Author Topic: H-back blocking technique  (Read 6399 times)

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Offline Vince148

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H-back blocking technique
« on: February 07, 2014, 03:43:28 PM »
When an H-back is in motion and has to block OZ across the formation, is there any special technique or footwork that he uses?

Offline ZACH

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Re: H-back blocking technique
« Reply #1 on: February 07, 2014, 05:03:52 PM »
When an H-back is in motion and has to block OZ across the formation, is there any special technique or footwork that he uses?

Here some diagrams from a playbook not sure if they came from Bill Mountjoy none the less they have descriptions

I have more then this one just gotta dig deeper.

If we are adding him to the playside...when he starts to shuffle we tell him to attack the edge defender or nearest second level man near the te.

If we scouted and we pre determined who #4 is in a defensive set we want him to use the same footwork as if hes is a 3 or still position attack the v of the neck and get in the pads. Step with playside foot first and so on.
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Offline Pearls of Wisdom

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Re: H-back blocking technique
« Reply #2 on: February 07, 2014, 05:13:41 PM »
When an H-back is in motion and has to block OZ across the formation, is there any special technique or footwork that he uses?


We ONLY do that IF we want him blocking #4 (usually the WR's man who is S/S or MDM from secondary) then "H" uses the REACH BLOCK:

REACH:
A)    Lead step with near (outs.) foot.
B)    Aim hat thru outside #.
C)    Get the second step down for power (split the crotch of defender).
C)    Engage and square up.  Inside hand = "CATCH hand" (a boxing left hook under the defender's flipper beneath his inside arm pit), & outside hand under outside #.
D)    Third step outside defender’s shoe.
E)     Sustain.



« Last Edit: February 08, 2014, 01:48:14 PM by billmountjoy »
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Offline ZACH

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Re: H-back blocking technique
« Reply #3 on: February 07, 2014, 05:15:52 PM »
A bill mountjoy attachment. See 60/70 gash hes not in motion but he starts right where you'd want him to if in motion
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Offline Pearls of Wisdom

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Re: H-back blocking technique
« Reply #4 on: February 07, 2014, 06:14:36 PM »
A bill mountjoy attachment. See 60/70 gash hes not in motion but he starts right where you'd want him to if in motion


He CAN "chip" #3 but HIS assignment is #4 (generally MDM from seconadry).  TE has #3.
« Last Edit: February 07, 2014, 06:25:44 PM by billmountjoy »
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Offline Vince148

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Re: H-back blocking technique
« Reply #5 on: February 08, 2014, 08:24:35 AM »

We ONLY do that IF we want him blocking #4 (usually the WR's man who is S/S or MDM from secondary) then "H" uses the REACH BLOCK:

REACH:
A)   Lead step with near foot.
B)   Aim hat thru outside #.
C)    Get the second step down for power (split the crotch of defender).
C)    Engage and square up.  Inside hand = "CATCH hand" (a boxing left hook under the defender's flipper), & outside hand under outside #.
D)    Third step outside defender’s shoe.
E)     Sustain.
Same if he starts in trips and motions back to the open side to get #3?

Offline Pearls of Wisdom

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Re: H-back blocking technique
« Reply #6 on: February 08, 2014, 11:26:32 AM »
Same if he starts in trips and motions back to the open side to get #3?


"H" can align ANYWHERE, & motion ANYWHERE.  His blocking rule is #3. 

#4 play-side (usually a S/S) normally belongs to the WR ("MOST DANGEROUR MAN" coming down from the secondary on primary run force).  If for any reason we want "H" to block him (game by game decision DEPENDING on align & play of #4)= "H" can get to him thru EITHER align or motion  ("Reach" block technique on OZ).  Much of your motion comes from moving your “H” from one side to the other.  The movement creates problems for the defense in that they must determine how to support the corner of the defense and at the same time account for coverage on each receiver.
NOTE:  If you CHOOSE to have "H" block #4, Z then blocks #5.  All this is VERY ELEMENTARY!

EXAMPLE (H can be in Double OR Trips):
-----------------------------------------------------5
----------------------------------1----1--------4
----------------------------3--2----0--- 2--3
X------------------------------O-O-C-O-O-O
----------------------------H-------O--------------Z

------------------------------------R

As to any OTHER defenses = check sheet I have posted below (#4 is always the NEXT thing outside #3):
« Last Edit: February 08, 2014, 03:03:17 PM by billmountjoy »
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Offline Pearls of Wisdom

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Re: H-back blocking technique
« Reply #7 on: February 08, 2014, 02:26:21 PM »
SEE ABOVE POST FIRST:

PS:  Here are the motions we use for "H" (ATTACHED):
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Offline Vince148

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Re: H-back blocking technique
« Reply #8 on: February 08, 2014, 06:54:14 PM »
I've been watching film of different teams running OZ. Some will line up in a double tight with both WRs to the same side, then run OZ to the TE only side. Alex Gibbs says that he likes his WRs to push the corner but block the safety. If I were to run the aforementioned formation, I would be looking at a 9 tech DE and a CB about 5 yards outside of him playing about 2 yards back to LBer depth. This would be away from the trips side. But the 2 WRs on the trips side would probably draw the FS over. Something like this is what we would see. Is it advisable to run OZ away from the trips side with the thinking that the RB probably only has to beat a weak corner?
...................................F


..................B...........................B
...C......................................................................C
..............................V.......V..V......V..V......V
...................................H..T..G..C..G..T..Y
...X.............Z...........................Q

...............................................R

Offline Michael

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Re: H-back blocking technique
« Reply #9 on: February 08, 2014, 09:30:00 PM »
I've been watching film of different teams running OZ. Some will line up in a double tight with both WRs to the same side, then run OZ to the TE only side. Alex Gibbs says that he likes his WRs to push the corner but block the safety. If I were to run the aforementioned formation, I would be looking at a 9 tech DE and a CB about 5 yards outside of him playing about 2 yards back to LBer depth. This would be away from the trips side. But the 2 WRs on the trips side would probably draw the FS over. Something like this is what we would see. Is it advisable to run OZ away from the trips side with the thinking that the RB probably only has to beat a weak corner?
...................................F


..................B...........................B
...C......................................................................C
..............................V.......V..V......V..V......V
...................................H..T..G..C..G..T..Y
...X.............Z...........................Q

...............................................R

How outside is your OZ?

On a two-wide receiver side, Gibbs (at least based on what I heard him say) has the WRs block the men over them.

The conversation went like this:

Gibbs: The wide receivers block the safeties.
Coach: What if you have two WRs on the same side?
Gibbs: They each block the man over them.
Coach: What if one of them doesn't have a man over them?
Gibbs: Then we throw him the f___ing football.
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Offline Pearls of Wisdom

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Re: H-back blocking technique
« Reply #10 on: February 08, 2014, 10:17:51 PM »
I've been watching film of different teams running OZ. Some will line up in a double tight with both WRs to the same side, then run OZ to the TE only side. Alex Gibbs says that he likes his WRs to push the corner but block the safety. If I were to run the aforementioned formation, I would be looking at a 9 tech DE and a CB about 5 yards outside of him playing about 2 yards back to LBer depth. This would be away from the trips side. But the 2 WRs on the trips side would probably draw the FS over. Something like this is what we would see. Is it advisable to run OZ away from the trips side with the thinking that the RB probably only has to beat a weak corner?
...................................F


..................B...........................B
...C......................................................................C
..............................V.......V..V......V..V......V
...................................H..T..G..C..G..T..Y
...X.............Z...........................Q

...............................................R


Corner PROBABLY can get up too quick.  I like A Gibbs thinking of running it to both the TE & SE side (if numbers permit), but in running it to the SE side you can PUSH the Corner & CRACK the Safety.

OUR thinking is to (we do not go beyond this thinking on OZ):

A)   LINE UP in Double OR Trips, & see where secondary run force is (run AWAY from S/S).  On BOTH of these "H" may be 18" out or 5+ yds out (depends on defense's ADJUSTMENTS).

B)   MOTION  "H" from Double to Trips (& VICE VERSE) & see how they REACT (run AWAY from S/S).

C)   About the only time we run the play AWAY from a WR is from this set (if they put the S/S to X & Z side to stop the pass).  NOW we have "H" to block the Corner (#4) to the right (if S/S on OTHER side).
NOTE:  This set makes it PARTICULARLY difficulty for them to declare the location of S/S (if he goes to the side of H & Y = pass combos to X & Z are HARD TO STOP).

X--------------------O-O-C-O-O-Y
---------Z----------------Q--------H (18" out from Y & 1 yard deep)

--------------------------R

NOTE:  There are no OTHER considerations for us in running this play!  We have so many motions & formations available to us that the possibilities are ENDLESS.
« Last Edit: February 09, 2014, 10:43:00 AM by billmountjoy »
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Offline ZACH

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Re: H-back blocking technique
« Reply #11 on: February 09, 2014, 11:10:13 PM »
Gibbs has said in clips ive seen single receiver push crack. 2 wr same side its stalk blocking.

No block no rock
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Offline Michael

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Re: H-back blocking technique
« Reply #12 on: February 09, 2014, 11:30:35 PM »
I saw him say they got rid of some WRs after his first year in Denver because they didn't want to block.
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Offline ZACH

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Re: H-back blocking technique
« Reply #13 on: February 10, 2014, 08:50:11 AM »
Vince your diagram (we now call unit left) we ran wide to both sides. What I will remind you is vs 9 tech there probably wont be a bounce unless the end pinches...or your te can man handle him. In this situation its advantageous for you not to bounce. The ball will most likely hit the bubble around tackle which is great so the corner in that scenario if making the tackle will for a 7+ yard gain.

The other way to look at this is play action...if the corner is tackling your rb on wide zone to that side hes probably now programmed to get sucked in on that action again.  Pop it right where he was or should be.

Another bit from a Gibbs clinic "we make corner tackles, bc theyre probably as shitty tacklers in your league as they are in ours  "

 
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Offline Pearls of Wisdom

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Re: H-back blocking technique
« Reply #14 on: February 15, 2014, 02:17:36 PM »
ABOUT "H" BACKS:

Joe Gibbs innovates his guts out

By Skin Patrol on May 29 2007, 2:03p +

The H-back is replacing the Fullback on offense.
The conventional fullback has slowly been replaced by the H-back on offense. The H-back, a hybrid tight end/fullback, was originally brought to prominence by Joe Gibbs during his first tour of duty with the Washington Redskins in the 1980s. But more teams have been using the H-back as part of multiple tight end sets to keep defenses guessing.

Because an H-back lines up in the backfield or along the line and is used in motion, teams can show multiple formations without changing personnel. On one play, the H-back can line up in the backfield and be a lead blocker on power running plays. On the next, he can line up on the line and play the role of a conventional tight end as a blocker or receiver. But he generally is used as a motion player in the backfield. Regardless of where he lines up, the H-back's athleticism and receiving skills pose a major problem for defenses.

Washington's Chris Cooley is the perfect example of the modern H-back. He has the speed and athleticism to be a major threat in the passing game, but is also powerful enough to be an effective lead blocker on running plays. He allows them to present several different looks out of their base personnel group.
None of this is new to Redskins fans, and is repeated here only because it speaks to a narrative that I'm all too happy to support: that Joe Gibbs is a coaching genius responsible for changing the game more than his peers. The Colts changed from a 3 WR set to a 2 WR set w/ an H-Back, in response to Brandon Stokley going down to injury. They won the Super Bowl, by the way.

Another of Gibbs' widely adopted innovations is the two tight end set, which he used to combat Lawrence Taylor's freakish ability to get after opposing quarterbacks. Joe Theismann knows what I'm talking about.

****************************************************************************************

NFL Draft 2013: Breaking down the H-backs

By Danny Kelly @fieldgulls on Apr 11 2013, 3:13p 19
Randy Sartin-US PRESSWIRE


The H-back, a combination of tight end and fullback, is an important part of the NFL game plan. Which players in the draft could help offenses with their combined abilities as a blocker and receiver?
Tweet (15) Share (5) Share 19 Comments Rec 3

The 2013 NFL Draft is only weeks away. By now, you've probably read all there is to read on the first- and second-round type prospects so instead of adding to the chorus on that, let's focus on some mid- to late-round types. I'm now in the midst of a mini-series on some of the so-called "hybrid" positions in emerging in the NFL, so an obvious place to focus is on the H-back -- a position whose name is the abbreviated form of "Hybrid Back."

As SportsOnEarth's Mike Tanier explained:

The modern two-tight end set was developed by Joe Gibbs and his Redskins staff in the early 1980s. It was created as a countermeasure against 3-4 defenses in general and Lawrence Taylor in particular. Gibbs discovered that an extra tight end on the line of scrimmage was in better position than a fullback to stop Taylor and other elite blitzers. It also forced Taylor to align wider, thus lengthening the distance between him and the quarterback.

Gibbs soon learned to use the second tight end as an all-purpose blocker: That extra tight end (usually Don Warren, back in the day) might go in motion before the snap to unbalance the offensive line, or he might slip into the backfield as a fullback or sneak into pass patterns.

The modern H-back was born.

The H-back is a moveable chess piece, as Greg Cosell likes to say, and their versatile nature can be used to disguise schemes, alter formations, and confuse defenses by moving them into different positions from snap to snap and asking them to perform a wide range of duties in any given series.

"An H-back has to have good hands and be super smart."-Joe Gibbs


From the originator, Joe Gibbs himself, "An H-back has to have good hands and be super smart," Gibbs explained. "They give you a lot of opportunities for changes in formations. If you notice, good football teams do it because it's a different complication for the defense."

A thinking defense is a slow-reacting defense. When you're sitting there worrying about a guy that you normally wouldn't worry about all that much - the fullback - that's an advantage to the offense.

Last week, I wrote about a very similar subject - the "joker" tight end, and truth be told, there's no real way of disambiguating the 'H-back' from the 'Joker' and there's no real definition for either. They're exceedingly similar positions and most people probably list them as one and the same. I won't try to convince you that there's any need to separate the two. However, when writing about potential prospects for the NFL Draft, it's probably best to have a more specific role in mind for a player so here's the way that I thought about it when setting out with this analysis:

The "Joker" tight end is a hybrid wide receiver/tight end. The "H-back" is a hybrid tight end/fullback.

There's still plenty of subjectivity therein, but that's how I pictured it. It might be similar to projecting "X" receivers from "Slot" receivers -- one position, some overlap, but different types of prospects in general.
Development of the Joker TE and H-back Position

As I wrote last week, the hybridization of NFL player positions is one of the most interesting evolutions of the modern game, and that's why I've focused on some of these 'tweener' types. One of the most celebrated hybrid positions in the changing NFL has been the joker tight end. The creation of this new position was centered around a really basic fundamental idea: using the tight end, historically a de facto offensive lineman, as a dynamic pass catcher.

Don Coryell, the legendary coach of the Chargers from 1978-1986, turned to then-offensive coordinator Joe Gibbs and future Hall of Fame TE Kellen Winslow to develop this idea, and Winslow was the first in what's become a growing group of big, insanely athletic, and versatile players at that position. As Al Saunders recollects in Ron Jaworski and Greg Cosell's book, The Games That Changed the Game:

"You have to understand how tight ends were being used in the early 1980s. Their primary function was as a blocker, then to move out to the back side as part of the route and run a drag route. Or they'd run hooks inside, or get open in the flat. That was it. They were all big guys, 'tackles' who could catch the football. Plus, outside linebackers could still grab a guy and smack him around trying to defend the run."

It pained offensive coordinator Joe Gibbs to see Winslow's talent being held back by the traditional limits of the position. "When we lined him up at the standard tight end spot and he went to release, he got pounded by the outside linebacker in a 4-3 or the inside linebacker in a 3-4," he recalled. "He had a tough time getting off clean, and we felt we had to do something. So Ernie, Don, our O-line coach, Jim Hanifan, and I said to ourselves, 'Maybe the thing to do is take him off that line of scrimmage and start moving him all over the place.'"

As Winslow recollects, "We just started playing around with it. Our coaches saw something, and so I ended up in practice running the same routes as the wide receivers. I loved running those routes, the 'skinny post,' the 'deep post'-- and there weren't many guys then at six-five, 245 who could run these traditional wideout routes. When you looked at the film, I ran the routes about as well as the wide receivers, although I was usually a step or two behind where they were."

In Jaworski's words: "What Coryell and receivers coach Ernie Zampese did with Winslow was to take a player with extraordinary pass-catching ability and create positions in which he could be the primary receiver."

Of course, after leaving San Diego and taking the reins in Washington, Gibbs further innovated the tight end position and the Winslow WR/TE hyrbrid was joined by the FB/TE hybrid as a way to better protect quarterbacks from the unequalled scariness that was one Lawrence Taylor. It's fascinating that Gibbs had such a big part in the development of two distinct off-shoot positions -- the joker tight end (WR/TE hybrid) and the H-back (TE/FB) hybrid.
The Modern Fullback

In the modern NFL, the fullback position has become somewhat an afterthought -- teams favor three- or four-receiver, one-back sets these days and the use of a lead-blocker has diminished greatly. One possible reason for this is that a traditional lead-blocking fullback is fairly one-dimensional - not dangerous with the ball in his hands, not dangerous in the passing game, simply used to take on a linebacker at the second level, pass protect, or to lay a path for the running back or run one yard on a dive for a first down. Those are important jobs for some teams and there's always going to be something timeless about a hulking, huge-neck-roll wearing fullback crashing into their defensive counterparts in middle linebackers, but the reality is that the position isn't highly valued anymore. The highest ranked fullback in most draft grading systems is a third- or fourth-round prospect.

Some teams have eliminated the position from their playbook entirely and some have refined the type of athlete they prefer at that spot. For the purpose of this exercise, let's talk about the modern utilization of the fullback position.

I study the Seahawks closely, so I'll use them as an example. Their dedicated fullback in 2012 was a former Penn State quarterback and Big-10 Player of the Year in 2005, Michael Robinson, and he served as a jack of all trades on special teams and with the offense.

"H-backs give you a lot of opportunities for changes in formations. If you notice, good football teams do it because it's a different complication for the defense." -Joe Gibbs

Robinson uses a two-point stance and height advantage (he's 6'1, taller than most NFL RBs) as a way to note alignments, splits, movement and all that pre-and-post snap stuff to best recognize where he should lay out his lead block, to "see the defense like the runner sees the defense." It also helps a ton that Robinson played quarterback at Penn State, as he's been schooled in recognizing defenses and knowing where their weaknesses should lie, schematically. It's the 'football IQ' part of the game.

This takes you back to Gibbs' description of the modern H-back: "An H-back has to have good hands and be super smart."

Seahawks Pro-Bowl running back Marshawn Lynch refers to Robinson as 'his eyes' and has noted that he trusts Mike Rob to help lead him to daylight. As Robinson puts it - "you read it like a runner - that's why he calls me his 'eyes', because we're supposed to see the same thing."

They're not only supposed to see the same thing, they're supposed to do the same thing - and in the Seahawks zone-blocking run game, Robinson is often tasked with leading Lynch to the correct crease and picking up a defender that tries to fill it.

So, there's a distinction -- the H-back of the new generation that I envision can't just be an undersized tight end like Aaron Hernandez -- he must enjoy blocking and doing the dirty work as well. Not many people want to go head to head with someone like Patrick Willis.

Also important to Robinson's job description though is to be a dependable outlet receiver for QB Russell Wilson, and one play we saw Seattle run time and time again during the season, with very little trouble, was some variation on a play-action fake handoff to Marshawn Lynch.

"Gibbs' idea," was get a mobile big man, put him in motion behind the line and call him an H-back. He could get a running start on his block, he could fake the block and be a receiver, or he could be a decoy who took a linebacker or safety with him while the play went the other way."

The beauty of Gibbs' offense was its simplicity. It featured three basic running plays, four passing plays and hundreds of formations and shifts designed to disguise the play.
Until Gibbs retired after the 1992 season, the Redskins' offense was the creation of an offensive coach's mind.



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