Author Topic: Defending the UBSW Offense  (Read 158424 times)

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Offline davecisar

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Re: Defending the UBSW Offense
« Reply #420 on: June 18, 2014, 09:24:40 AM »
The two plays I like are the Reverse and Trap. These are two well designed plays and can hurt the Split 4-4 if the weakside end, Rover and Will overplay the power, sweep, wedge etc. to the strong side.  They weakside must be disciplined.  WILL and ROVER are on a bit of an island vs. the trap:




REVERSE
  • WEAK END:  On flow away, his head must look inside before getting any deeper than the heels of the EMLOS.  Look for any kick-out block by the BB or lineman pulling inside out. Squeeze the counter inside by adjusting charge angle down the line of scrimmage –look for pulling lineman and squeeze the kick out block keeping outside arm and leg free – do not spill the kick-out.   Do not turn shoulders inside.  Look for the play to bounce outside
  • WILL:  Read step to B gap.  On flow away, cross key BB and follow him to the hole.  Be ready to take the B gap if you can make a play otherwise fit inside the weakside end (C gap).  Attack any lead block in the hole with an inside forearm rip.
  • ROVER: play head up the end.  Do not allow inside release of the end. Cross key BB/WB on flow away looking for any inside pullers coming at you..  Fight pressure and use the ends body to constrict the hole.  Do not go around the block - work across the end's face
  • MIKE: Read step to B gap.  Follow BB/OT under keys.  Scrape weakside B gap looking for cutback.
  • STRONG END:  Play base - maintain contain.  Play the sweep/off-tackle.
  • STRONG CORNER:Play base reading release of TE/WING.  If the wing takes a counter/reverse path, alert with a "COUNTER - COUNTER" call.  Ensure it is not a fake before taking deep cut-off pursuit angle

TRAP
  • ROVER: play head up the end.  Do not allow free release of the end.  Cross key BB/WB looking for inside out pullers coming at you.  Lack of pressure from the end alerts the trap scheme.  Work down the line of scrimmage and squeeze the trapper back into the hole.  Do not turn shoulders inside.  Alternatively p, he can spill the trap and exchange gaps with Will.
  • WILL:  Read step to B gap.  On flow away, cross key BB and follow him to the hole. Read alignment of BB pre-snap.  Anytime he is cheated weak,  beware of trap and alert ROVER.  Fill B gap.  If Rover has closed the gap (spilled the trap), exchange gaps and fill C gap.
  • MIKE: Read step to B gap.  Follow BB under key.   Scrape weakside B gap looking for cutback.  Play the BB under key until it does not work then use OT as underkey.  If you use the OT as the underkey, MIKE cannot help on the trap.

Coach Titan

Taking another look at this- Im not sure I don't just like our base Power play with one small tag

The S shades inside and likes to contact the RTE- we just stay with that and block him inside
We wont have a double team at the POA- so it's 1 on 1- our RTE is a FB who just doesn't quite have the speed to play FB- usually one of our more aggressive kids, an athlete with some size.

We could use the Double tag- which for the PT means Gap on Double Team- which gives us a double team on S
In real life- that is one of our least called tags- entire seasons without calling it- Ive never called it below the 5-6 grade level in real games- or even taught it to them

The WB just widens- the E may widen with him- or not. Prefer no mans land- a 2 1/2 YD split from the RTE- so easy to pin the DE in if he plays tight to the RTE- if the E widens- he takes himself out of the play.  The WB blocks C

The FB runs funnel and blocks M instead of C- which is how a lot of SW run their power play anyways- as their base
So only real adjustment tag is WB and FB switch jobs.
That is an adjustment we have run a lot with all aged teams in real life- unlike the Double Call with the PT
RG as always cleans up trash and looks to seal W
BB kicks the widened (or not) DE

If the DE chooses not to widen- pin him in with the WB and run Sweep- FB on C, BB on M, RG on trash detail picking up FS or W- whoever gets there
« Last Edit: June 18, 2014, 09:39:21 AM by davecisar »
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Offline MHcoach

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Re: Defending the UBSW Offense
« Reply #421 on: June 18, 2014, 10:18:34 AM »
DC

On trap it's simply a matter of geometry, the distance isn't enough for you guys not to block the DE. We don't have to because of our spacing. It's funny one of my MH coaches would ask how come we don't block him, & I would reply if he makes the tackle then it's one of two things, either the tackle's split wasn't big enough or we have the wrong player running the ball. I still think it's a great play for you guys.

I understand that by design you can't "Bend Bend" the way teams running traditional trap do, but do you teach your BB to make the second bend of the TE's block?

Joe
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Offline davecisar

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Re: Defending the UBSW Offense
« Reply #422 on: June 18, 2014, 10:40:44 AM »
DC

On trap it's simply a matter of geometry, the distance isn't enough for you guys not to block the DE. We don't have to because of our spacing. It's funny one of my MH coaches would ask how come we don't block him, & I would reply if he makes the tackle then it's one of two things, either the tackle's split wasn't big enough or we have the wrong player running the ball. I still think it's a great play for you guys.

I understand that by design you can't "Bend Bend" the way teams running traditional trap do, but do you teach your BB to make the second bend of the TE's block?

Joe

Joe

That's an idea- we do sometimes go to "sloppy" splits to help us on traps and Isos
Also note- when the BB catches the ball- just like in the Nebraska film- he has to hesitate to allow the pulling guard to get in front of him to make the trap block
Since it doesn't hit super fast- that gives the DE a chance to make a play IF he is unblocked in real life for us anyways
That's why I really like the Mouse or Spinner action behind it

We talked about this on our WB trap off of ISO action- which you helped me solve- out of box style. Thanks again for the help  ;D
« Last Edit: June 18, 2014, 10:49:55 AM by davecisar »
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Re: Defending the UBSW Offense
« Reply #423 on: June 18, 2014, 10:49:24 AM »
Dave

You should look into no pull traps. The BB position sets up beautifully for this and you can now trap any DLM with ease to include a player over the Center.

By not pulling you also have an extra OLM to block at the POA...first level or second level.

Really really really nice little play designs and easy to install. We call it WHAM traps. Just have to teach the OLM which DL victim to let in per the call. This also avoids the lazy DLM that you and I have talked about that kill traps at the youth level by them not being aggressive. Now rather than spending all of your practice time teaching a 31 or 14 trap.... and you get into a game where the 31 and 14 traps would be great vs the LB's but the DLM are being lazy.....you can now just trap the aggressive DLM regardless of where he is aligned. If that DLM happens to be playing right over the traditional BB alignment....move the BB to the short side.

Then snap him the football and run a naked trap...yes a naked trap. This is a GREAT play once or twice per game if you are running a lot of traps.
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Offline davecisar

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Re: Defending the UBSW Offense
« Reply #424 on: June 18, 2014, 10:53:39 AM »
Dave

You should look into no pull traps. The BB position sets up beautifully for this and you can now trap any DLM with ease to include a player over the Center.

By not pulling you also have an extra OLM to block at the POA...first level or second level.

Really really really nice little play designs and easy to install. We call it WHAM traps. Just have to teach the OLM which DL victim to let in per the call. This also avoids the lazy DLM that you and I have talked about that kill traps at the youth level by them not being aggressive. Now rather than spending all of your practice time teaching a 31 or 14 trap.... and you get into a game where the 31 and 14 traps would be great vs the LB's but the DLM are being lazy.....you can now just trap the aggressive DLM regardless of where he is aligned. If that DLM happens to be playing right over the traditional BB alignment....move the BB to the short side.

Then snap him the football and run a naked trap...yes a naked trap. This is a GREAT play once or twice per game if you are running a lot of traps.

Mike

I agree
I guess you haven't been following our 14 Power play or 12 Power that have been talked about in this thread quite a bit. Those plays we have to come up with another name for because they aren't powers. We added the 14 back in 2009 or 2010- the 12 out of base- still experimenting with. Not ready to add it just yet.
 Both trap with the BB
Same for our Jet Trap play to the 2- traps with the BB

Titan tried to draw it up on reply #414- that isn't how we run it- but gives you a reasonable idea.

Since some teams like to key the BB- our 14  traps send him away- and the LBs  ;D

Thanks for the advice "Coach", it is appreciated when given with the right intent & attitude
« Last Edit: June 18, 2014, 11:02:36 AM by davecisar »
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Re: Defending the UBSW Offense
« Reply #425 on: June 18, 2014, 11:03:27 AM »
Mike

I guess you haven't been following our 14 Power play or 12 Power that have been talked about in this thread quite a bit. Those plays we have to come up with another name for because they aren't powers. We added the 14 back in 2009 or 2010- the 12 out of base- still experimenting with. Not ready to add it just yet.
 Both trap with the BB
Same for our Jet Trap play to the 2- traps with the BB

Titan tried to draw it up on reply #414- that isn't how we run it- but gives you a reasonable idea.

Since some teams like to key the BB- our 14  traps send him away- and the LBs  ;D

Thanks for the advice "Coach", it is appreciated when given with the right intent & attitude


LOL...

I thought I saw some pulling in those diagrams.

Amazing what intent and attitude does for a discussion.  ;)
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Offline davecisar

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Re: Defending the UBSW Offense
« Reply #426 on: June 18, 2014, 11:05:45 AM »
Mike

Remember- 14 Power was the play weve always used against that stack stunt you like to use

Ive been telling you about that play for several years now

We don't pull on it - don't need to
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Re: Defending the UBSW Offense
« Reply #427 on: June 18, 2014, 11:13:16 AM »
Mike

Remember- 14 Power was the play weve always used against that stack stunt you like to use

Ive been telling you about that play for several years now

We don't pull on it - don't need to

Dave

It wasn't in my WYF Book so I thought I was outdated. That's been all cleared up in this Thread.
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Offline Pearls of Wisdom

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Re: Defending the UBSW Offense
« Reply #428 on: June 18, 2014, 12:58:55 PM »
A GOOD WT-6 coach uses the OVERSHIFT-6 vs. the UBSW, & will NOT align in the base WT-6 unless the long-side of the formation is into the boundary (then the WT-6 outnumbers the offense to the open side of the field).  Therefore the blocking on plays to the strong-side will NOT be the same as blocking the WT-6 UNLESS you run into the boundary!

See notes from the "Bear" attached:
« Last Edit: June 18, 2014, 01:11:15 PM by billmountjoy »
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Offline davecisar

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Re: Defending the UBSW Offense
« Reply #429 on: June 18, 2014, 02:17:48 PM »
--------------------- F--Q
-----------W------   B
---------------E-T-T-G-C-G-E
---------E---T—G----G----T-E
-------------------B-----B
----------C----------------------C
--------------------S

As to Bills overshift- There are lots of ways to attack this- right off the top of my head:

At the youth level- my first choice would be wedge- the LG would have the pressure of 3-5-7 players on him with everyone shaded to the outside
We like that off a variety of backfield actions

When we see 2 D linemen head up or wider than our RTE- we like to Nasty split them and then just run Power a hole tighter- Just fan the T and E who are shaded outside with the RTE and WB. releasing the PT and uncovered RT to LBs
No need to block the C- the play hits too far inside for him to be a big factor
BB kicks out the LG and the FB leads up on any LBs that were missed or S if he shows
« Last Edit: June 18, 2014, 02:42:16 PM by davecisar »
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Offline JB

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Re: Defending the UBSW Offense
« Reply #430 on: June 18, 2014, 02:51:11 PM »
--------------------- F--Q
-----------W------   B
---------------E-T-T-G-C-G-E
---------E---T—G----G----T-E
-------------------B-----B
----------C----------------------C
--------------------S

There are lots of ways to attack this- right off the top of my head:

At the youth level- my first choice would be wedge- the RG would have the pressure of 3-5-7 players on him with everyone shaded to the outside
We like that off a variety of backfield actions

When we see 2 D linemen head up or wider than our RTE- we like to Nasty split them and then just run Power a hole tighter- releasing the PT and RT to LBs
BB kicks out the RG and the FB leads up on any LBs that were missed or S if he shows

And why sit in one formation all game long?

Coach Keuffel, for example, (whom I admire greatly) would have immediately gone to his "end over" formation in which he aligns his QE on strong side. He also would align his TB (or some "other kid who can block" as I heard him say it on tape at a SW Symposium) to weakside as a "WB". BTW, as an aside, I could never understand his book until I heard him describe how he ran his offense. I wish I could have spoken with him!

Last season, we would have adjusted the alignment of the SE, QE, WB, and BB. The WB and BB would be moved to both strong and weak sides, to a number of locations. All to provide "leverage" and to FORCE the opposing coaches to decide how to adjust. Just as Doc Ward and many others do it. Now, I've been fortunate enough to be up in a booth the last two years on Friday nights but, these are VERY simple to do. I understand it might be a bit more of a challenge on the field without coaching help from up in a booth.

This is no different than when running DC's DCWT offense or Jack's DW. It all comes down to "formationing" to gain advantages. Its no different!

As to the running to the short side of the field. We ALWAYS do that to our side early in the game. There is no better method for seeing, up close, how the defense is aligning and adjusting. Best idea I ever learned, on the field and during games, from a local HS HC.

FWIW, Coach K. also always threw to short side of field. Always. He believed that it was an easier throw to make with less space. Doc, as you know, does the same thing. Not sure if Menominee does that as well, but, as you know, they pass the ball alot.

One observation that has not been brought up in this crazy long thread, is the challenge that I see most frequently at youth level around here...that the refs usually mark the football in the middle of the field since hash marks are not shown on many youth fields (youth programs around here usually do not play on HS fields). That, to me, has a huge impact on what plays you might call/install.

Is the continual marking of the ball in the center of the field crazy? Yes.



« Last Edit: June 18, 2014, 03:00:07 PM by JB »
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Offline davecisar

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Re: Defending the UBSW Offense
« Reply #431 on: June 18, 2014, 02:56:52 PM »
And why sit in one formation all game long?

Coach Keuffel, for example, (whom I admire greatly) would have immediately gone to his "end over" formation in which he aligns his QE on strong side. He also would align his TB (or some "other kid who can block" as I heard him say it on tape at a SW Symposium) to weakside as a TB. I could never understand his book until I heard him describe how he ran his offense. I wish I could have spoken with him!

Last season, we would have adjusted the alignment of the SE, QE, WB, and BB.The WB and BB would be moved to both strong and weak sides, to a number of locations. All to provide "leverage" and to FORCE the opposing coaches to decide how to adjust. Just look up Doc Ward adjustments and you'll understand. Now, I've been fortunate enough to be up in a booth the last two years on Friday nights but, these are VERY simple to do. I understand it might be a bit more of a challenge on the field without coaching help from up in a booth.

This is no different than when running DC's DCWT offense or Jack's DW. It all comes down to "formationing" to gain advantages. Its no different!

As to the running to the short side of the field. We ALWAYS do that to our side early in the game. There is no better method for seeing, up close, how the defense is aligning and adjusting. Best idea I ever learned, on the field and during games, from a local HS HC.

FWIW, Coach K. also always threw to short side of field. Always. He believed that it was an easier throw to make with less space. Doc, as you know, does the same thing. Not sure if Menominee does that as well, but, as you know, they pass the ball alot.

One observation that has not been brought up in this crazy long thread, is the challenge that I see most frequently at youth level around here...that the refs usually mark the football in the middle of the field since hash marks are not shown on many youth fields (youth programs around here usually do not play on HS fields). That, to me, has a huge impact on what plays you might call/intsall. Is the marking in center of field crazy? Yes.

Coach,

We wouldn't ever in any game stay in the same formation
Some assume we will for some reason  ;)

As to formationing- we call that Split- we have the call and of course we do run it
I wanted to stay away from the more "exotic" things and stick with some of the basics in this discussion

Even at the youngest age groups-- we will get into several different formations early. THe guys on this forum who watched my 7-9s play at KState on Labor Day weekend- that's game 2 for us- saw us in at least 5 different sets.

Ive talked at length about formationing and adjustments in this very thread- lots of formations and adjustments- few plays

As to short side to friendly sidelines- yes I talked about that in this very thread- one of my favorite things to do. That is in my book- the 303 stuff and Game Day mgmt DVD. Yes we don't have a spotter in the booth- it works seeing them up close while the DC cant

We play all games in HS stadiums with HS refs, they mark the ball on the hash when it should be- which I love
« Last Edit: June 18, 2014, 03:04:27 PM by davecisar »
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Offline MHcoach

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Re: Defending the UBSW Offense
« Reply #432 on: June 18, 2014, 03:05:45 PM »
DC

I am talking about the actual path the BB takes once he gets up field. In the same manor that there is a "Belly" path on inside Veer or Belly, there is a traditional Trap path. The key being for the BC to feel the BIL block. In order to get the maximum yardage on the play we want our back to know his steps even when gets upfield.

This is old stuff, I was taught from the Paul Brown school of running trap, which carried over to the Wing T. I'm sure CMJ has an attachment of someone doing it from the 1890's.  The basic idea is to get as vertical ASAP, so the BC bends around the BIL block to get vertical.

Joe
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Offline JB

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Re: Defending the UBSW Offense
« Reply #433 on: June 18, 2014, 03:07:43 PM »
Coach,

We wouldn't ever in any game stay in the same formation
Some assume we will for some reason  ;)

As to formationing- we call that Split- we have the call and of course we do run it
I wanted to stay away from the more "exotic" things and stick with some of the basics

Ive talked at length about formationing and adjustments in this very thread- lots of formations and adjustments- few plays

As to short side to friendly sidelines- yes I talked about that in this very thread- one of my favorite things to do

We play all games in HS stadiums with HS refs, they mark the ball on the hash when it should be- which I love

I have to admit, I've read some of it and skimmed a bunch of it.

On the marking, we love to call a BB Throwback pass on an x-pt play, we will request that the ball be placed on a far hash. We run sweep towards the wide side and throwback to BB on short hash side. Lots of other options off of sweep pass down there as well. Fun stuff to call.
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Offline JrTitan

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Re: Defending the UBSW Offense
« Reply #434 on: June 18, 2014, 07:22:02 PM »
Coach

What does S do when the RTE releases outside?

Widen a step fighting the release and keep eyes inside for a kick- out block by a pulling lineman or near back.  The TE is his pressure key and his visual keys (i.e., ball level, backfield flow and blocking scheme) give him a run/pass read.  Basically mug the TE until the play is diagnosed.

Make sense?
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