Author Topic: Pressure - How it happens in the 63  (Read 293 times)

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Offline coachgregory

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Pressure - How it happens in the 63
« on: February 05, 2019, 02:25:43 PM »
I had a great weekend in Corpus Christi working with a team on the 63 defense for their tournament season.   We worked all weekend (Saturday/Sunday) on the 63 defense.

I wanted to make sure I went over little things that really help any defense to play well.  One thing I pointed out was that scheme can't overcome desire...meaning that every player on the defense needs to be SELFLESS and RELENTLESS.  Selfless in that you have to do your job, fulfill the roll you are assigned and not try and do something outside of that scope.  That might mean you go games without making a big play or getting a moment to shine but your job is allowing others to shine.  Do the best at your job even when you are not getting the fanfare and enjoy the accomplishments of the team and others knowing you had a part in it because you did your job.  Relentless in your attitude to be better, to perform on EVERY PLAY.  Don't take a practice period off, don't take a play off...  Bring your best on every play.  Play aggressive but play with good stance, good alignment, and good technique.  RELENTLESS and SMART!

The defense allows you to generate pressure from a lot of different points on the field.  At the base the STACK call provides a lot of pressure vertically into the backfield from the line of scrimmage and the edges. It gives you a essentially eight man pressure filling all the gaps from outside in.  The technique of the DE allows us to compress the backfield from the edge aiming at the deep near hip of the deep back while the OLB when he stunts/blitzs he is aiming for the near hip of the QB.  The defensive line compresses the line of scrimmage by penetrating as quickly as possible and once they get penetration past the heels of the offensive linemen they locate the ball. 

Notice in STACK you have four linemen penetrating past the heels of the OLINE and breaking down to locate the ball.  This eliminates open gaps that the ball can leak into due to over penetration by the line.  Next the defensive end is tracking the deep back's near hip into the backfield until he identifies the ball/play.  This allows us to compress the edges quickly and it forces the offense to get the ball out of the backfield quickly. Playaction and slow developing counter/reverses have a hard time working against this defense.    Coupled with the ability to move the OLB to the A, B, and C gap to attack the near hip of the QB it puts pressure on the backfield from the both the edge and the middle (at different gaps on both sides).  Two DE's both aiming at the near hip of the deep back.  Two OLB's, lined up in different gaps in their stacks, aiming for the near hip of the QB.  The eliminates it being vulnerable to option plays as the DE and OLB have predefined targets on their blitz until they locate the ball from both sides.  STACK is the base of our pressure and we build our pressure out from the four basic STACK calls.

Moving forward within the stacks we have an AUTO call when we have an open TACKLE, meaning there is no tightend covering him and only a split end at most on the near side.  In this case the OLB calls GAP an this aligns the OLB in the C gap while the DT and DG align in the middle of the B and A gaps.  This is a base stack call but it is also an automatic call when we see this look so that we can put immediate edge pressure on the QB from the open side.  With the DG, DT, and OLB, and DE it puts pressure on any formation that shows an open with only a split end on that side.

Once the stacks understand the concept around the calls and using the auto gap we can introduce the GAP calls.  Which is simply an expansion on the GAP calls so that we can move the OLB around on a GAP call to isolate him in a gap against a weaker/slower offensive lineman.  Remember the OLB is taught to use his stack calls to get him in a position to get to the QB's near hip while the ball is in his hands or being handed off.  The point is to compress the line (DL) and get to the ball (DE/OLB) in the stacks. 

Moving on from the stack calls we can generate additional pressure using the Back Five (Mike and/or Cornerbacks).  The additional stack calls put us in a READ mode and from different alignments.  It is important to discuss this a bit to understand why we do it this way.  If we see a #2 receiver that is extended from the offensive line (not a TE) like a slot receiver we automatically call SPREAD and this means the OLB moves to a spot at their same depth (3 to 5 yards from LOS) but tilt inside so their numbers face the QB and they split the difference between the DE and the #2 receiver from the outside.  We also have instances where we see a TE and a WB or  a nasty aligned TE and we need to bump the OLB out from his stacked position that is a SLIDE call and he slides out to a spot that splits the middle of the DE and the DT.   This is also an automatic call but at the younger age groups I usually don't make either of these automatic because at 9 and under I don't believe most offenses can out formation our pressure.  At age 10 I think that changes and I do make both of these automatic adjustment calls.  The key here is we are building a defensive triangle of sorts with the OLB at the tip reading the backfield (run read OUTSIDE/AT/AWAY and if pass dropping into zone coverage and reading the QB's up field shoulder). 

These are basic READ (RED) calls:  RED (stacked), SPREAD, and SLIDE for our OLB's to align on the offense.  SLIDE and SPREAD are automatic adjustments at age 10 and up.  Now that we have that covered we can discuss our MIKE and CORNERBACK pressure packages.

MIKE
MIKE is our open defender.  He is  our SHOOTER in the perimeter triangle in run support and his read is INSIDE/AT/AWAY which compliments the OLB's reads of OUTSIDE/AT/AWAY.  We have three blitz calls and two coverage calls for our MIKE.

MICKEY - is an inside blitz call where the MIKE creeps down over the center and blitzs either A gap.  I teach my MIKE to attack the snapping arm side A gap first.  It is often the weakest A gap.  His landmark is the near hip of the QB.

MOUSE - mouse is an outside edge blitze with the MIKE creeping down to the inside of the DE (field side is often our base). His aiming point is the near hip of the QB and he works through the heels of the last offensive player on the line to get to the QB.
 
MONGO - we have the DE move inside and the MIKE become the hunter (takes the DE's role) of attacking the near hip of the DEEP BACK while the DE attacks the near hip of the QB. 

With this we can also add TWIST to any of the two outside calls and this changes the blitz so that the INSIDE DEFENDER attacks the near hip of the deep back and the OUTSIDE DEFENDER delays for a moment and then attacks off the heels of the inside defender at the near hip of the QB.  It does two things for our blitz; it changes who is attacking the DEEP BACK and who is attacking the QB and changes the landmark for the guy hunting the QB.  It really forces olines to be disciplined in their pass pro drops and if not (which most youth pass pro is not very structured) this simple call puts pressure on the C/D gap edge using the MIKE as the additional blitzer.

Cornerback

Whenever we see chance to send a CB on a blitz I like to use them as they often quick and fast kids that don't get a chance to get involved in the pressure game as the rest of the defenders.   We have a basic rule that if we are on a short field and no pass threat on the CB's side we will blitz him.  So no wide receiver, wingback, or a TE that is a passing threat we will send our corner.  We only have two calls but I have experimented with a third call which I will post but this call is not something have done a lot.  However two coaching staffs on seperate teams have used it with success....it is just not something I have used or really field tested.

COUGAR - this is the same call as the MICKEY call but with the cornerback.  CB is aligned inside of the DE and attacking the near hip of the QB.

CONGO - this is the same call as the MOUSE call but with the cornerback.  CB is aligned outside and hunting the near hip of the QB while the DE is inside and hunting the near hip of the QB.

TWIST can also be used for both calls above as well.  So this gives you a lot of outside blitz options from the edge with the calls above.

The other additional call that I have not used in game but other staffs have is for the CB to move over the center and blitz like the MIKE. 

CHINA - tells the short side CB to execute the MICKEY blitz (which leaves the MIKE behind him still.  Sneaky call and if you have a really aggressive CB that likes to play like a LB at the line of scrimmage it can be a fun call.

OLB calls in SLIDE and SPREAD

Then final two calls are made from the SLIDE and the SPREAD calls where we want to look like we are in READ but then go into blitz.  In both cases we align and then creep to a spot that will allow us to blitz and have a chance to make a play.

STORM - OLB blitz from SPREAD  - OLB aligns and then when OLINE is in a down position they creep and blitz like a TWIST.  DE attacks near hip of deep back and OLB attack near hip of QB off the heels of the DE.
STEAM - OLB blitz from SLIDE -  OLB aligns and then when OLIINE is in a down position they creep and blitz like a TWIST.  DE attacks near hip of deep back and OLB attack near hip of QB off the heels of the DE.

Yes you can make calls to a specific corner or OLB in all the cases above but I leave that to you how you want to make those calls.  Bear in mind our base for PRESSURE is always STACK, we teach the GAP calls and MIKE and CORNER calls as we are ready for them and need them.  I don't use all the calls in every game and a matter of fact I implement a package of calls that are based on the offense we facing.  I try to take away a teams best 3 running plays and best 2 passing plays. My reasoning is simple if I can take away the offenses best five plays and force them deeper into their play book they are probably not as efficient or effective with them.

So some additional calls that you probably have not see in my PDFs are below for pressure:

DOOR - it is a call to the wide/field side DE to essentially fan out wide.  He shoots up the field at a slight outside angle aiming at a spot that will put him at the depth of the deepest backs near hip.  This can be used with the STACK calls or the CORNER and MIKE calls.  If MONGO/CONGO the CB and MIKE replace the DE in the above FAN technique.  This allows the DE to play a really explosive RB as it puts him at his depth but fanned out more in space to keep him inside of the DE.    Meanwhile you can bring pressure from the inside on the near hip of the QB.

DART - same as above except the OLB on any stack/steam/storm call attacks the near hip of the deepest back.  Against  a team that has a workhorse running back that has wheels to get outside it allows us to FAN him and attack him from the inside.  Used with the MIKE/CORNER outside blitz calls you can put a lot of pressure on the field side against a top running back.

This is our entire pressure package excluding line/OLB stunts (TORNADO/TWISTER) which I can discuss in another post along with making the defense into a true zone blitz defense with the use of DOG/DOT calls.

Jack
« Last Edit: February 05, 2019, 03:39:42 PM by coachgregory »
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Offline tnert2003

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Re: Pressure - How it happens in the 63
« Reply #1 on: February 05, 2019, 07:07:13 PM »
Thank You Coach Gregory for coming to CC, TX. We appreciate you taking time out of your schedule to help our players and coaches understand how its done. Priceless Information. Meeting you was an honor.

Offline coachgregory

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Re: Pressure - How it happens in the 63
« Reply #2 on: February 05, 2019, 08:23:06 PM »
Thank You Coach Gregory for coming to CC, TX. We appreciate you taking time out of your schedule to help our players and coaches understand how its done. Priceless Information. Meeting you was an honor.

I really enjoyed meeting all of you and getting to work with your boys.  Some amazing talent on that team and those boys have a lot of room to grow.  If you need anything from me at all please don't hesitate to ask.

Jack
Exsisto Fortis, Exsisto Validus