Author Topic: USA Tackling  (Read 699 times)

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Offline gumby_in_co

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Re: USA Tackling
« Reply #30 on: August 11, 2019, 07:04:58 PM »
I may feel differently about this some day, but right now, I believe that coaching form tackling is a waste of time. I watch a LOT of film. I watch every single play of our 8-11 games per season, Fall and Spring . . . multiple times. I also watch every opponent and their opponent in our scout film. It's very rare that we play a team without watching a scout film first. Maybe the first game of every season.

I don't see many "form tackles" aka "gator roll tackles" aka "hawk tackles".  So now I look at what gets ball carriers to the ground. Or more specifically, what fails to get ball carriers to the ground. In order:

1) overwhelmingly, failing to get close enough to the ball carrier to even attempt a tackle. Probably 98% of the time, the guy will score if you don't get in position to tackle him. Running out of bounds, tripping, or a penalty are the only things stopping him. Duh!, right? Then why aren't we spending most of our time teaching our defenders how to get to the ball?  Well, starting about 1/2 way through last Fall (2nd graders), through this Spring (Freshman) and into this Fall (3rd graders), getting to the ball is a focus.

2) 1 on 1 tackles. I don't like match ups where success is dependent on your guy winning a 1 on 1 battle. The outcome of those battles are only 50% within your control. So I view any tackle with less than 3 tacklers involved as an abject failure. Can anyone tell me the proper tackling form for a 3 on 1 tackle? Didn't think so. So why spend time coaching a technique that I consider a failure? I've found that 3 guys tackling the ball carrier is about 98% effective. So we spend a lot of time with that. What if little Jimmy gets there first and makes a solo tackle? Am I mad? It depends on where Joey and Billy are (and everyone other defender) when the whistle blows. I use a "2 whistle" method when are tackling in a group or team drill. First whistle sounds when the ball is down, followed by "one one thousand, two one thousand" and the 2nd whistle. Any defender not within a yard of the ball or at a dead sprint to get there on the 2nd whistle owes the team push ups. I found this invaluable to fix those defenders who decide to lock horns with a blocker and try to win that pissing contest. Want to defeat a blocker? Fine. 5 push ups. I haven't found a player yet who is willing to pay that price. Most importantly, I learned on Friday that I can get 11 3rd graders to within a yard of the ball 2 seconds after the whistle blows. This tells me that I can have half that number on the ball when the first whistle blows and the remainder there one second later.

3) failure to maintain control of the runner until the whistle. This is the one I'm fighting right now and will have a chat with the coaching staff before our next practice. The natural tendency for our guys during a tackle is to make contact and try to drag the BC to the ground. For this reason, I'm strongly thinking about killing the "roll" part of the tackle and emphasizing "drive for 5" or even "hang on for dear life". If the first player to arrive makes contact and grabs cloth, leg, or his own wrist and hangs on, this greatly increases the chances that a teammate will arrive to help (ensuring he gets there  #1 and helps with the tackle #2).

I watched too many 2nd grade games get decided by a fast kid, a juker or a strong kid who either drops his shoulder or stiff arms. If we address 1), 2) and 3), I'm guessing this all goes away.
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Offline CoachDP

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Re: USA Tackling
« Reply #31 on: August 11, 2019, 08:57:40 PM »
I may feel differently about this some day, but right now, I believe that coaching form tackling is a waste of time.

--Depends on your definition of a form tackle.  For us, all of our tackle drills were "form tackles."  Maybe not in the sense that we were going, "A, B, C, D" or "Feet, Hips, Breakdown..." or whatever USA Football is trying to dump on us.  But we were always looking for (and coaching) the good tackle.  So the "good tackle" was the "form tackle."

Then why aren't we spending most of our time teaching our defenders how to get to the ball?

--Because it's usually an afterthought.  Sometimes it's a neverthought.  However, tackling without pursuit is pointless.

I don't like match ups where success is dependent on your guy winning a 1 on 1 battle. The outcome of those battles are only 50% within your control. So I view any tackle with less than 3 tacklers involved as an abject failure.

--Hello!  Bingo. ^ This.

Can anyone tell me the proper tackling form for a 3 on 1 tackle?

--Absolutely.  Get there first and take home a souvenir.

I've found that 3 guys tackling the ball carrier is about 98% effective. So we spend a lot of time with that.

--Hmmm.  Maybe I should change "Tee Time" to "Three Time"...

What if little Jimmy gets there first and makes a solo tackle? Am I mad? It depends on where Joey and Billy are (and everyone other defender) when the whistle blows.

--I'd better have 10 more in pursuit at the whistle.  And in practice, all 11 have to give the ball-carrier a "love tap" before he returns to the huddle.

I found this invaluable to fix those defenders who decide to lock horns with a blocker and try to win that pissing contest. Want to defeat a blocker? Fine. 5 push ups.

--That's where our "Invisible Offense" came in....

For this reason, I'm strongly thinking about killing the "roll" part of the tackle and emphasizing "drive for 5" or even "hang on for dear life".

--No rolls for us.  You seen our vids Lar, and you won't see us roll.

Good points, all.

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement:
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Offline gumby_in_co

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Re: USA Tackling
« Reply #32 on: August 11, 2019, 09:39:10 PM »
--Depends on your definition of a form tackle.  For us, all of our tackle drills were "form tackles."  Maybe not in the sense that we were going, "A, B, C, D" or "Feet, Hips, Breakdown..." or whatever USA Football is trying to dump on us.  But we were always looking for (and coaching) the good tackle.  So the "good tackle" was the "form tackle."

I guess what I'm getting at is that for me, a "good tackle" is one that gets the ball carrier to the ground and leaves him pondering his future carrying the ball. I have the same disdain for the term "arm tackle" as you do (and now I do) for "watch the ball". Arm tackle? Not ideal, no, but just yelling "NO ARM TACKLES" does little to address the underlying problem that the defender wasn't close enough to put a shoulder on the ball carrier. Personally, if the "arm tackle" gets the guy on the ground, I'm happy. If, the ball carrier is running through arm tackles, then I see the problem as "not enough guys in a position to hit him".

Quote
And in practice, all 11 have to give the ball-carrier a "love tap" before he returns to the huddle.

Stolen. Maybe if we don't get 11 "love taps" in a designated time period, the whole defense does push ups.

In regards to the 3 on 1 form tackle, what I'm getting at is that there is no "swoop, gather, ponder, appreciate, contemplate" going on. And THAT is what I hate about USA Football's or anyone's approach to form tackling. Thinking is a defense's worst enemy. Clark did a wonderful job of pointing out that we, as coaches need to watch, re-watch, take notes and study to know all the steps in the USA Football tackling method. Even then, we probably need index cards to remind us. NOT what I want going through a defender's head with a live football running around.
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Offline tiger46

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Re: USA Tackling
« Reply #33 on: August 11, 2019, 11:59:45 PM »
Gumby,

You're hitting in the same areas that I had thought about. Even the best of tackle drills are still just that- drills. In a game, real defense is about swarming to the ball, etc...  Of course we want our defenders to win any 1vs.1 tackle situation.  But we want our defense swarming the BC so that 1vs1 situations are severely limited.

I don't know of any full-proof perfect tackle method(s). So, I teach what I teach.  We use the 2 sec. drill and all of those things, too.  But, no tackle that we teach is the perfect answer for all situations. Neither are what we teach our BCs the perfect ways to defeat any tackle at anytime.  And, DC may get scewed success/failure rates by using controlled drills during a practice (lab results) validate a certain way of defeating tackles. It's not that any of it doesn't work.  But, we can't dictate what the situation is on the field.
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Offline Coach E

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Re: USA Tackling
« Reply #34 on: August 12, 2019, 10:14:51 AM »
I may feel differently about this some day, but right now, I believe that coaching form tackling is a waste of time. I watch a LOT of film. I watch every single play of our 8-11 games per season, Fall and Spring . . . multiple times. I also watch every opponent and their opponent in our scout film. It's very rare that we play a team without watching a scout film first. Maybe the first game of every season.

I don't see many "form tackles" aka "gator roll tackles" aka "hawk tackles".  So now I look at what gets ball carriers to the ground. Or more specifically, what fails to get ball carriers to the ground. In order:

1) overwhelmingly, failing to get close enough to the ball carrier to even attempt a tackle. Probably 98% of the time, the guy will score if you don't get in position to tackle him. Running out of bounds, tripping, or a penalty are the only things stopping him. Duh!, right? Then why aren't we spending most of our time teaching our defenders how to get to the ball?  Well, starting about 1/2 way through last Fall (2nd graders), through this Spring (Freshman) and into this Fall (3rd graders), getting to the ball is a focus.

2) 1 on 1 tackles. I don't like match ups where success is dependent on your guy winning a 1 on 1 battle. The outcome of those battles are only 50% within your control. So I view any tackle with less than 3 tacklers involved as an abject failure. Can anyone tell me the proper tackling form for a 3 on 1 tackle? Didn't think so. So why spend time coaching a technique that I consider a failure? I've found that 3 guys tackling the ball carrier is about 98% effective. So we spend a lot of time with that. What if little Jimmy gets there first and makes a solo tackle? Am I mad? It depends on where Joey and Billy are (and everyone other defender) when the whistle blows. I use a "2 whistle" method when are tackling in a group or team drill. First whistle sounds when the ball is down, followed by "one one thousand, two one thousand" and the 2nd whistle. Any defender not within a yard of the ball or at a dead sprint to get there on the 2nd whistle owes the team push ups. I found this invaluable to fix those defenders who decide to lock horns with a blocker and try to win that pissing contest. Want to defeat a blocker? Fine. 5 push ups. I haven't found a player yet who is willing to pay that price. Most importantly, I learned on Friday that I can get 11 3rd graders to within a yard of the ball 2 seconds after the whistle blows. This tells me that I can have half that number on the ball when the first whistle blows and the remainder there one second later.

3) failure to maintain control of the runner until the whistle. This is the one I'm fighting right now and will have a chat with the coaching staff before our next practice. The natural tendency for our guys during a tackle is to make contact and try to drag the BC to the ground. For this reason, I'm strongly thinking about killing the "roll" part of the tackle and emphasizing "drive for 5" or even "hang on for dear life". If the first player to arrive makes contact and grabs cloth, leg, or his own wrist and hangs on, this greatly increases the chances that a teammate will arrive to help (ensuring he gets there  #1 and helps with the tackle #2).

I watched too many 2nd grade games get decided by a fast kid, a juker or a strong kid who either drops his shoulder or stiff arms. If we address 1), 2) and 3), I'm guessing this all goes away.

I like this. What are you doing for your "drills" now?
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Offline gumby_in_co

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Re: USA Tackling
« Reply #35 on: August 12, 2019, 11:46:27 AM »
I like this. What are you doing for your "drills" now?

Thursday was our first day of contact. I believe we did 6 drills.

1) First was an all hands, fit and freeze drill. This was the "proper" USA Football fit, minus the "scoop, wallow, fascinate, analyze" stuff. Two steps to fit your buddy, then freeze until a coach checks your fit. Looking for straight backs, foot position, grip, etc. Then I finished it by having them "walk" their guy for about 5 seconds or so. That will most likely be the last time we do that all season.

2, 3 and 4) Then, we broke into 3 stations. All contact on bags. Slow to fast, really emphasize the aggression once they are comfortable. No need to diagram the drills, because anyone can set up "tackle the bag" drills.

5) The "Murray Drill" named after a kid of ours who invented it. This will be an EDD.  Start with a 4 yard box made of cones.

                          ^   ^   ^ T
                          ^         ^
                          ^   ^   ^ BC
On "hit" both the T and the BC will enter the box. Anything goes for the BC, but he must stay within the box. Drill is over when the BC is tackled.  Some kids will slowly stalk the RB, so you have to be on top of that. We ran 3 boxes at once and I rotated between them looking for good and bad. Make sure all coaches are on the same page for correcting/helping players who are struggling. For us, the coaching point will be to hang on for 5 seconds, or run him out of the box. This is the drill where I identified our tendency to fall down and try to drag the player down and where I realized I need to kill the "roll" part of the tackle. I will mix it up with 2 on 1, 1 on 2, 2 on 2 . . . whatever. I will also add a twist where I will add another tackler (and maybe 2) in a 1 on 1 after the first tackler grabs ahold of the BC. This will reinforce maintaining control of the BC until help arrives.

6) All hands, 25 man tackle drill. Pretty much Oklahoma in stations. Station 1 is 1 on 1. Station 2 is 3 O vs 2 D. Station 3 is 3 O vs 4 D. Station 4 is 4 O vs 5 D. Doesn't have to be perfect. Each rep, each player rotates right and to the back. Furthest back and right player rotates to the next station.

Friday was defensive install day.

I throw out an "eyeball" defense where I place kids where it make sense to me, then we go right into our pursuit drill. Cones on the sideline every 5 yards. We run sweeps at them, each coach picking a group of 2-3 defenders to watch and keep an eye on their pursuit angle. When they get to the runner, they run behind him and give him a love tap on the shoulder. Stress not slowing him down because you want every defender to understand their angle is different. I realized too late that the easy way to do this is have one coach per cone so you can see your group coming to you, but whatever. This is an every day defensive drill. What you are looking for is hesitation, guessing and loops.
Hesitation is bad because . . . duh.
Guessing is bad because the offense has a whole playbook of plays going in different directions.
Loops are the main thing. I get them to "bust" themselves if they realize they had to adjust their path to the ball because they were too shallow or too deep.  I demonstrate the "shortest distance" concept.
I rotate kids in and out, looking for kids who understand the angles and the kids who don't.

From there, we went scout O vs our D. Live and full contact.  I have no idea what Mahonz and Lonnie are running at us and neither does the defense. Defensive coaches watch their group of 2-3 players. I was looking for a Reaper and Dogs. We used the "2 whistle" drill to emphasize relentless pursuit and prosecution of the ball. I will be adding DP's "love tap" to it.

Going forward, we will do the Murray drill, Pursuit and Team pretty much every day. I will use drills that I've done in the past to address concerns/problem areas, or I will invent them. I have a 5 cone Gang tackle drill I will use. Cones set up at different distances to a coach holding a bag. On "Hit", everyone tackles the bag. The first guys to arrive will learn that they are going to get hit by their buddies and will eventually learn to expect it and enjoy it because that is what success feels like. Late arrivers will learn that they are going to hit their buddies and will learn to enjoy that as well.

I will tape an old jersey to a large square bag. I will have player fit the bag, then try to yank the bag away, dragging the player down the field, challenging them to hold on as long as they can. Hopefully, they will learn that it is MUCH easier to hang on when you are on your feet.

Then on game day, we run an angle tackle drill to get the blood and snot flowing.

The focus will be relentless, swarming pursuit and prosecution of the ball carrier.
Mission Statement: To create a Football Family that our players and parents can't imagine not being a part of.

Offline Coach E

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Re: USA Tackling
« Reply #36 on: August 12, 2019, 12:59:57 PM »
Thursday was our first day of contact. I believe we did 6 drills.

1) First was an all hands, fit and freeze drill. This was the "proper" USA Football fit, minus the "scoop, wallow, fascinate, analyze" stuff. Two steps to fit your buddy, then freeze until a coach checks your fit. Looking for straight backs, foot position, grip, etc. Then I finished it by having them "walk" their guy for about 5 seconds or so. That will most likely be the last time we do that all season.

2, 3 and 4) Then, we broke into 3 stations. All contact on bags. Slow to fast, really emphasize the aggression once they are comfortable. No need to diagram the drills, because anyone can set up "tackle the bag" drills.

5) The "Murray Drill" named after a kid of ours who invented it. This will be an EDD.  Start with a 4 yard box made of cones.

                          ^   ^   ^ T
                          ^         ^
                          ^   ^   ^ BC
On "hit" both the T and the BC will enter the box. Anything goes for the BC, but he must stay within the box. Drill is over when the BC is tackled.  Some kids will slowly stalk the RB, so you have to be on top of that. We ran 3 boxes at once and I rotated between them looking for good and bad. Make sure all coaches are on the same page for correcting/helping players who are struggling. For us, the coaching point will be to hang on for 5 seconds, or run him out of the box. This is the drill where I identified our tendency to fall down and try to drag the player down and where I realized I need to kill the "roll" part of the tackle. I will mix it up with 2 on 1, 1 on 2, 2 on 2 . . . whatever. I will also add a twist where I will add another tackler (and maybe 2) in a 1 on 1 after the first tackler grabs ahold of the BC. This will reinforce maintaining control of the BC until help arrives.

6) All hands, 25 man tackle drill. Pretty much Oklahoma in stations. Station 1 is 1 on 1. Station 2 is 3 O vs 2 D. Station 3 is 3 O vs 4 D. Station 4 is 4 O vs 5 D. Doesn't have to be perfect. Each rep, each player rotates right and to the back. Furthest back and right player rotates to the next station.

Friday was defensive install day.

I throw out an "eyeball" defense where I place kids where it make sense to me, then we go right into our pursuit drill. Cones on the sideline every 5 yards. We run sweeps at them, each coach picking a group of 2-3 defenders to watch and keep an eye on their pursuit angle. When they get to the runner, they run behind him and give him a love tap on the shoulder. Stress not slowing him down because you want every defender to understand their angle is different. I realized too late that the easy way to do this is have one coach per cone so you can see your group coming to you, but whatever. This is an every day defensive drill. What you are looking for is hesitation, guessing and loops.
Hesitation is bad because . . . duh.
Guessing is bad because the offense has a whole playbook of plays going in different directions.
Loops are the main thing. I get them to "bust" themselves if they realize they had to adjust their path to the ball because they were too shallow or too deep.  I demonstrate the "shortest distance" concept.
I rotate kids in and out, looking for kids who understand the angles and the kids who don't.

From there, we went scout O vs our D. Live and full contact.  I have no idea what Mahonz and Lonnie are running at us and neither does the defense. Defensive coaches watch their group of 2-3 players. I was looking for a Reaper and Dogs. We used the "2 whistle" drill to emphasize relentless pursuit and prosecution of the ball. I will be adding DP's "love tap" to it.

Going forward, we will do the Murray drill, Pursuit and Team pretty much every day. I will use drills that I've done in the past to address concerns/problem areas, or I will invent them. I have a 5 cone Gang tackle drill I will use. Cones set up at different distances to a coach holding a bag. On "Hit", everyone tackles the bag. The first guys to arrive will learn that they are going to get hit by their buddies and will eventually learn to expect it and enjoy it because that is what success feels like. Late arrivers will learn that they are going to hit their buddies and will learn to enjoy that as well.

I will tape an old jersey to a large square bag. I will have player fit the bag, then try to yank the bag away, dragging the player down the field, challenging them to hold on as long as they can. Hopefully, they will learn that it is MUCH easier to hang on when you are on your feet.

Then on game day, we run an angle tackle drill to get the blood and snot flowing.

The focus will be relentless, swarming pursuit and prosecution of the ball carrier.

Thank you!
The object of life is not to be on the side of the majority, but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane.
- Marcus Aurelius

Offline tiger46

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Re: USA Tackling
« Reply #37 on: August 12, 2019, 01:08:49 PM »
I may feel differently about this some day, but right now, I believe that coaching form tackling is a waste of time. I watch a LOT of film. I watch every single play of our 8-11 games per season, Fall and Spring . . . multiple times. I also watch every opponent and their opponent in our scout film. It's very rare that we play a team without watching a scout film first. Maybe the first game of every season.

I don't see many "form tackles" aka "gator roll tackles" aka "hawk tackles".  So now I look at what gets ball carriers to the ground. Or more specifically, what fails to get ball carriers to the ground. In order:

1) overwhelmingly, failing to get close enough to the ball carrier to even attempt a tackle. Probably 98% of the time, the guy will score if you don't get in position to tackle him. Running out of bounds, tripping, or a penalty are the only things stopping him. Duh!, right? Then why aren't we spending most of our time teaching our defenders how to get to the ball?  Well, starting about 1/2 way through last Fall (2nd graders), through this Spring (Freshman) and into this Fall (3rd graders), getting to the ball is a focus.

2) 1 on 1 tackles. I don't like match ups where success is dependent on your guy winning a 1 on 1 battle. The outcome of those battles are only 50% within your control. So I view any tackle with less than 3 tacklers involved as an abject failure. Can anyone tell me the proper tackling form for a 3 on 1 tackle? Didn't think so. So why spend time coaching a technique that I consider a failure? I've found that 3 guys tackling the ball carrier is about 98% effective. So we spend a lot of time with that. What if little Jimmy gets there first and makes a solo tackle? Am I mad? It depends on where Joey and Billy are (and everyone other defender) when the whistle blows. I use a "2 whistle" method when are tackling in a group or team drill. First whistle sounds when the ball is down, followed by "one one thousand, two one thousand" and the 2nd whistle. Any defender not within a yard of the ball or at a dead sprint to get there on the 2nd whistle owes the team push ups. I found this invaluable to fix those defenders who decide to lock horns with a blocker and try to win that pissing contest. Want to defeat a blocker? Fine. 5 push ups. I haven't found a player yet who is willing to pay that price. Most importantly, I learned on Friday that I can get 11 3rd graders to within a yard of the ball 2 seconds after the whistle blows. This tells me that I can have half that number on the ball when the first whistle blows and the remainder there one second later.

3) failure to maintain control of the runner until the whistle. This is the one I'm fighting right now and will have a chat with the coaching staff before our next practice. The natural tendency for our guys during a tackle is to make contact and try to drag the BC to the ground. For this reason, I'm strongly thinking about killing the "roll" part of the tackle and emphasizing "drive for 5" or even "hang on for dear life". If the first player to arrive makes contact and grabs cloth, leg, or his own wrist and hangs on, this greatly increases the chances that a teammate will arrive to help (ensuring he gets there  #1 and helps with the tackle #2).

I watched too many 2nd grade games get decided by a fast kid, a juker or a strong kid who either drops his shoulder or stiff arms. If we address 1), 2) and 3), I'm guessing this all goes away.

This is probably taking this thread off on a tangent. But, here goes... When we thought about tackling as more of a mindset more so than some super-duper secret ninja technique (drills CD included. A $19 value for free!) we seemed to have gotten better at tackling.  So, say for us, we have our Three Orders: First Order- My Ball! Second Order- Hit 'Em and Hurt 'Em! Third Order- Killshot!
Some of  the things we can do to address these things. First Order- Whose Ball, Sumo, Enduro, Panther Pit(2 blockers with handshields, 1 BC, 1 Tackler)  Second Order- Panther Pit, Lead Block Drill, Cisar's Splatter Tackle, CoachDP's Executioner, Killing Floor Third Order- It has nothing to do with killing the BC. Kill the football's forward momentum! A de-cleater tackle, gator roll, body block tackle through the shins, drive the BC backwards, hang on for dear life, whatever... STOP THE FOOTBALL FROM GOING FORWARD!! 

To emphasize the shoulder drive on a gator roll, we have our BC chop his feet or move at a brisk walk. Tackler bear-crawls into the tackle.  The faster he can bear-crawl and drive his shoulder through the tackle before shooting his hands and hips, the better.  Low speed arm tackles tend to get broken. They start to learn to aim and really drive their shoulder into the tackle.  Another of the things that we do that I like is to just let the BC and tackler wrestle. But, it's wrestling with a purpose. One way that we do it is to have a short angle tackle (2yrds distance at most).  The BC is trying to breakthrough or drag the tackler. BC can spin, shove, stiff-arm, whatever... The tackler can gator roll, chest plate tackle, etc... There's not enough momentum for either to immediately knock the other down on impact. So, it ends up becoming a contest of wrestling, will-power and determination.  The tackler is instructed to always keep his back to his goal line.  Shake the BC back & forth while driving.  If the BC spins, spin with him and turn him back around so that your(tackler) back is to your goal line again. Tacklers tend to want to try to drag a BC backwards. The BC is leaning forward, pumping his legs.  That's too great of an advantage for the BC.  Tackler, get body to body and twist the BC back around. Too many coaches are concerned with the big hit.  They forget that a good stick and drive backwards is just as effective. We love big hits, too. We just love swarming to the football even more.  We frequently have gator rolls where the tackler is only squeezing one leg. But, he gets to his knees, turns his back to his goal line and starts driving! BC falls down or starts hopping backwards. To us, that's a Killshot!

Tackling the football is quite effective, too.  Some of our more experienced Whose-Ballers will tackle an inexperienced player's football with full body weight, roll away and escape.  And, it is a joy to watch when you see it happen during a real game.

“It is easier to build strong children than to repair broken men. ”  ― Frederick Douglass

Offline CoachDP

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Re: USA Tackling
« Reply #38 on: August 12, 2019, 01:28:31 PM »
Tackling the football is quite effective, too.  Some of our more experienced Whose-Ballers will tackle an inexperienced player's football with full body weight, roll away and escape.  And, it is a joy to watch when you see it happen during a real game.

^

--Dave
"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement:
"I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go." #BattleReady newhope

Offline gumby_in_co

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Re: USA Tackling
« Reply #39 on: August 15, 2019, 12:17:09 AM »
--I'd better have 10 more in pursuit at the whistle.  And in practice, all 11 have to give the ball-carrier a "love tap" before he returns to the huddle.

I implemented this Tuesday night. I think we did 2 sets of push ups, fired a player from defense for walking as I counted down, then the problem went away only to be replaced by another problem. However, the new problem is one we always hope for as coaches. I had to tell them to dial back the aggression a little because the "love taps" were encroaching on "personal foul - late hit" territory. I told them as much. Coaches much prefer players that need to be held back over players you constantly have to prod.

Another "accidental" bonus. We're getting a ton of conditioning the way we're running team defense. Play starts and every one is in full pursuit. First whistle blows and my 5 second countdown starts. Any stragglers are sprinting to get in their "love tap". Then, I call "reload" and another coach, who's pet peeve is not reloading fast enough starts his 5 second countdown. If they aren't back in position in 5 seconds, they do 5 up/downs. So we have kids sprinting to the ball, then sprinting back to position while getting lots of meaningful reps. 1 coach watching 1/2 of the pressure group. Another watching the other half. A third watching his half of the cover group and a 4th watching his half. Coach until scout QB (HS helper) starts cadence, then you are done coaching.
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Offline CoachDP

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Re: USA Tackling
« Reply #40 on: August 15, 2019, 06:32:38 AM »
I implemented this Tuesday night. I think we did 2 sets of push ups, fired a player from defense for walking as I counted down, then the problem went away only to be replaced by another problem. However, the new problem is one we always hope for as coaches. I had to tell them to dial back the aggression a little because the "love taps" were encroaching on "personal foul - late hit" territory. I told them as much. Coaches much prefer players that need to be held back over players you constantly have to prod.

Another "accidental" bonus. We're getting a ton of conditioning the way we're running team defense. Play starts and every one is in full pursuit. First whistle blows and my 5 second countdown starts. Any stragglers are sprinting to get in their "love tap". Then, I call "reload" and another coach, who's pet peeve is not reloading fast enough starts his 5 second countdown. If they aren't back in position in 5 seconds, they do 5 up/downs. So we have kids sprinting to the ball, then sprinting back to position while getting lots of meaningful reps. 1 coach watching 1/2 of the pressure group. Another watching the other half. A third watching his half of the cover group and a 4th watching his half. Coach until scout QB (HS helper) starts cadence, then you are done coaching.

Lar, I think you’re the only coach (that I know of) who has implemented our pursuit, so this is the first time I have ever received feedback on the drill.  You had to “dial back the aggression.”  lol. Our ball-carriers hated this drill.  ;D  I’ve never thought about the conditioning element of this drill; only the results.  Regardless, good stuff.

—Dave
« Last Edit: August 15, 2019, 10:57:45 AM by CoachDP »
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Offline tiger46

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QB
« Reply #41 on: August 15, 2019, 08:00:16 AM »
I implemented this Tuesday night. I think we did 2 sets of push ups, fired a player from defense for walking as I counted down, then the problem went away only to be replaced by another problem. However, the new problem is one we always hope for as coaches. I had to tell them to dial back the aggression a little because the "love taps" were encroaching on "personal foul - late hit" territory. I told them as much. Coaches much prefer players that need to be held back over players you constantly have to prod.

Another "accidental" bonus. We're getting a ton of conditioning the way we're running team defense. Play starts and every one is in full pursuit. First whistle blows and my 5 second countdown starts. Any stragglers are sprinting to get in their "love tap". Then, I call "reload" and another coach, who's pet peeve is not reloading fast enough starts his 5 second countdown. If they aren't back in position in 5 seconds, they do 5 up/downs. So we have kids sprinting to the ball, then sprinting back to position while getting lots of meaningful reps. 1 coach watching 1/2 of the pressure group. Another watching the other half. A third watching his half of the cover group and a 4th watching his half. Coach until scout QB (HS helper) starts cadence, then you are done coaching.

Yesterday, for team pursuit, we ran a much more simplified version of this star burst play with MPRs and tackle dummies as the QB & front line.  The QB was there just to give the Center snaps. Behind them were 5 players in the huddle numbered 0 > 5.  We would designate who gets the ball in the huddle and burst out on the QB's cadence.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JG6xYM8fe48

Defenders had to locate the BC and neutralize him. No pads. So, No tackling. But, they had to get him wrapped up and all forward momentum stopped. Anyone lagging or jogging got to do up/downs and replaced. If the BC scored or made a large gain the entire defense did up/downs.
We rotated BC's, defenders, etc... 

We had plenty of water on hand. We got a few whiners about the heat and being thirsty, anyway.  So, I stopped the drill. Gave everyone plenty of water.  And, then I proceeded to CoD for 15 mins. Only we call it Circle of Champions. Weeded out the whiners and the mentally weak.   During the drill, I let them know that they could 'ring the bell' and quit at anytime.  They weren't being punished. They were being trained. Finished practice with me praising the ones that completed CoD. The HC talked to the drop-outs.  We finished practice with only the Champions being allowed to do the team break-out. 

We had one kid that may quit the team. He is the one in the most need of an attitude adjustment.  He has some decent athletic ability.  I could probably find a spot for him at DT if he adjusts his attitude. But, he has dreams of being a RB.  We have a stable full of topnotch RB's. His chances of touching the ball as a RB are slim to none.  No one really cares if he quits.
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Offline SingleWingGoombah

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Re: QB
« Reply #42 on: August 15, 2019, 09:18:10 AM »
  No one really cares if he quits.


'Scuse me?

Offline ZACH

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Re: QB
« Reply #43 on: August 15, 2019, 09:29:52 AM »
Yesterday, for team pursuit, we ran a much more simplified version of this star burst play with MPRs and tackle dummies as the QB & front line.  The QB was there just to give the Center snaps. Behind them were 5 players in the huddle numbered 0 > 5.  We would designate who gets the ball in the huddle and burst out on the QB's cadence.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JG6xYM8fe48

Defenders had to locate the BC and neutralize him. No pads. So, No tackling. But, they had to get him wrapped up and all forward momentum stopped. Anyone lagging or jogging got to do up/downs and replaced. If the BC scored or made a large gain the entire defense did up/downs.
We rotated BC's, defenders, etc... 

We had plenty of water on hand. We got a few whiners about the heat and being thirsty, anyway.  So, I stopped the drill. Gave everyone plenty of water.  And, then I proceeded to CoD for 15 mins. Only we call it Circle of Champions. Weeded out the whiners and the mentally weak.   During the drill, I let them know that they could 'ring the bell' and quit at anytime.  They weren't being punished. They were being trained. Finished practice with me praising the ones that completed CoD. The HC talked to the drop-outs.  We finished practice with only the Champions being allowed to do the team break-out. 

We had one kid that may quit the team. He is the one in the most need of an attitude adjustment.  He has some decent athletic ability.  I could probably find a spot for him at DT if he adjusts his attitude. But, he has dreams of being a RB.  We have a stable full of topnotch RB's. His chances of touching the ball as a RB are slim to none.  No one really cares if he quits.

What age are you training navy seals?

How long can you last in your "circle of champions"? Ide be curious

You are a real piece of work, where do you coach?
"Some athletes have division 1 dreams and jv work ethic" - random

Offline tiger46

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Re: USA Tackling
« Reply #44 on: August 15, 2019, 10:01:47 AM »
Lol!  Don't worry. This kid can make it.  I know he can!! But, he comes out every season for the past few seasons. He signs up late. He does it on purpose so that he doesn't have to put in the same amount of work as the others. He even tells the other players and coaches that. He has no shame about it.  No other coach in the past has ever held his feet to the fire. Made him feel accountable for his actions.  Right now, his teammates and other coaches really don't care if he quits.  Last season, he ended up quitting.  No surprise there.  Now, everyone expects him to throw a fit, make an excuse and quit. Since he has some athletic ability, he was coddled like a 5-star D1 recruit in his previous organization. We merged with that organization. This kid was their best RB.  Our team had wiped the floor with that previous team. Our defenders made him mentally quit. It was all downhill from there for them.

Three seasons ago is the only time that I ever had a chance to work directly with this same kid.  But, it was brief. Our organization ended up folding before game 1. But, that was the only season that he didn't quit.  I didn't coddle him then.  And, I refuse to coddle him now.  His cousin was also in the drill. His cousin didn't make it through.  This player tried to talk his cousin into quitting the team together. His cousin flat out told him, "No." He wants to 'make it'.


“It is easier to build strong children than to repair broken men. ”  ― Frederick Douglass