Author Topic: Plyometric experiment  (Read 6317 times)

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Offline Vince148

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Re: Plyometric experiment
« Reply #60 on: February 16, 2018, 06:32:12 PM »
I will take Jacks advice here as he is the leading expert on Youth kinesiology.

Building the quads with weight training is the single most important thing to help a player under 12.
While building the quads is important, I don't totally agree with this. It's actually even more important to develop the hip extensors. This helps in the hip roll, for example, when an OL-man is going from a fit position to standing up a DL-man. They are also the muscles that allow the foot to apply force into the ground which generates forward momentum aka speed.

Offline Wing-n-It

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Re: Plyometric experiment
« Reply #61 on: February 16, 2018, 07:34:15 PM »
While building the quads is important, I don't totally agree with this. It's actually even more important to develop the hip extensors. This helps in the hip roll, for example, when an OL-man is going from a fit position to standing up a DL-man. They are also the muscles that allow the foot to apply force into the ground which generates forward momentum aka speed.
In talking with multiple strength trainers, people who understand kids muscles, they have said that there is a chemical that your body releases when you work your quads, its like testosterone, cant remember but it helps with strength, speed, and movement. But I remember them saying it was the single most important muscle you can stress to improve all your muscles.

I wish I could remember but I am too stupid to recall

Im sure someone on here knows.
Robert

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Offline Vince148

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Re: Plyometric experiment
« Reply #62 on: February 16, 2018, 08:51:04 PM »
In talking with multiple strength trainers, people who understand kids muscles, they have said that there is a chemical that your body releases when you work your quads, its like testosterone, cant remember but it helps with strength, speed, and movement. But I remember them saying it was the single most important muscle you can stress to improve all your muscles.

I wish I could remember but I am too stupid to recall

Im sure someone on here knows.
In all of my physiology studies, I don't ever recall where I've ever heard that hormones being released in the body are related to working a specific muscle. Sounds like another myth purported by people who think they know.

Offline Wing-n-It

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Re: Plyometric experiment
« Reply #63 on: February 16, 2018, 08:53:17 PM »
Sounds like another myth purported by people who think they know.
Could be. I thought it was by a few people including my sons college strength coach. Maybe it was to get him to do more squats...
Wouldn't be the first time a college coach lied to a player
Robert

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Offline Wing-n-It

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Re: Plyometric experiment
« Reply #64 on: February 16, 2018, 09:00:10 PM »
As I am not that smart on this subject I will resort to listen to Zach
Robert

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Offline gumby_in_co

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Re: Plyometric experiment
« Reply #65 on: February 17, 2018, 02:55:57 AM »
Where did I say biceps?
I said strength

At no time during your incoherent ramblings did you ever have a logical thought, everyone who reads your posts is now dumber for having read it, I award you no points and may god have mercy on your soul.

"Young Ones" reference. Nice.
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Offline Wing-n-It

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Re: Plyometric experiment
« Reply #66 on: February 19, 2018, 07:24:30 AM »
Robert

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Offline ZACH

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Re: Plyometric experiment
« Reply #67 on: February 19, 2018, 08:31:55 AM »
As I am not that smart on this subject I will resort to listen to Zach

You chose wisely ;)

"Some athletes have division 1 dreams and jv work ethic" - random

Offline ZACH

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Re: Plyometric experiment
« Reply #68 on: February 19, 2018, 08:56:28 AM »
Could be. I thought it was by a few people including my sons college strength coach. Maybe it was to get him to do more squats...
Wouldn't be the first time a college coach lied to a player

Squatting in general is thought to have correlation with testosterone production. Is it measurable,sure. But its likely the same to having an erection.

Anyway...

Wanna make an athlete better? 
-increase their strength
-teach them to use their strength in the motions of their chosen sport.
- force them to be fast in their movements always. Being fast teaches the mind and body to react faster and stronger.
-recovery- allow recovery time and vary intensity levels for optimal performance.

That's as general as it gets, dont let it become complicated... your own experiance is your best teacher.
"Some athletes have division 1 dreams and jv work ethic" - random

Offline gumby_in_co

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Re: Plyometric experiment
« Reply #69 on: April 20, 2018, 03:58:57 PM »
Progress Update:

It's often hard to judge how the plyos are working other than "they look better at it."  However, we just had a big boy join us. 5'11", 290lbs. Actually, he joined awhile back, but was on concussion protocol from a PE accident.

Anyway, our guys have been through the plyo circuit about 20 times at this point. Our biggest player runs about 320. He is huffing and puffing at the end, but finishes just fine. This includes Meat Grinder, a quick lap of bellies and this "buzz feet, hit the bag" thing we do. New guy couldn't wait to put on the pads and hit, but had to pull himself from Meat Grinder due to shortness of breath.
Mission Statement: To create a Football Family that our players and parents can't imagine not being a part of.