Author Topic: Middle School: Air Raid Offense  (Read 1016 times)

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Offline blockandtackle

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Re: Middle School: Air Raid Offense
« Reply #15 on: January 14, 2019, 03:19:28 PM »
How many QB should you train if you are going to go full Air Raid?

I would think you'd want at least 2 and preferably 3+, if for no other reason than to have the extra arms to throw routes in practice and get the WRs work playing pitch and catch.

Those backup QBs may need to play another position in games, though--preferably a defensive one so they can spend all their offensive time at QB.

Offline chucknduck

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Re: Middle School: Air Raid Offense
« Reply #16 on: January 14, 2019, 03:55:24 PM »
If you use the Air Raid drills, you need at least three.  Routes on Air is probably my favorite drill for the skill guys.  My third string receivers know the routes just as well as the first string guys.  That drill gets every single kid a ton of reps.  You got five guys throwing, usually three qb's and two coaches, and five kids catching a ball every ten seconds or so.  It doesn't get much better than that.

Offline Dusty Ol Fart

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Re: Middle School: Air Raid Offense
« Reply #17 on: January 14, 2019, 04:42:42 PM »
Just going to put this out there for consumption.  Remember we are talking Junior Football with many of us having a minimal staff at best.  I am lucky to have someone to work the receivers while I drill the QB's.  More often than not its me, the QB's and Receivers.  I fully agree that a typical High School staff of 4-8 Coaches can get a whole lot more accomplished. 

Using us as an example. 2 Footballs, 1 QB, 7-10 "Receivers"  All run Hitch then switch to Slant, Then Fade.  Swap QB and Repeat drill.  I try to get that done in a 20 Minute segment.  More receivers means I can go left and right without waiting for them to get back in line.  I am emphatic about the number of Steps (Not Yards) they take.  I am emphatic that they sell their moves.  Being Mindful that our highest percentage throws are the Quick  Hitch and Slants.  With the QB I stress getting the ball up to their Cheek, Adjust the feet, and throw!  We are at Pistol Depth so its already a 3 step drop.   As I said in an earlier post, finding a couple kids who can catch the ball over 70% of the time is paramount to getting the desired "Extended Run Effect" from a Quick Passing Game.  Add in the Screens and there is the understanding that receivers cannot comeback too far or its a Lateral Pass.  Can you run it?  Absolutely!  Just be very mindful of your players and their abilities.  If not, you will pull your hair out wondering why you aren't getting the results that Mike Leach or some of the guys positing responses here are getting from the same or similar offenses. 

Feed em as much as they can execute well. 

jmho
 ;)
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Offline chucknduck

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Re: Middle School: Air Raid Offense
« Reply #18 on: January 14, 2019, 06:07:57 PM »
If you want to practice like an Air Raid team, you need five footballs, preferably ten.  The Air Raid does not really have any unique plays that other teams do not have.  It just has a fraction of the plays that most teams have.  The bare minimum to get by.  It is all about execution, not x's and o's.

Offline morris

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Re: Middle School: Air Raid Offense
« Reply #19 on: January 14, 2019, 06:56:00 PM »
As far as number of QBs you need two. They don’t have to be the same type of QB.

Routes on air: you can do it with two QBs. If you have to you can do it with 1 with tempo. The less QBs you have just means not everyone is running the routes at the same time. Many HS teams can’t run ROA like Mumme and the rest of the guys did.

You don’t have to run all the Air Raid drills. You don’t have to run any of them. You just need to be efficient in how and what you practice.

I coached our offense this last year with 2-3 coaches. Two years ago I coached it with 2 though it was tough and I had to get creative.

Offline chucknduck

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Re: Middle School: Air Raid Offense
« Reply #20 on: January 14, 2019, 07:59:36 PM »
Of course you don't have to use the drills, you don't have to use anything.  But if the OP is just learning the offense, why would you disregard the drills?  The way the offense is practiced is more important than the actual plays.  I'm sure he will have to discard some things from the offense to fit his team, but I would not discard the drills.  At least, not too many of them.

Offline morris

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Re: Middle School: Air Raid Offense
« Reply #21 on: January 14, 2019, 09:11:00 PM »
If he wants to use the drills great. If not there are plenty of ways to practice it and be successful. Some people get caught up in the drills that they lose sight of what they are trying to accomplish. Not all the drills fit every QB and what you need him to do. Some of the drills would need to be modified. Then you have to figure out if modifying them is the best answer or using a different drill.

We used pat n go. We’ve used ROA at times. We’ve used Mumme’s Surge drill some. One of Mumme’s best drills uses a tennis ball to teach reads. We don’t use many of the typical Air Raid drills.

The big thing for them was to throw the ball a lot during practice and to catch the ball a lot. The reads and everything can be taught and practiced in chunks.

Offline chucknduck

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Re: Middle School: Air Raid Offense
« Reply #22 on: January 14, 2019, 10:06:29 PM »
Ok, I get what you're saying.

Offline blockandtackle

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Re: Middle School: Air Raid Offense
« Reply #23 on: January 15, 2019, 08:53:37 AM »
If you use the Air Raid drills, you need at least three.  Routes on Air is probably my favorite drill for the skill guys.  My third string receivers know the routes just as well as the first string guys.  That drill gets every single kid a ton of reps.  You got five guys throwing, usually three qb's and two coaches, and five kids catching a ball every ten seconds or so.  It doesn't get much better than that.

One tweak that you could use with a MS or youth Air Raid offense would be turn it into 1/2 field reads--2-3 arms throwing 2-3 balls to 2-3 receivers.  That would help overcome the personnel issue here but still use routes on air.

My first year of coaching HS ball, I went to a pass-first team who'd typically throw around 35 times a game.  Our practice was pretty simple: we'd run what amounted to pat'n'go (we just called it "routes") where we'd start each practice with 2 QBs and 2 lines of receivers running through our core routes: hitch, slant, out, fade, streak.  One QB would throw them to the left, the other would throw them to the right, then the receivers would loop around and rotate to the other line after their rep.  We'd either rotate QBs halfway through the drill or have them switch sides the next day.  It worked very well and helped them get a ton of reps on these throws and catches.

We didn't do a full "routes on air" thing, but we'd do pass skelly, then a "pass emphasis" period for 10-15 min before going to individual work on run game and back for a "run emphasis" Team O for another 10-15 min.

Offline Dusty Ol Fart

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Re: Middle School: Air Raid Offense
« Reply #24 on: January 15, 2019, 10:36:29 AM »
[The big thing for them was to throw the ball a lot during practice and to catch the ball a lot. The reads and everything can be taught and practiced in chunks./b]

THIS ^^^^^^  2 things here, it tells you which QB gives you the advantage, accuracy and release, and who can Catch. I wholeheartedly agree, you can build your file of Routes / Reads from there.     
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Offline blockandtackle

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Re: Middle School: Air Raid Offense
« Reply #25 on: January 15, 2019, 11:34:21 AM »
If he wants to use the drills great. If not there are plenty of ways to practice it and be successful. Some people get caught up in the drills that they lose sight of what they are trying to accomplish. Not all the drills fit every QB and what you need him to do. Some of the drills would need to be modified. Then you have to figure out if modifying them is the best answer or using a different drill.

We used pat n go. We’ve used ROA at times. We’ve used Mumme’s Surge drill some. One of Mumme’s best drills uses a tennis ball to teach reads. We don’t use many of the typical Air Raid drills.

The big thing for them was to throw the ball a lot during practice and to catch the ball a lot. The reads and everything can be taught and practiced in chunks.

Great points.

Could you explain the "Surge drill" and the tennis ball read drill a little more?

Offline blockandtackle

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Re: Middle School: Air Raid Offense
« Reply #26 on: January 15, 2019, 11:43:48 AM »
[The big thing for them was to throw the ball a lot during practice and to catch the ball a lot. The reads and everything can be taught and practiced in chunks./b]

THIS ^^^^^^  2 things here, it tells you which QB gives you the advantage, accuracy and release, and who can Catch. I wholeheartedly agree, you can build your file of Routes / Reads from there.   

That's part of it, but I think Morris also means that the more you throw and catch the ball, the better you're going to get at it.  A lot of it is simply hand-eye coordination.

I know of teams who only work throwing the ball for like 10 minutes once a week and absolutely suck at it, then they say they can't throw because they don't get kids who can throw or catch.

That's really no different from hearing a coach complain about how his OL always sucks so he can never run the ball.  These are all skills that need to be taught and practiced to develop.

I an old article by a coach who'd played in Red Faught's run'n'shoot offense at Georgetown College in the early 90s.  Faught was the OC and, prior to him getting there, they'd been a true wishbone team.  The HC wanted to keep the triple option, so they became sort of a Flexbone team with a pass emphasis.  They still spent most of their practice time on the option, but in the offseason and pre-practice the QBs and receivers would just get together to play pitch and catch.  Worked well enough to win the NC at the NAIA level, which no other RNS team ever did.

Offline morris

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Re: Middle School: Air Raid Offense
« Reply #27 on: January 15, 2019, 12:36:05 PM »
You’re correct that is what I meant. If you want to get good at throwing the ball then do it a lot. That’s what Mumme and the Air Raid guys did. That’s kind of what we do. In fact our practice starts very much like what blockandtackle described.

Surge drill (they don’t call it this anymore) came from Mumme visiting the Sacramento Surge from the WFL. It’s the drill where you set the ball on the hash and say the 10. You run a play then you go to the 15 or 20 in the middle of the field and then move to the next hash. You keep going all the way down the field. Hash, Middle, hash.

The tennis ball drill has the WR walking or going 3/4 speed. The QB throws a tennis ball to the WR. It allows the QB to concentrate on reads. Patrick Taylor on twitter describes it better.

Offline chucknduck

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Re: Middle School: Air Raid Offense
« Reply #28 on: January 15, 2019, 06:25:29 PM »
https://youtu.be/SLNHTeWo46I

Air Raid Quick Game Clinic.

Offline morris

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Re: Middle School: Air Raid Offense
« Reply #29 on: January 15, 2019, 06:59:13 PM »
https://youtu.be/SLNHTeWo46I

Air Raid Quick Game Clinic.
He has a whole series of videos on running the Air Raid at the MS level. He does a very good job of keeping things simple and explaining things. I mentioned him in my earlier post. He is on twitter and you can reach him through email.  He is very helpful. His videos are a great place to start or base out of for a MS program.