (Grab Cloth) if you feel yourself going backwards. Make your Gap unuseable!  For a DE (Pick One),  If my job is to attack the backfield  (Force) I take the TE and drive him back in the backfield as best as possible.  If my job is to turn the play inside (Contain) I take the WB and Press him up field as best I can.  What their Role is in your defense tells you how to process the Double Team.  Defeating a double team is difficult but you can still do your job IF you know which one to attack.  There is more technique involved but getting the basic idea will get you far in youth ball.  I suggest finding a copy of John Levra's teaching Defensive line for more involved techniques across the line for all positions and alignments. 
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Offline spidermac

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Re: DE double-team question
« Reply #11 on: November 26, 2018, 04:38:58 PM »

So True!  For interior guys NT, DT I tell em get skinny and get in their Gap.  Make a pile (Grab Cloth) if you feel yourself going backwards. Make your Gap unuseable!  For a DE (Pick One),  If my job is to attack the backfield  (Force) I take the TE and drive him back in the backfield as best as possible.  If my job is to turn the play inside (Contain) I take the WB and Press him up field as best I can.  What their Role is in your defense tells you how to process the Double Team.  Defeating a double team is difficult but you can still do your job IF you know which one to attack.  There is more technique involved but getting the basic idea will get you far in youth ball.  I suggest finding a copy of John Levra's teaching Defensive line for more involved techniques across the line for all positions and alignments.

I actually tell them to grab cloth if they feel themselves no longer going forward...if they already feel themselves going backward its too late :)
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