Author Topic: Defending the UBSW Offense  (Read 158368 times)

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Offline Shamrocks

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Re: Defending the UBSW Offense
« Reply #405 on: June 17, 2014, 01:28:03 PM »
We have run the UBSW and as a DC, I never understood why teams never adjusted their D to the UBSW.  We always had more O players on the strong side of the ball, more players at the point of attack than the D and so on.  I was always confused to why no one ever adjusted except for a few over time.  These have to be a few reasons why no one adjusted:

1) They were terrible scouts
2) They did not teach their DEs/LBs to read and react or D line to shift
3) During the games their coaches, looking from the sidelines, not in back or front of the formation, never even realized we were unbalanced. 

Even better, when teams noticed we were unbalanced, we would casually shift it to the other side and again, they never picked up on our switch.  It was like a chess match but boy did I know I had the upper hand. 

When teams caught on and we were outmatched size, slkill and speed wise, we then would throw a quick Spread DW and they would be completely confused.   

Offline davecisar

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Re: Defending the UBSW Offense
« Reply #406 on: June 17, 2014, 01:36:43 PM »
Coach,

That isn't the case here for us
Everyone has my materials- so they usually shift over
When we flip, they flip

You are right, it can be a little tough to see from the sidelines. In tournaments- game 1 at least we may get away with it in the first game.

However Im a big fan of formationing- like you
Im rarely, let me rephrase that- never- in the same formation the entire game
I like to run few plays- lots of formations and adjustments

Formationing makes a defense respond quickly ( we are no-huddle)
Can get you into better angles, numbers advantages and better matchups- always been a fan of it
However beautiful the strategy, you should occasionally look at the results.

Winston Churchill

Offline Shamrocks

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Re: Defending the UBSW Offense
« Reply #407 on: June 17, 2014, 01:53:44 PM »
Coach,

That isn't the case here for us
Everyone has my materials- so they usually shift over
When we flip, they flip

You are right, it can be a little tough to see from the sidelines. In tournaments- game 1 at least we may get away with it in the first game.

However Im a big fan of formationing- like you
Im rarely, let me rephrase that- never- in the same formation the entire game
I like to run few plays- lots of formations and adjustments

Formationing makes a defense respond quickly ( we are no-huddle)
Can get you into better angles, numbers advantages and better matchups- always been a fan of it

When we have some issues for whatever reason on O, the no huddle seems to solve and frustrate the other players and for sure their coaches.  It crazy, in one game where we killed a team they were putting 7-8 guys on one side and when we flipped, they never flipped!!     It was a great game to get all the kids some carries for sure... 

Offline mahonz

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Re: Defending the UBSW Offense
« Reply #408 on: June 17, 2014, 02:16:44 PM »
We have run the UBSW and as a DC, I never understood why teams never adjusted their D to the UBSW.  We always had more O players on the strong side of the ball, more players at the point of attack than the D and so on.  I was always confused to why no one ever adjusted except for a few over time.  These have to be a few reasons why no one adjusted:

1) They were terrible scouts
2) They did not teach their DEs/LBs to read and react or D line to shift
3) During the games their coaches, looking from the sidelines, not in back or front of the formation, never even realized we were unbalanced. 

Even better, when teams noticed we were unbalanced, we would casually shift it to the other side and again, they never picked up on our switch.  It was like a chess match but boy did I know I had the upper hand. 

When teams caught on and we were outmatched size, slkill and speed wise, we then would throw a quick Spread DW and they would be completely confused.   

S

I think your post speaks more about the norms of youth football especially at the younger age groups.

We have our NG count and even that takes some time for the little guys to understand. Formation recognition is really only understood as they become more experienced. 

Advantage UBSW.
What is beautiful, lives forever.

Offline davecisar

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Re: Defending the UBSW Offense
« Reply #409 on: June 17, 2014, 03:39:29 PM »
We call out the formation from the sidelines
Any unbalanced announcement is the job of the DT coach-the way we have it divided up
One year at I think 5-6 grade every team we played lined up unbalanced for at least a single play

As to rolling the ball- weve never suggested that
Ive never coached anyone in real life under 6 and only coached 6s one year
I have coached a bunch of 7 year olds though and never had any issues teaching the snap
Maybe like Jack said- its like the passing game- it goes to commitment and coaching  ;D

At 5-6 years old I'm not sure it matters a hill of beans
Just make sure they are playing safely, all get in, play a lot and have fun
« Last Edit: June 17, 2014, 03:41:18 PM by davecisar »
However beautiful the strategy, you should occasionally look at the results.

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Offline mahonz

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Re: Defending the UBSW Offense
« Reply #410 on: June 17, 2014, 03:45:31 PM »
We call out the formation from the sidelines
Any unbalanced is the job of the DT coach-the way we have it divided up
One year at I think 5-6 grade every team we played lined up unbalanced for at least a single play

As to rolling the ball- weve never suggested that
Ive never coached anyone in real life under 6 and only coached 6s one year
I have coached a bunch of 7 year olds though and never had any issues teaching the snap
Maybe like Jack said- its like the passing game- it goes to commitment and coaching  ;D

At 5-6 years old I'm not sure it matters a hill of beans
Just make sure they are playing safely, all get in, play a lot and have fun

Dave

Yes the rolling ball was a very unique thing for sure. And effective.

I tried to teach the DL numbering system to the third graders as a means to help them understand alignments. Rocket science. They began to understand it fully last season so now we can call out numbers. Given a second chance I'd press them harder to learn the DL numbering system.
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Offline davecisar

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Re: Defending the UBSW Offense
« Reply #411 on: June 17, 2014, 03:53:50 PM »
"Coach" Mike

Whatever floats your boat

We practice 100s of reps of defensive recognition and alignment every week
1 rep every 15 secs 11 in 11 out. One of the things we make very few mistakes with
IMO alignment is like effort, paying attention and attitude- it doesn't take great athletes to align, effort, pay attention and have a great attitude. We work the heck out of it- both on offense and defense. We have a variety of formations and alignment adjustments both on offense and defense that we use all the way down to age 7-9.

I like to use words that the kids can correlate to a picture in their minds
If numbers work for you- good deal

We have our base alignment- then we have calls to come off of it- very simple- small adjustments

Unbalanced- is just "shift"- left or right
"Squeeze"- changed DT alignments- and LB- they switch gaps
So on and so forth
However beautiful the strategy, you should occasionally look at the results.

Winston Churchill

Offline mahonz

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Re: Defending the UBSW Offense
« Reply #412 on: June 17, 2014, 04:04:05 PM »
"Coach" Mike

Whatever floats your boat

We practice 100s of reps of defensive recognition and alignment every week
1 rep every 15 secs 11 in 11 out. One of the things we make very few mistakes with
IMO alignment is like effort, paying attention and attitude- it doesn't take great athletes to align, effort, pay attention and have a great attitude. We work the heck out of it- both on offense and defense. We have a variety of formations and alignment adjustments both on offense and defense that we use all the way down to age 7-9.

I like to use words that the kids can correlate to a picture in their minds
If numbers work for you- good deal

We have our base alignment- then we have calls to come off of it- very simple- small adjustments

Unbalanced- is just "shift"- left or right
"Squeeze"- changed DT alignments- and LB- they switch gaps
So on and so forth

LOL...if you ever met our NG it would make more sense.  :)
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Offline JrTitan

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Re: Defending the UBSW Offense
« Reply #413 on: June 17, 2014, 09:31:34 PM »
When we see defenses like this we will run some of our base plays right out of the playbook like 14 Power and 14 Trap
However we will also use some tags and formation adjustments

The two plays I like are the Reverse and Trap. These are two well designed plays and can hurt the Split 4-4 if the weakside end, Rover and Will overplay the power, sweep, wedge etc. to the strong side.  They weakside must be disciplined.  WILL and ROVER are on a bit of an island vs. the trap:




REVERSE
  • WEAK END:  On flow away, his head must look inside before getting any deeper than the heels of the EMLOS.  Look for any kick-out block by the BB or lineman pulling inside out. Squeeze the counter inside by adjusting charge angle down the line of scrimmage –look for pulling lineman and squeeze the kick out block keeping outside arm and leg free – do not spill the kick-out.   Do not turn shoulders inside.  Look for the play to bounce outside
  • WILL:  Read step to B gap.  On flow away, cross key BB and follow him to the hole.  Be ready to take the B gap if you can make a play otherwise fit inside the weakside end (C gap).  Attack any lead block in the hole with an inside forearm rip.
  • ROVER: play head up the end.  Do not allow inside release of the end. Cross key BB/WB on flow away looking for any inside pullers coming at you..  Fight pressure and use the ends body to constrict the hole.  Do not go around the block - work across the end's face
  • MIKE: Read step to B gap.  Follow BB/OT under keys.  Scrape weakside B gap looking for cutback.
  • STRONG END:  Play base - maintain contain.  Play the sweep/off-tackle.
  • STRONG CORNER:Play base reading release of TE/WING.  If the wing takes a counter/reverse path, alert with a "COUNTER - COUNTER" call.  Ensure it is not a fake before taking deep cut-off pursuit angle

TRAP
  • ROVER: play head up the end.  Do not allow free release of the end.  Cross key BB/WB looking for inside out pullers coming at you.  Lack of pressure from the end alerts the trap scheme.  Work down the line of scrimmage and squeeze the trapper back into the hole.  Do not turn shoulders inside.  Alternatively p, he can spill the trap and exchange gaps with Will.
  • WILL:  Read step to B gap.  On flow away, cross key BB and follow him to the hole. Read alignment of BB pre-snap.  Anytime he is cheated weak,  beware of trap and alert ROVER.  Fill B gap.  If Rover has closed the gap (spilled the trap), exchange gaps and fill C gap.
  • MIKE: Read step to B gap.  Follow BB under key.   Scrape weakside B gap looking for cutback.  Play the BB under key until it does not work then use OT as underkey.  If you use the OT as the underkey, MIKE cannot help on the trap.
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Offline JrTitan

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Re: Defending the UBSW Offense
« Reply #414 on: June 17, 2014, 10:10:21 PM »
Nice write up

Yes- that is correct- we run 14 power and 14 trap at this- per my discussion with Mike M
That would be step #1



Not sure I have the blocking right.  On the 14 Power or Trap, the 6 tech can either squeeze or spill the kick-out block.  The ILB fills inside if S squeezes it and outside if S spills it (i.e., fill the open window).  S can't allow the veer release of the TE.  He needs to ride the TE inside and blow up the first thing that shows (i.e., block down-step down).  Free safety needs to be active vs. the run.

Whoever executes wins!
"They call it coaching but it is teaching...You do not just tell them...you show them the reasons"

"You have to be smart enough to understand the game, and dumb enough to think it's important."

“…you have no bad habits to break...We either coach it or are allowing allowing it to happen.”

Offline HCScott

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Re: Defending the UBSW Offense
« Reply #415 on: June 18, 2014, 01:40:10 AM »
We don't really "roll the ball back there" I just say that, a lot. I got the saying from a coach back in Michigan who runs the SW similarly.

We do keep it low and the short hops are still great snaps. The defense has no idea where the ball is going or who has it.
"The quarterback must go down and he must go down hard"

Offline davecisar

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Re: Defending the UBSW Offense
« Reply #416 on: June 18, 2014, 06:54:01 AM »
The two plays I like are the Reverse and Trap. These are two well designed plays and can hurt the Split 4-4 if the weakside end, Rover and Will overplay the power, sweep, wedge etc. to the strong side.  They weakside must be disciplined.  WILL and ROVER are on a bit of an island vs. the trap:




REVERSE
  • WEAK END:  On flow away, his head must look inside before getting any deeper than the heels of the EMLOS.  Look for any kick-out block by the BB or lineman pulling inside out. Squeeze the counter inside by adjusting charge angle down the line of scrimmage –look for pulling lineman and squeeze the kick out block keeping outside arm and leg free – do not spill the kick-out.   Do not turn shoulders inside.  Look for the play to bounce outside
  • WILL:  Read step to B gap.  On flow away, cross key BB and follow him to the hole.  Be ready to take the B gap if you can make a play otherwise fit inside the weakside end (C gap).  Attack any lead block in the hole with an inside forearm rip.
  • ROVER: play head up the end.  Do not allow inside release of the end. Cross key BB/WB on flow away looking for any inside pullers coming at you..  Fight pressure and use the ends body to constrict the hole.  Do not go around the block - work across the end's face
  • MIKE: Read step to B gap.  Follow BB/OT under keys.  Scrape weakside B gap looking for cutback.
  • STRONG END:  Play base - maintain contain.  Play the sweep/off-tackle.
  • STRONG CORNER:Play base reading release of TE/WING.  If the wing takes a counter/reverse path, alert with a "COUNTER - COUNTER" call.  Ensure it is not a fake before taking deep cut-off pursuit angle

TRAP
  • ROVER: play head up the end.  Do not allow free release of the end.  Cross key BB/WB looking for inside out pullers coming at you.  Lack of pressure from the end alerts the trap scheme.  Work down the line of scrimmage and squeeze the trapper back into the hole.  Do not turn shoulders inside.  Alternatively p, he can spill the trap and exchange gaps with Will.
  • WILL:  Read step to B gap.  On flow away, cross key BB and follow him to the hole. Read alignment of BB pre-snap.  Anytime he is cheated weak,  beware of trap and alert ROVER.  Fill B gap.  If Rover has closed the gap (spilled the trap), exchange gaps and fill C gap.
  • MIKE: Read step to B gap.  Follow BB under key.   Scrape weakside B gap looking for cutback.  Play the BB under key until it does not work then use OT as underkey.  If you use the OT as the underkey, MIKE cannot help on the trap.

Coach,

Against that specific look I like the BB trap with spinner or mouse action to influence the weakside DE- who is unblocked
While Nebraska can leave that kid unblocked on their QB trap series- we don't have any Tommie Fraziers playing for us- and we have found that DE can sometimes mess that play up for us. In some cases that faking WB may even block the DE if he poses a threat
« Last Edit: June 18, 2014, 06:55:52 AM by davecisar »
However beautiful the strategy, you should occasionally look at the results.

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Offline davecisar

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Re: Defending the UBSW Offense
« Reply #417 on: June 18, 2014, 07:21:43 AM »


Not sure I have the blocking right.  On the 14 Power or Trap, the 6 tech can either squeeze or spill the kick-out block.  The ILB fills inside if S squeezes it and outside if S spills it (i.e., fill the open window).  S can't allow the veer release of the TE.  He needs to ride the TE inside and blow up the first thing that shows (i.e., block down-step down).  Free safety needs to be active vs. the run.

Whoever executes wins!

Coach,

That is true
BTW we call the RB on the left our QB- the RB on right FB- the up back is the BB- and the outside player the WB. Just so we are talking the same language

You don't have the blocking right- but close enough  ;D

Against that approach- similar to the WT6- we would just widen the RTE with our Nasty call-if that S is giving us a bunch of issues with the RTE
We are recessed as much as legally possible- our RTE widens to 2- 3 yards= the S and E widen with him
The RTE blocks out on the E
The WB widens with both and even 1 step wider than normal- spacing to the RTE, The WB blocks C- the E will widen on that release so he can get a piece of the WB

The BB kicks S
The FB and RG run the funnel

We have a double team at the POA on the T and the FB and RG pick up the LBs- the E and C are too wide to make the play and both are blocked
As is the case with many plays- FS is only player who can make the play- he is unblocked and we have to do things to influence him to sit a bit- like throwing the Jump pass off of that look or using Omaha Pass.

Another approach is to just have the WB come under the block of the RTE as he fans the E outside- and have him be one of the lead blockers- while we split the FB out to the right- not too far though. The FB now has the CB- who is too wide to make the play anyways- BUT we now has a pass threat- we can throw on the run as we approach the POA downhill. The pattern is run right at the FS's outside shoulder- inside the C. That may help us hold the FS a bit and make a 6 yard play a 15-20 yard play.  This is our Omaha-Under adjustment- right out of the book.

We started running that the first year we had kids attending the Darrin Slack camp. Has worked pretty well since.

Unlike a lot of SIngle Wing teams- thanks to the influence of Ted Seay, Joe, Jack and others- we like to throw and we never stay in the same formation the entire game.
« Last Edit: June 18, 2014, 08:11:46 AM by davecisar »
However beautiful the strategy, you should occasionally look at the results.

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Offline davecisar

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Re: Defending the UBSW Offense
« Reply #418 on: June 18, 2014, 07:53:11 AM »


Not sure I have the blocking right.  On the 14 Power or Trap, the 6 tech can either squeeze or spill the kick-out block.  The ILB fills inside if S squeezes it and outside if S spills it (i.e., fill the open window).  S can't allow the veer release of the TE.  He needs to ride the TE inside and blow up the first thing that shows (i.e., block down-step down).  Free safety needs to be active vs. the run.

Whoever executes wins!

Coach

Every defense has its strengths and weakness- this defense is pretty good against our traditional out of the box 6 hole power

However I do like the the 14 trap against this- we don't have to block M if he is keying the BB like you said in your write up.  The way you are playing W per your write up- we wouldn't really have to block him either- he is following the BB to the 3 hole as we fake the 43 Counter. Your CB yelling out Counter, Counter with the WBs movement- helps the play. BTW I do the same thing on D when our Cs see counter action away  ;D

The PT comes off free to block any LB that chose not to follow his keys. That is how we have it drawn up in the playbook-

A lot of SW teams will have a power to every hole in their playbook

We added 14 back in maybe 2009-2010

We have experimented a little bit with 12 Power- just like our various Iso plays
With a little more data- then figuring out what we want to remove- it may end up being added to the playbook

As you know we like to scoot our BB in tighter when he takes snaps. SO we have to vary his alignment quite a bit to make sure it's not a tell.
We can run a power to the T like 14, except now its 12.
PT releases to M
T releases to W
BB kicks T
We have triple team at POA- G-C-G
FB blocks S- we don't have to worry about E or C to that side- we would either Nasty them out or run pattern

The only caveat- in real world- real games non select football I DONT always have a RT who can shield that W off. Sometimes yes, sometimes no. That's reality.

If teams are really counter conscious and the W likes to sit on Counter- we will sometimes call a "yes" tag which means the WB will fake an OUTSIDE counter path to hold him up a bit. Like 14- we really don't need the WBs block on this play.
« Last Edit: June 18, 2014, 10:24:09 AM by davecisar »
However beautiful the strategy, you should occasionally look at the results.

Winston Churchill

Offline davecisar

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Re: Defending the UBSW Offense
« Reply #419 on: June 18, 2014, 08:16:57 AM »
The two plays I like are the Reverse and Trap. These are two well designed plays and can hurt the Split 4-4 if the weakside end, Rover and Will overplay the power, sweep, wedge etc. to the strong side.  They weakside must be disciplined.  WILL and ROVER are on a bit of an island vs. the trap:




REVERSE
  • WEAK END:  On flow away, his head must look inside before getting any deeper than the heels of the EMLOS.  Look for any kick-out block by the BB or lineman pulling inside out. Squeeze the counter inside by adjusting charge angle down the line of scrimmage –look for pulling lineman and squeeze the kick out block keeping outside arm and leg free – do not spill the kick-out.   Do not turn shoulders inside.  Look for the play to bounce outside
  • WILL:  Read step to B gap.  On flow away, cross key BB and follow him to the hole.  Be ready to take the B gap if you can make a play otherwise fit inside the weakside end (C gap).  Attack any lead block in the hole with an inside forearm rip.
  • ROVER: play head up the end.  Do not allow inside release of the end. Cross key BB/WB on flow away looking for any inside pullers coming at you..  Fight pressure and use the ends body to constrict the hole.  Do not go around the block - work across the end's face
  • MIKE: Read step to B gap.  Follow BB/OT under keys.  Scrape weakside B gap looking for cutback.
  • STRONG END:  Play base - maintain contain.  Play the sweep/off-tackle.
  • STRONG CORNER:Play base reading release of TE/WING.  If the wing takes a counter/reverse path, alert with a "COUNTER - COUNTER" call.  Ensure it is not a fake before taking deep cut-off pursuit angle

TRAP
  • ROVER: play head up the end.  Do not allow free release of the end.  Cross key BB/WB looking for inside out pullers coming at you.  Lack of pressure from the end alerts the trap scheme.  Work down the line of scrimmage and squeeze the trapper back into the hole.  Do not turn shoulders inside.  Alternatively p, he can spill the trap and exchange gaps with Will.
  • WILL:  Read step to B gap.  On flow away, cross key BB and follow him to the hole. Read alignment of BB pre-snap.  Anytime he is cheated weak,  beware of trap and alert ROVER.  Fill B gap.  If Rover has closed the gap (spilled the trap), exchange gaps and fill C gap.
  • MIKE: Read step to B gap.  Follow BB under key.   Scrape weakside B gap looking for cutback.  Play the BB under key until it does not work then use OT as underkey.  If you use the OT as the underkey, MIKE cannot help on the trap.

Coach

What does S do when the RTE releases outside?
However beautiful the strategy, you should occasionally look at the results.

Winston Churchill