Author Topic: Rover - You , Me, Gone  (Read 1693 times)

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Offline CoachMattC

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Rover - You , Me, Gone
« on: May 23, 2015, 11:10:25 AM »
Got this from a recent Powerpoint Slide Deck and I'm looking for a few example of situations when the Rover should be trained use each call.  Thanks in advance.
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Offline JrTitan

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Re: Rover - You , Me, Gone
« Reply #1 on: June 02, 2015, 09:32:18 PM »
Got this from a recent Powerpoint Slide Deck and I'm looking for a few example of situations when the Rover should be trained use each call.  Thanks in advance.

Sorry for the delay - I missed this your post.

For those who have not seen the clinic, the Rover (weak OLB) has the following calls to make to the end on his side declaring the end’s contain responsibilities:
  • “YOU”        End has contain and Rover will fill inside first and supports outside second - this is base call
  • “ME”          End plays tougher on the tackle and Rover takes contain responsibilities
  • “GONE”      End must contain because Rover is removed from the immediate support area (same as a no call)

Whenever Rover is a "walk" alignment (splitiing the difference between a wide #1 or #2), he has to give a "GONE" call since he is removed from the front by alignment.   This happens typically when there is more than one split receiver to his side or obvious passing situations.   The GONE call tells the end "I am not here".

A ME call can be given when there is no immediate threat to the flats typically when the #2 receiver is in the backfield.  The end can play tougher on the tackle play and has immediate outside support from the linebacker on the run.  If the end reads pass, he has outside contain rush.  If it is flow away, the end still has bootleg-counter- reverse.

The calls to the end are typically tied to the alignment, coverage, formation and tactical situation.  Here are the most common Rover alignments against a standard pro-set:



The "IN" (or "SPIKE") call tells the end to take the B gap and the Rover supports outside.  The "OUT" call tells the end to support outside and Rover stunts the B gap.  The "IN", "SPIKE" and "OUT" calls can also be given from the base and force positions.
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Offline CoachMattC

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Re: Rover - You , Me, Gone
« Reply #2 on: June 03, 2015, 04:09:55 PM »
A ME call can be given when there is no immediate threat to the flats typically when the #2 receiver is in the backfield.  The end can play tougher on the tackle play and has immediate outside support from the linebacker on the run.  If the end reads pass, he has outside contain rush.  If it is flow away, the end still has bootleg-counter- reverse.

This is exactly what I needed, thanks.
‎"Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember. Involve me and I learn." Benjamin Franklin