Author Topic: Defending the UBSW Offense  (Read 158454 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline DumCoach

  • Administrator
  • Platinum
  • Posts: 9872
  • Total likes: 702
  • "What me worry? I'm not far enough behind yet!"
  • Coaching: 10 & Under
  • Defense: DC 46
  • Offense: DC Wing T
Re: Defending the UBSW Offense
« Reply #90 on: June 10, 2014, 05:26:52 PM »
Clark

I was referring to his newsletter comment that you quoted.

Sorry for the confusion. I also believe anything can be beat.

But I quoted him.  Am I wrong?

Well!  We'll see if he answers.   :)

 
"Football is for the kids - But let's win anyway."

Offline DumCoach

  • Administrator
  • Platinum
  • Posts: 9872
  • Total likes: 702
  • "What me worry? I'm not far enough behind yet!"
  • Coaching: 10 & Under
  • Defense: DC 46
  • Offense: DC Wing T
Re: Defending the UBSW Offense
« Reply #91 on: June 10, 2014, 05:27:49 PM »




While we wait on Dave Cisar I'll comment on part of the above system.  If you count from the center weak, you'll count Center, LG, LT, and left HB or four players.   But, if you count the defense  to the weak side, you count five defenders (DT, Will, CB, OLB, and FS). 

If the play goes strong with QB, in the above, only only W and CR are assigned to follow (FS has the Tackle Eligible.) and CR has the farthest distance on the field to go to the play and isn't going to get there.  Thus, the offense only left three players behind (C, LG, and LT) whereas the defense left four (DT, OLB, CR, and FS).  The offense has a +1 man advantage to run strong.

This is very typical of defenses facing an unbalanced line.  The reason the defense has an extra player is because the LT  (Tackle eligible) is tying up two defenders - A run defender (the DT) and a pass defender (in this case FS).  The LT can be be the worst player on the entire offense and he's tying up two defenders.  Now Killer Bee will solve this problem and leave just three defenders behind to cover the three offensive players but most defenses won't do this.   It's one of several beauties of the UBSW. 

Maybe Bill will share with us how he solves this problem?
"Football is for the kids - But let's win anyway."

Offline mahonz

  • Administrator
  • Kryptonite
  • Posts: 24265
  • Total likes: 2547
  • No Wimps
  • Coaching: 8 & Under
  • Defense: 3-5-3
  • Offense: Wing T
  • Title: Head Coach
Re: Defending the UBSW Offense
« Reply #92 on: June 10, 2014, 06:20:41 PM »
Clark

The numbers game you point out makes me wonder how many UBSW Coaches here will face opponents that don't at least shift to strength?
What is beautiful, lives forever.

Offline DumCoach

  • Administrator
  • Platinum
  • Posts: 9872
  • Total likes: 702
  • "What me worry? I'm not far enough behind yet!"
  • Coaching: 10 & Under
  • Defense: DC 46
  • Offense: DC Wing T
Re: Defending the UBSW Offense
« Reply #93 on: June 10, 2014, 06:21:53 PM »
OK.  I looked up how Bill solved it while waiting on Dave.  He doesn't count from the ball.  He counts from the middle pulling guard (in bold):


                             O   O
              O       O   
                  O O O O 0 O O
            E   T      G     G   T     E
                     B            B
            H               S             H


The defense has 5.5 players to each side of the Pulling Guard.  I'll need to read what G in bold does because, unless he slants strong, on a play strong, G, T, E, and H get left behind (or four players) to the offense's three (C, LG, and LT).  Again, not a problem for Killer Bee that will number right up with it. 

Anyone have a different solution?

Seeing those defensive Half Backs Bill had drawn up was a trip back to 1940 football books!   :)
"Football is for the kids - But let's win anyway."

Offline DumCoach

  • Administrator
  • Platinum
  • Posts: 9872
  • Total likes: 702
  • "What me worry? I'm not far enough behind yet!"
  • Coaching: 10 & Under
  • Defense: DC 46
  • Offense: DC Wing T
Re: Defending the UBSW Offense
« Reply #94 on: June 10, 2014, 06:59:48 PM »
Clark

The numbers game you point out makes me wonder how many UBSW Coaches here will face opponents that don't at least shift to strength?

First game?  You can bet nobody shifts with an unbalanced line.  It's basic coaching psychology.   We are all trying to get in our offense, kickoff, Kick return, punt, and punt return and the only time spent spent with the defense is, on average, two minutes per player, per season in practice.  Otherwise, it sees what our own offense runs.  So, when the other team comes out unbalanced first game, nobody shifts.  The DC forgets to cover this.  It's an automatic win for the unbalanced team.

I was one of those coaches that got beat this way.  I was a victim of coaching psychology.  Next year, I forgot it again and somebody else did it to me.   DOH!  So then I remembered after that and would make my defense line up on my DCWT offense in about 10 different formations.  You could just about watch the defense's heads explode in their helmets.  I'm like, "What's so hard about this?"

But it is hard.  Even after I trained the "D" to shift, a team suddenly went unbalanced that hadn't done so before in the game on their own one yard line.  Mike saw it and stepped forward to move the DT's down and that's when ball was snapped, 99 yards for a TD.

So I went to the next step and went from "everybody looks" to "one guy looks" and he calls the shift.  Then it got done. 

Meanwhile shifting the front does not shift the coverage and so you end up with a DT and pass defender on a 'Tackle Eligible" who, if the QB is under center, no one will ever throw to.  As you know, DC46 will make the coverage shift, do it seamlessly and without confusion, and end up with your T,C, and E against their C, LG, and LT, thereby numbering up perfectly and with the Tackle Eligible covered. But not many coaches can do this.  It's one of the reasons I've never lost to an UBSW team. 

 
"Football is for the kids - But let's win anyway."

Offline Pearls of Wisdom

  • Gold
  • Posts: 4611
  • Total likes: 73
  • Read Only Account. Please no PM's or Emails
  • Coaching: High School
  • Defense: Undecided
  • Offense: Undecided
  • Title: Retired
Re: Defending the UBSW Offense
« Reply #95 on: June 10, 2014, 07:03:54 PM »
OVERSHIFTED-6:

Like Bob Neyland, Bud Wilkinson, Woody Hayes, & "Bear" Bryant ALWAYS said.  When playing vs. the UBSW = ALWAYS CONSIDER THE FIELD (horizontal placement of the ball).  80% of the time the ball will be placed within 5 yards of the hash.  "Defend the open field" & force them into the boundary because it never missed a tackle & serves as an "extra defender" = (see ATTACHMENT #2)

A)  BALL ON HASH WITH STRENGTH TO THE WIDE FIELD,  OR,  BALL AT MID-FIELD = THE "OVERSHIFTED-6" is "how to go" because you have the NUMBERS advantage, AND, you can put a QUICK Nose to follow in the pulling guard's hip pocket RIGHT to the play.  At Oklahoma in the 1940's & 1950's = Bud Wilkinson NEVER LOST to the UBSW playing this defense (NEITHER did we in the 1950's & 1960's)!  SEE ATTACHMENT #1 AT BOTTOM:

B)  BALL WITHIN 5 YDS. OF HASH & WING INTO BOUNDARY = BASE WIDE TACKLE-6.


"OVERSHIFTED-6" (LEFT).  NOTE:  These are the TECHNIQUES as used by the MASTERS of defeating the UBSW (Neyland, Wilkinson, Hayes, Bryant):

LEFT END:  Line up on the line of scrimmage 2-3 feet outside the wingback.  Look through the wingback to the fullback and tailback.  Use your normal rule of  “Ball come, I come;  ball go I go”, but as you play this key, you must always be conscious of the movement of the wingback.  When the ball is snapped, take one step across the line scrimmage, watching the wingback.  If the ball is coming your way and the wingback is swinging to get outside position on you, take one more step in and then fade with the wingback so that he CAN NEVER BLOCK YOU IN.  This is a most difficult block.  If you will take two steps across the line of scrimmage and then give ground to the outside, the wingback should never be able to hook you in.  But if you look only at the fullback and the tailback and lose sight of the wingback, he will be able to hit you while you are “blind” and will be able to block you effectively. 
     If the wingback drives straight downfield, or double teams in on the tackle and the ball is coming your way, flatten your course quickly and move to the inside to close the gap between yourself and the tackle.  Continue to close and be in position to meet the blockers with a strong hand shiver.  As you hit the blockers, maintain your ability to move back and to the outside.  Your basic responsibility is to NEVER TO BECOME BLOCKED IN by any member of the offensive team.  If you watch the wingback, you will never be blocked in by him.  However, if you drive in too hard when the wingback goes straight upfield, one of the linemen, the fullback, or the blocking back may be able to hook you.  Remember, close the gap fast, but maintain your balance well enough so that you can adjust and move back to the outside if necessary.
     If the ball goes away from you, turn and drop back.  Play as a normal end of  a five-man containing unit.



LEFT TACKLE:  Line up just outside the offensive end, facing slightly to the inside.  Watch the end-wingback combination.  As the ball is snapped, charge hard at the offensive end.  Never let the end block you in alone.  As you charge the end, be conscious of the wingback.   (1)  If he is double teaming on you, be sure you can recover off the end and hit the wingback with a good forearm or hand shiver while working to the outside.  If the wingback blocks you in, you have not failed in your assignment.  However, you should make every effort to fight through the pressure of his block to the outside.   (2)  If the end blocks to the inside on your Guard, work fast down the line of scrimmage to the inside.  Do not get penetration if the end makes this movement.  In all probability, the blocking back or a lineman will trap you.   (3)  If the ball goes away from you, get depth immediately until you are as deep as the ball.  Maintain outside leverage against reverses.


LEFT GUARD:  Line up shading the outside of the offensive tackle.  As the ball is snapped, charge hard into the tackle, being sure that he cannot block you in alone.  As you make the charge, use your usual peripheral vision in keying the three offensive linemen in your immediate area.  If either the end or the outside guard is driving at you, adjust your charge to meet the pressure of the block.  Play the ball.
Note:  You must be conscious of the fact  that the only likely trap against you will be from the inside.  If you charge across the line of scrimmage, hit the guard opposite you, and get past him too easily, you should suspect that a trap play is being run.  When this happens, turn your head quickly to the inside and drive back for the line of scrimmage.  Try to keep your head inside the trap blocker, who, in this instance, will either be the short side tackle, or the inside guard playing next to the center.


RIGHT GUARD:  Line up head up with the middle lineman.  Since this formation is usually played from an unbalanced line you will be opposite the inside guard.  Charge straight into the inside guard, control your charge as well as possible, but hit with enough strength to drive the guard back.  Use your peripheral vision; watch the tackle, the guards, and the center.  React to these three men as you normally would in a regular “3 on 1” drill.  If you penetrate too easily you should suspect a trap in the making.  Traps on you will almost always come from your inside (your left).  If you feel a trap in the making, do not penetrate further.  Turn your head to the inside and move back toward the line of scrimmage.


RIGHT TACKLE:  Line up on the offensive tackle shading him to the outside.  Be positive that he cannot block you in alone.  Watch the center, the tackle, and the end.  Key these three men exactly as you would in on regular “3 on 1” drill.  If you get penetration too easily, suspect a trap.  The trap will always come from the inside.  If you feel a trap coming, do not penetrate into the backfield.  Turn your head along the line of scrimmage, and keep your head between the trap blocker and the course of the ball.


RIGHT END:  Line up on the outside shoulder of the offensive end.  Charge the end and hit him, making every effort to keep him on the line of scrimmage.  React to the end’s block.  If the end is attempting to go downfield, hit him and hold him up.  As soon as he gets away from you, move in, reacting normally to the ball with your old rule of “Ball come, I come;  ball go, I go”.  You must remember that the end should never be allowed to get off the line of scrimmage TO YOUR OUTSIDE.  If he is able to do this, he will be able to hook you in.  Your basic assignment is never to be blocked in by the offensive end.
     If the end blocks in on your tackle, move down the line of scrimmage with him, trying to knock him off the block.  Stay shallow so that you cannot be blocked out by linemen, or the blocking back coming your way on a reverse.
     If the ball is going away from you, deepen as soon as you lose control of the end.  When you are as deep as the ball, pursue it, maintaining leverage on the play.


LEFT LINEBACKER:  Line up 2 ½ yards deep head up with the outside guard.  React to the guard.  If the guard pulls either way, go with him.  If  the guard makes an aggressive block to either side, start to fill the hole.  Be conscious of the linemen on either side of the guard.  If either of these men pulls in either direction, do not continue through the hole.  Move with them.  If neither of them pulls, continue to fill the gap.  The ball will be coming into your area.  If the guard makes a pass-protection block, drop quickly to your hook zone.


RIGHT LINEBACKER:  Line up 2 ½ deep shading the short side of the offensive center.  React to the offensive center.  If the center pulls in either direction, go with him.  If the center blocks aggressively to the right or to the left, come up to fill the hole.  Be conscious of the offensive linemen on either side of the center.  If neither of these men has pulled, continue to shoot through the gap.  If either of them has pulled, do not continue through the gap.  Adjust, play slowly, find the ball, and react on your normal angle of pursuit.  If the center makes a pass-protection block, drop back and cover your normal hook zone.

LEFT CORNER:  Line up 3 yards outside the wingback and 8 yards deep.  As the ball is snapped look through the uncovered lineman (in this case the tackle) to the ball.  You should always be playing pass defense first and not be overly worried about the possibility of a run.  In most instances the uncovered lineman will give you an excellent key.  Remember that you must stay back and play pass until some lineman is down the field or the ball carrier has crossed the line of scrimmage. 


RIGHT CORNER (away from wingback):  Line up 2 to 3 yards outside the offensive end, & 5 yards downfield.  Look through the uncovered lineman (in this case the tackle) to the ball.  React normally to the movement of the uncovered lineman.  Remember, you must play pass defense first and must not be caught up forcing the play unless you are positive it is a run.


MIDDLE SAFETY:  Line up 12 yards deep, approximately opposite the offensive fullback.  Move laterally with the flow of the play.  As you make this movement, look at the uncovered lineman.  Be sure that you do not come up unless the uncovered lineman is downfield.  Your first movement is lateral, and if the lineman is not downfield you should begin to give ground slightly back on your second or third step.  If the ball continues in a lateral direction outside the defensive tackle to either side, you should speed up your lateral movement and attempt to get outside position quickly in order that you can call “clear” to your outside Corner.  As soon as you are wide and deep enough to cover the deep outside zone, call “clear” so that your outside Corner can move up to cover the flat and support the play.  You will have no trouble doing this if you will slide with the movement of the ball
and give ground back and to the outside quickly if the ball continues laterally past the defensive tackles.

SEE DIAGRAM OF "OVERSHIFTED-6" = ATTACHED #1:
SEE WOODY HAYES STATEMENT ABOUT "DEFEND THE OPEN SIDE" = ATTACHED #2 (WHY the Overshifted-6 is vital):
« Last Edit: June 11, 2014, 09:43:11 AM by billmountjoy »
My Contact Info: Coach Bill Mountjoy phone: 804-716-7038 EST /  Email: butzadams@hotmail.com

Offline DumCoach

  • Administrator
  • Platinum
  • Posts: 9872
  • Total likes: 702
  • "What me worry? I'm not far enough behind yet!"
  • Coaching: 10 & Under
  • Defense: DC 46
  • Offense: DC Wing T
Re: Defending the UBSW Offense
« Reply #96 on: June 10, 2014, 07:18:39 PM »
Thanks, Bill!

Now we're just waitn' on Dave.
"Football is for the kids - But let's win anyway."

Offline Pearls of Wisdom

  • Gold
  • Posts: 4611
  • Total likes: 73
  • Read Only Account. Please no PM's or Emails
  • Coaching: High School
  • Defense: Undecided
  • Offense: Undecided
  • Title: Retired
Re: Defending the UBSW Offense
« Reply #97 on: June 10, 2014, 07:28:53 PM »
Thanks, Bill!

Now we're just waitn' on Dave.


"DEFEND THE OPEN FIELD" (FAMOUS WOODY HAYES QUOTE) = SEE ATTACHED:
« Last Edit: June 10, 2014, 07:44:05 PM by billmountjoy »
My Contact Info: Coach Bill Mountjoy phone: 804-716-7038 EST /  Email: butzadams@hotmail.com

Offline Michael

  • Diamond
  • Posts: 14275
  • Total likes: 2843
  • Coaching: 13 & Under
  • Defense: Undecided
  • Offense: One Back
  • Title: Assistant
Michael can not receive PM's, emails or respond to Posts. He passed away in September 2018. To honor his contributions we are leaving his account active. R.I.P - Dumcoach Staff.

Offline belebuch

  • Platinum
  • Posts: 6041
  • Total likes: 81
  • Coaching: 6 & Under
  • Defense: Undecided
  • Offense: Undecided
  • Title: Other
Re: Defending the UBSW Offense
« Reply #99 on: June 10, 2014, 07:44:11 PM »
No disrespect intended but I always have to  ::) when I look at a defense that states "don't let player X block you alone" What if he can?
Its like many arguments on here where you show an offensive gameplan and the other guy says "Well my Mike is a beast and never gets blocked one on one" What if he goes fishing with his uncle Jim that day you play?
So lets treat it like chess and trade pawn for pawn or a stalemate and see how it holds up. Then i'm game


Offline Pearls of Wisdom

  • Gold
  • Posts: 4611
  • Total likes: 73
  • Read Only Account. Please no PM's or Emails
  • Coaching: High School
  • Defense: Undecided
  • Offense: Undecided
  • Title: Retired
Re: Defending the UBSW Offense
« Reply #100 on: June 10, 2014, 07:46:24 PM »
No disrespect intended but I always have to  ::) when I look at a defense that states "don't let player X block you alone" What if he can?
Its like many arguments on here where you show an offensive gameplan and the other guy says "Well my Mike is a beast and never gets blocked one on one" What if he goes fishing with his uncle Jim that day you play?
So lets treat it like chess and trade pawn for pawn or a stalemate and see how it holds up. Then i'm game


The team that loses the HIGHEST % of "one on one" battles obviously will LOSE the game:
My Contact Info: Coach Bill Mountjoy phone: 804-716-7038 EST /  Email: butzadams@hotmail.com

Offline belebuch

  • Platinum
  • Posts: 6041
  • Total likes: 81
  • Coaching: 6 & Under
  • Defense: Undecided
  • Offense: Undecided
  • Title: Other
Re: Defending the UBSW Offense
« Reply #101 on: June 10, 2014, 07:50:28 PM »
Coach im just saying we can do this all day with any offense or defense if on paper our guy is superior to the other guy.

Offline Pearls of Wisdom

  • Gold
  • Posts: 4611
  • Total likes: 73
  • Read Only Account. Please no PM's or Emails
  • Coaching: High School
  • Defense: Undecided
  • Offense: Undecided
  • Title: Retired
Re: Defending the UBSW Offense
« Reply #102 on: June 10, 2014, 08:18:51 PM »
Coach im just saying we can do this all day with any offense or defense if on paper our guy is superior to the other guy.


I see "coaches" LOSE with talent (the ones that get fired), but I don't see many coaches win WITHOUT it!
As Don Shula said = "the team with the best personnel wins over 90% of the time"!  It is defeating the team that has equal or better talent than you that MATTERS!
« Last Edit: June 10, 2014, 09:23:21 PM by billmountjoy »
My Contact Info: Coach Bill Mountjoy phone: 804-716-7038 EST /  Email: butzadams@hotmail.com

Offline DumCoach

  • Administrator
  • Platinum
  • Posts: 9872
  • Total likes: 702
  • "What me worry? I'm not far enough behind yet!"
  • Coaching: 10 & Under
  • Defense: DC 46
  • Offense: DC Wing T
Re: Defending the UBSW Offense
« Reply #103 on: June 10, 2014, 10:10:19 PM »
I always respect the coach that can beat you with his team, trade teams, and beat you again. 

If I had to win on talent I'd be screwed.  I coached in a draft system.  If you won first place, you drafted last place next year.    It didn't bother me.  One season I took first place with all last round draft picks.  I faced one team that everybody beat every year so that everybody on that team was a first round pick (And you could keep your players for up to 7 years).  I was playing them one year and the score was tied 6-6 so I called timeout to go out and figure out how to put this team away.  We're on offense so I'm looking at their defense from the huddle.  They were in GAM and I still remember what I saw looking at them.  The two DG's they had bear crawling the "A" gaps were  bigger, stronger, and faster than anybody I had on my entire team.    And these were their MPP's. I remember my mouth falling open and wondering how I even had 6 points. 

The next year they got a real coach and the score was not 6-6.  It was 52-0, their favor.  And they just didn't do it to me.  They did to everybody.  Seven years worth of first round draft picks made itself known that season.  Their coach moved the next year and a moron replaced him and they were right back in the toilet again overnight.  Talent needs a coach.  And no talent needs an even better coach. 

There was a time when the PAC (then PAC 10) always came down to USC versus UCLA.  That was it.  USC used to hand out 400 scholarships, not to get 400 players, but to keep them from playing for another PAC 10 school against them.  They had the best coaches and the best players and yet somehow, a coach with less, would somehow rise up and beat them.  One USC coach was fired for losing to WSU.

So I believe I can beat better with less provided the difference isn't gigantic.  I did it all the time.  In 17 years, I had two good teams talent wise.  Otherwise, I made do.    It's why the game is always changing.  Somebody with lesser talent (like the DW) figured out how to beat someone with more.

So where's Dave?
"Football is for the kids - But let's win anyway."

Offline mahonz

  • Administrator
  • Kryptonite
  • Posts: 24265
  • Total likes: 2547
  • No Wimps
  • Coaching: 8 & Under
  • Defense: 3-5-3
  • Offense: Wing T
  • Title: Head Coach
Re: Defending the UBSW Offense
« Reply #104 on: June 11, 2014, 12:40:31 AM »
First game?  You can bet nobody shifts with an unbalanced line.  It's basic coaching psychology.   We are all trying to get in our offense, kickoff, Kick return, punt, and punt return and the only time spent spent with the defense is, on average, two minutes per player, per season in practice.  Otherwise, it sees what our own offense runs.  So, when the other team comes out unbalanced first game, nobody shifts.  The DC forgets to cover this.  It's an automatic win for the unbalanced team.

I was one of those coaches that got beat this way.  I was a victim of coaching psychology.  Next year, I forgot it again and somebody else did it to me.   DOH!  So then I remembered after that and would make my defense line up on my DCWT offense in about 10 different formations.  You could just about watch the defense's heads explode in their helmets.  I'm like, "What's so hard about this?"

But it is hard.  Even after I trained the "D" to shift, a team suddenly went unbalanced that hadn't done so before in the game on their own one yard line.  Mike saw it and stepped forward to move the DT's down and that's when ball was snapped, 99 yards for a TD.

So I went to the next step and went from "everybody looks" to "one guy looks" and he calls the shift.  Then it got done. 

Meanwhile shifting the front does not shift the coverage and so you end up with a DT and pass defender on a 'Tackle Eligible" who, if the QB is under center, no one will ever throw to.  As you know, DC46 will make the coverage shift, do it seamlessly and without confusion, and end up with your T,C, and E against their C, LG, and LT, thereby numbering up perfectly and with the Tackle Eligible covered. But not many coaches can do this.  It's one of the reasons I've never lost to an UBSW team. 

 

Clark

A lot of guys do well with this O so I was curious if the inexperience from the opponent plays a partial role in that success.
What is beautiful, lives forever.