Author Topic: Linebacker depth in a 5-2  (Read 1075 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline PSLCOACHROB

  • Administrator
  • Diamond
  • Posts: 12501
  • Total likes: 2433
  • Coaching: 14 & Under
  • Defense: 5-3
  • Offense: Multiple
  • Title: Retired
Re: Linebacker depth in a 5-2
« Reply #15 on: August 30, 2018, 10:33:48 AM »
I just chuckle when some coach comes in and says he played college ball so he knows best. Then they line up in some crazy nonsense like that. A friend of the wife knows an ex NFL player. Im a few conversations with the guy I was amazed how much of his knowledge is position centric. This is a guy with about a 10 year career. It boils down to a realization that youth ball is played differently than other levels. In some ways it is very conservative. In others it is extremely high risk. You run different defenses in youth than at the higher levels because most teams run >90% of the time.

Offline Okiespartan

  • Copper
  • Posts: 6
  • Total likes: 0
  • Coaching: 8 & Under
  • Defense: Undecided
  • Offense: Undecided
  • Title: Other
Re: Linebacker depth in a 5-2
« Reply #16 on: August 30, 2018, 12:55:31 PM »
The answer to your question is he cant.  Linebackers are only as good as your front.  If the 5 is getting blown off the ball your son most likely is encountering a Guard, every play.  If the Nose is not on the Snap Hand of the Center he is not being given a competitive advantage over him.  As least for me, the reason I played a 50 front was to put my best backers at an advantage of being unblocked at least 50% of the time.  Hence I was 3-0-3 front most of the time with slants and twists to make is a bit harder for the OL to predict them.  The only way to account for 2 gaps as a linebacker is to get some depth to read.  Again, its hard to read with a Guard in your face every play and no input from the DT.  Especially at the younger ages. 

My question is How much Passing do you see at 3rd grade that you need 2 safeties?  Are the Corners playing Press or Jam?  I suggest soft man at 6 yards so at least you are getting some run support from the Corners in the Alley's. 

Crawl, Walk, Run.

I would say most teams run 90% of the time. Our 1st game was last saturday and that team didnt pass once. We play our corners in man coverage about 3-4 yards off the ball. I have no clue why we are playing two safeties.

Offline blockandtackle

  • Bronze
  • Posts: 804
  • Total likes: 492
  • Coaching: High School
  • Defense: Other
  • Offense: Other
  • Title: Assistant
Re: Linebacker depth in a 5-2
« Reply #17 on: August 30, 2018, 09:29:26 PM »
The coach has them at 5-6 yards away. The safeties are stacked one is 10 yards and the other is 15 yards off the ball.

That 15 yard safety seems wasted.  I once coached with a guy who came up to the HS level after coaching a 5-2 in MS and he wanted ILBs at 6 yards deep, so it's not unheard of.  I didn't care for it, though.

Also, playing college football or even coaching college football doesn't mean a guy is an expert.  There are plenty of people who've played and coached at that level who are morons.  Plenty of people got to "coach" college football because they could recruit or because they were former players and they got hired to do grunt work for a year or two.
« Last Edit: August 30, 2018, 09:56:28 PM by blockandtackle »

Offline blockandtackle

  • Bronze
  • Posts: 804
  • Total likes: 492
  • Coaching: High School
  • Defense: Other
  • Offense: Other
  • Title: Assistant
Re: Linebacker depth in a 5-2
« Reply #18 on: August 30, 2018, 10:05:56 PM »
I just chuckle when some coach comes in and says he played college ball so he knows best. Then they line up in some crazy nonsense like that. A friend of the wife knows an ex NFL player. Im a few conversations with the guy I was amazed how much of his knowledge is position centric. This is a guy with about a 10 year career. It boils down to a realization that youth ball is played differently than other levels. In some ways it is very conservative. In others it is extremely high risk. You run different defenses in youth than at the higher levels because most teams run >90% of the time.

The absolute worst coach I've ever personally worked with was a guy who got handed a HS HC job in his second year out of college.  He'd played 3 years of NAIA ball and "coached" there for another year (meaning he maintained the field, inventoried equipment, and occasionally put players through rope ladder drills).  He had 1 year of HS experience under his belt as a DC and gave up 50 ppg, but they made him HC the next year because they assumed he must know everything about football because of his resume.  Dude once told me he didn't go to clinics because he already knew everything they would be talking about.  He was constantly taking a very simple idea and finding ways to make overly complicated and confusing to the kids so he'd seem smart, then blaming their "low football IQ" on his own failings as a coach.

A HS near me hired an NFL veteran straight from his playing days a year ago.  Dude had a 10 year career himself and was a freak athlete.  When he got hired he bragged about how he decided he was going to coach after his playing days were done, so he really studied the NFL schemes very closely his last couple of years there and was going to make everything just like the NFL.

As soon as he was hired, he was saying condescending things about the community and the school, then he was a guest on a local sports radio show a week before the season started and didn't even know the names of any "players to watch."  Then he kept whining about how the team had no money and he was paying for stuff out of pocket even though he'd done almost no fundraising.  He whined about how terrible his assistant coaches were.  He even humiliated his whole team in games by making them stand on the sideline while the other team scored a 2 pt conversion because he was mad they'd given up a TD, then he punished the whole team by making them roll the field during pregame warmups over something silly.  His tenure barely lasted 7 games before he imploded because of a bunch of drama, lunacy, and entitlement that was simply unbelievable, which he took to his 100,000 Twitter followers himself.