Author Topic: USA Tackling  (Read 801 times)

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Online CoachDP

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Re: USA Tackling
« Reply #45 on: August 15, 2019, 11:09:26 AM »
He signs up late. He does it on purpose so that he doesn't have to put in the same amount of work as the others. He even tells the other players and coaches that. He has no shame about it.

This couldn’t happen on our team because of regardless how late you signed up/came out, you were going to still have to get the same amount of conditioning.  And because we’d switch to 6 hours/week from 10 hours/week after Labor Day, it’d take him two weeks of straight conditioning before he saw the field.  You couldn’t cheat our system, regardless of when you came out.  And latecomers hated having to condition by themselves while their teammates were practicing football.  Everyone put in the same amount of work.  It was harder on our coaching staff to do it this way.  Most staffs will just let the new guys slide.  That wouldn’t be fair to my kids who’d put in the hard core work to wear the jersey.

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Offline gumby_in_co

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Re: QB
« Reply #46 on: August 15, 2019, 12:38:59 PM »
Weeded out the whiners and the mentally weak.

I guess that's where I differ. I have no interest in weeding anyone out. There are many reasons that I coach, but the biggest reward for me is showing a young man or lady that they are capable of far more than they believed.

Quote
No one really cares if he quits.

I don't believe that for a second. I don't believe that YOU wouldn't care if he quit.

A couple of seasons ago, we got a kid named Vince on our Spring team. He was a notorious "team jumper" and everyone warned us about his attitude, that he was a cancer, we should just cut him, etc. I tore into another AC because he was talking about cutting his playing time . . . basically for shit he'd done on previous teams. I had Vince for 1 season in Spring, 2018. Now, he's a Sophomore competing for a spot as the Varsity center for a local football factory. He sent me a text on Saturday while I was on a camping trip:  "Coach, I need some help". For a minute, I panicked, but it turned out, his snaps were going left and he wanted some advice. Last year as a Freshman, he reached out to me and said he wanted to help us at the youth camp. His dad told Mahonz, "Vince has never been this into football or helping others. That 'Coach Gumby' seems to have had an impact on him." In the Spring, he asked me to meet him at the HS to give him some tips on beating a bull rush, which I did. Now, the idea that I am anywhere in the same discussion as the HS coaches at a perennial state champion contender is ridiculous. But, this young man reaches out to me when he needs football advice. All I did was let him know that I cared about him, I appreciated him and believed in him.

This is also the kid that many coaches and teammates wouldn't have cared if he quit over the years. So, what coach do you want to be? I've never been much of a "follow the crowd" guy.
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Online CoachDP

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Re: USA Tackling
« Reply #47 on: August 15, 2019, 02:25:37 PM »
But, he comes out every season for the past few seasons. He signs up late. He does it on purpose so that he doesn't have to put in the same amount of work as the others.

--I've already addressed this.

He even tells the other players and coaches that.

--Then the coaches are dumb/lazy for not requiring the same work of him.  They are enabling the kid's behavior and then complaining about it.  Tell me how that makes ANY sense.

Right now, his teammates and other coaches really don't care if he quits.

--I can understand when kids feel that way.  There's no excuse for a coach to feel that way.

Our team had wiped the floor with that previous team. Our defenders made him mentally quit. It was all downhill from there for them.

--Okay, hooray for you guys.

--Every year, ALL of us coaches are all granted OPPORTUNITIES like this.  Fortunately, they aren't the majority of kids we coach.  But there are just enough of them to require that we focus our attention on the opportunity of seeing them through to the finish.  Coaches complain when kids quit that they weren't tough enough to "stick it out."  I complain that coaches aren't tough enough to "stick it out" with a kid who is in desperate need of your attention.

--Dave

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Online CoachDP

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Re: QB
« Reply #48 on: August 15, 2019, 02:31:19 PM »
And, then I proceeded to CoD for 15 mins. Only we call it Circle of Champions. Weeded out the whiners and the mentally weak.

--Poor choice of words, Tiger.  Yes, the drill will reveal weakness, but it also teaches toughness.  To say it "Weeded out the whiners and the mentally weak" is too easy to interpret you as a coach who coaches in a style that should be extinct.

They weren't being punished. They were being trained.

--Very good choice of words.  I'll have to use that one.

We have a stable full of topnotch RB's. His chances of touching the ball as a RB are slim to none.  No one really cares if he quits.

--That's a really poor choice of words and an even worse approach to coaching.

--Dave

« Last Edit: August 15, 2019, 08:27:33 PM by CoachDP »
"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement:
"I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go." #BattleReady newhope

Offline tiger46

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Re: USA Tackling
« Reply #49 on: August 15, 2019, 06:18:10 PM »
I'll try to go a little more in-depth with this after today's practice. This board is great.  But, sometimes coaches here are too quick to think in the negative. I realize that some of that is my fault.  But, I don't have the time to put a back story into every post. Also, we're way off the beaten path of USA Tackling now.  I will say that it's not all about what I want as a coach out of these players. It's what they want out of football for themselves as players, too.  Take the whiney kid that no one cares about.  Obviously, he's looking for something. Or, he wouldn't keep coming back- even if it is just to quit. Why does he keep failing? I know part of the reason. He's a smart-ass. He's lazy. He talks back, etc... But, he's also smart. He has physical ability. If my goal were just to keep him on the team just to keep him on the team, I already know how to do that. Coddle him.  If his goal is to push himself farther than he ever has before, he has already achieved that. Yet, he has still failed to be a RB.  That's his goal- not mine.  I set up opportunities for him. He ruins them for himself.he HC doesn't much care for him and the RB coach can't stand him. His teammates believe that they can do just as well- if not better- without him.  He did not fail in the Enduro because he couldn't do some insane amount of push-ups I had them trying to do, or some stupid crap like that. More importantly, he was failing in team pursuit drills. He failed because of his smart-ass attitude.  I'll try to explain and clarify later.

Good luck at practice today, coaches.
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Offline mahonz

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Re: QB
« Reply #50 on: August 15, 2019, 06:35:32 PM »


A couple of seasons ago, we got a kid named Vince on our Spring team. He was a notorious "team jumper" and everyone warned us about his attitude, that he was a cancer, we should just cut him, etc. I tore into another AC because he was talking about cutting his playing time . . . basically for shit he'd done on previous teams. I had Vince for 1 season in Spring, 2018. Now, he's a Sophomore competing for a spot as the Varsity center for a local football factory. He sent me a text on Saturday while I was on a camping trip:  "Coach, I need some help". For a minute, I panicked, but it turned out, his snaps were going left and he wanted some advice. Last year as a Freshman, he reached out to me and said he wanted to help us at the youth camp. His dad told Mahonz, "Vince has never been this into football or helping others. That 'Coach Gumby' seems to have had an impact on him." In the Spring, he asked me to meet him at the HS to give him some tips on beating a bull rush, which I did. Now, the idea that I am anywhere in the same discussion as the HS coaches at a perennial state champion contender is ridiculous. But, this young man reaches out to me when he needs football advice. All I did was let him know that I cared about him, I appreciated him and believed in him.

This is also the kid that many coaches and teammates wouldn't have cared if he quit over the years. So, what coach do you want to be? I've never been much of a "follow the crowd" guy.

Folks didnt care for dad either. I tried to get both in 2016 via the Draft but they opted to stay with the Falcons.

Vince Sr and Vince Jr are two of the nicest people out there. Really misunderstood is my take and yes you had a major impact on Jr.
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Online CoachDP

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Re: USA Tackling
« Reply #51 on: August 15, 2019, 08:40:13 PM »
Take the whiney kid that no one cares about.  Obviously, he's looking for something. Or, he wouldn't keep coming back- even if it is just to quit. Why does he keep failing? I know part of the reason. He's a smart-ass. He's lazy. He talks back, etc...

--I get it.  He keeps getting in his own way.

HC doesn't much care for him and the RB coach can't stand him.

--Shouldn't matter.  He's a kid and I'll bet if his header and RB coach knew his backstory, they'd feel differently.  Regardless, we tell all of our players, it doesn't matter whether you like your teammate, you still have to be able to work with him.  The same should apply to coaches and how they deal with players. 

These are KIDS.  And coaches are in the position to help make dreams come true.


His teammates believe that they can do just as well- if not better- without him. 

--So what if he was just a kid with a great attitude and NO ability?  They'd probably feel the same.  But I'll bet the coaches might be willing to work with a kid like that.  His poor attitude is much the same as a kid with no ability.  He has to be taught.  He needs discipline.  He needs what you have to offer.  And NO ONE is in a better position to become a hero than you.  If it were easy, then anyone could do it.  But the fact is, you're the one who's in position to do something about it.  I wonder why that is.... ;)

--Dave
« Last Edit: August 15, 2019, 08:43:24 PM by CoachDP »
"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

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Offline Bob Goodman

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Re: USA Tackling
« Reply #52 on: August 16, 2019, 12:26:22 AM »
Another "accidental" bonus. We're getting a ton of conditioning the way we're running team defense. Play starts and every one is in full pursuit. First whistle blows and my 5 second countdown starts. Any stragglers are sprinting to get in their "love tap". Then, I call "reload" and another coach, who's pet peeve is not reloading fast enough starts his 5 second countdown. If they aren't back in position in 5 seconds, they do 5 up/downs. So we have kids sprinting to the ball, then sprinting back to position while getting lots of meaningful reps.
I learned, practically by accident, years ago that countdowns are like magic with kids.  I never specified any penalty, they just did whatever it was.

Offline gumby_in_co

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Re: USA Tackling
« Reply #53 on: August 16, 2019, 12:34:47 AM »
I learned, practically by accident, years ago that countdowns are like magic with kids.  I never specified any penalty, they just did whatever it was.

It's like magic, isn't it? I was trying to take a backseat tonight and let the position coaches do their thing, so I had a "big picture" view of the defense. At one point, I'm asking myself, "Am I actually seeing a 3rd grade team with a sense of urgency?"
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Offline tiger46

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Re: USA Tackling
« Reply #54 on: August 16, 2019, 08:17:30 AM »
We were in team pursuit drills. I was plugging kids in and out of different positions and evaluating.  I had more than enough good players to fill every defensive position and have great pursuit drills.  Whoopie! So, what? That wasn't the point to have some make the team, or me, look good.  I can’t guarantee a win on opening day. But, I do know that we have enough good players to give an opposing team hell if we train them correctly.  The point was to get every player on the team to have meaningful playing time when they're in the game. I want them to give their all during this drill.  I don’t care if they’re fast, slow, tall, skinny, ADHD, whatever.  It takes no talent to hustle. It takes willpower and determination.  I can't wait until gameday to see if that happens.  This isn't just about MPRs or just about the talented.  It is about the mindsets and goals of the players.  Some of the ones that failed the Enduro Drill, etc... are starters.  Some are MPR’s. Some are ‘tweeners. But, why did they fail? How did they fail?

 The starting SS is one of the best kids on the team physically. He's tough as nails. He's very fast and he can hit hard enough to knock rainwater out of a concrete wall. He has a big patch of skin missing on his shoulder where he skinned it from trying to jump a ramp on a scooter.  His favorite drill is Whose Ball.  I can't keep him out of it.  At Tuesday's practice, with sweat stinging the hell out of his wound, I still can't keep him out of Whose Ball. He can't get enough of it! I already know that he's physically tough. He can make it through any physically taxing Enduro Drill. There's nothing within reason that I can throw at him that he can't physically endure. But, he failed at a drill that he has already made it through before.  So, what's his problem? He has anger issues. It gets him into trouble at home, at school and everywhere else. It gets him unsportsmanlike penalties on a football field. Or, he had to be pulled off of the field before he hurt the team by doing something out of control. I am already aware of all of this.  We’ve not directly coached this kid until this season.  But, We’ve observed him practice and play for two prior seasons. All every coach, etc.. said about him was, “He’s a beast! He’s a beast!”  Yep. True that.  But, now your beast is sitting on the sideline because he couldn’t control his anger.  And, no one was ever trying to truly help him.  It was always just the same old ‘throw their arms around his shoulders, tough love speeches’. 

At practice, He was angry because he was replaced at SS in team pursuit because of mental mistakes.  The back-up SS is new to the team.  He’s only a little less physically gifted than the starter and comes without all of the emotional baggage.  He’s doing a great job at SS and the starter sees this.  SS’s anger led him into even more mistakes as a RB in the same drill. He tried to freelance and go where he wasn't supposed to go to prove how good he is. Not only did he get immediately swarmed and swallowed up, in his anger he forgot to protect the football.  ROLB(who had just replaced the kid nobody likes) stripped it and ran it back.  Now, this kid is even angrier. He's pointing fingers, blaming others, sulking, etc... (the back-up SS is the one that made the initial hit and wrapped him up). It’s just a matter of a countdown to T-Minus 0 and imminent emotional blow-up. 

Mr. Unlikeable is letting everyone know that he didn’t care about being replaced at LB because he didn’t want to play defense, anyway. Some of his teammates are on his ass about it. The RB coach is hearing him and the RB coach is getting pissed off.  LDE was whining about water and the heat. This is August. This is Texas. And, we have an over-abundance of cold water on hand that we’ve been more than generous about giving out.  Yet, he’s whining.  There are a few others starting to pick up his vibe. None of this is happening in a vacuum.  These things and other issues are just beneath the surface. Bubbling up through the cracks. These are not one-offs. It’s all happening simultaneously.  To an outside observer, I bet we actually looked pretty good in team pursuit. But, I knew better. I’m watching this very talented team on the road to the same outcome as last season.  They went 2-6.   So, I calmly stepped into this mess.  I stopped the drill. I, and the RB coach, give them water until none of them wanted anymore.  The RB coach wants to make them run. He wants to punish them. I don’t want to punish them. I want to train them.  I matter-of-factly start them on the Enduro Drill. No chastisement. No derision. No fingers pointed.
« Last Edit: August 16, 2019, 12:03:55 PM by tiger46 »
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Re: USA Tackling
« Reply #55 on: August 16, 2019, 10:23:38 AM »
When I've had hot-heads, I've always asked other players to give Mr. Hot-Head a late shove or hit, after a play.  Or, to go up to him after a play and say something to make him mad.  I also tell Mr. Hot-Head that I'm telling the players to do this intentionally and you either respond to it and get tossed out of the game, or you can get used to it at practice and ignore it.  Once these Hot-Heads realize I'm setting them up, they put the extracurricular stuff on ignore.

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Offline tiger46

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Re: USA Tackling
« Reply #56 on: August 16, 2019, 02:45:44 PM »
Sorry for the long posts.  But, I’m trying to work through all of this back story stuff. It still won’t be all of it But, maybe it clarifies some things.
On to the Enduro Drill. The drill that I put them through had physical elements to it. It caused some of the MPRs and ‘tweeners to stop I did not use the word ‘quit’. They gave all that they had and their tanks were empty. I simply tapped them out of the drill. I’ll make no excuses for them.  But, IMO, they were not lazy. They weren’t the ones whining. They were not mentally weak. They had reached the end of their physical abilities. In fact, one of the little chubby MPR’s came so close to making it to the end that almost didn’t have the heart to tap him out.  It would have made a nice feel good story. It may have even benefited the team overall in some way. But, that would have served him no purpose. He is also a kid with anger issues. I’ve already had to have an ‘attitude adjustment’ session with him because of the way that he treated his mother at home.  He hasn’t been causing any more problems since.
So, on to ‘separating the whiners and the mentally weak’.  The phrasing seems to have stuck in some coaches craws. Doesn’t matter. It is what I did. When it comes right down to it; it is what we all do. It’s like discussing Sex Ed., and being too afraid to use the phrase ‘inserting the penis into the vagina’. Try to get past it. It’s not the focal point.  It doesn’t have to be done with malice. It’s not even necessarily a bad thing when we do it. It does not have to be benevolent, either.  We’re not obligated to go over and throw our arms around them and give them a heart to heart talk. But, it has to be done.

I think the good or bad comes from our actions as coaches after we have done it. That’s when we’re answering the question, “What type of coach do you want to be?” We have many motivations behind it: It shows the players that they can accomplish tremendous things together as a team while Negative Nate and Johnny Cancer are quarantined in the shade sipping ice cold water. It gives a coach time to inoculate the team against any future problems from those types of players when/if they re-join the team.  You don’t have to point those kids out and say anything negative. You can just make it known that when others are telling them it’s too hot, you can’t do it, this sux they already know that they can do it.  They don’t have to listen to the naysayers. It’s their choice to make. It gives a coach time to go talk to those players about what he thinks they did wrong and what it is that they need to do to become better football players and teammates before they re-join the team. 

Mr. Unlikeable failed when I gave the simple command, “Down!” Everyone knows to get down in push-up position.  He decided to flop on his butt and smirk. As soon as I looked at him he said, “You said to ‘sit down. I’m sitting down.” I said, “I didn’t say ‘Sit down’. I said, ‘Down!’” 
He came back with, “Well, how was I supposed to know? You didn’t-“ at which point I interrupted him by tapping him on the shoulder and telling him, “Get out of the drill. You’re done. Water is over there.” He wanted to show everybody how clever he was.  That he could defy the rules and vex the coach because he is smarter than everybody- even if it was at their expense. Everyone else was in the proper push-up position. Had I indulged him, they’d have had to suffer through it while in that position.  But, I chose not to engage or entertain him.  I simply booted him from the drill and continued on with the team.
SS failed because he got so angry, mouthy and bitchy that it was no longer worth the team listening to him.  I tapped his shoulder and booted him from the drill.  Mr. Unlikeable’s cousin got booted when they were given the simple instruction of taking one- and, only one- healthy gulp of water and pass the bottle to your teammate.  He drank and kept drinking until he emptied the bottle and passed the empty bottle to his teammate while burping and wiping his mouth with the back of his hand.  Anyone ever seen that movie ‘The Three Amigos’ with that water drinking scene with Chevy Chase? It was that funny. But, I kept myself from laughing. I booted him from the drill. His selfishness was expected.  I saw that when he was plugged in at OLB during pursuit drills and he really didn’t try to chase down any play away from him. I had stopped using the ‘2 second’ drill to force everyone to do their jobs.  I don’t want to have to force them. I want them to learn it and then do it on their own.   Also, the ones that drank water and poured the water on their heads before passing it were booted. The players that purposely let the water splash all down their shirt front; sneaky, clever… booted.  I had expected those types of things. That’s why I only gave them just enough water to get a healthy gulp and pass it down.  It would have been just enough water for everyone had those players followed instructions and had not decided to be knuckleheads, instead.  There was nothing physically taxing about it. Complaining about another player, whether he deserved it, or not… booted.  Those were the types of mentally weak things that I was getting rid of as quickly as possible.
I could have forced the pursuit drill to look good again by re- implementing the ‘2 second’ rule.  I could have let the SS bitch and moan all the way to the end of the Enduro Drill. I didn’t have to put mental tests in the drill.  I could have engaged Mr. Unlikeable and proved to him and everybody that I am, both, cleverer and wield more power than him.  I could have just handed the next player another water bottle and left the Guzzler in the drill. But, I didn’t because it wouldn’t have benefited them. 

The reason that I think a lot of them made ‘mentally weak’ decisions is because they thought they were being punished when they were really being trained to deal with adversity.  I know that to be true because a couple said exactly that when I talked to them the next day at practice.  I gathered them up in a group.  But, I asked them individually, why did they fail Enduro? Why did they not want to give their all during team pursuit?  I didn’t try to put words in their mouths.  I let them tell me what they thought. And, then I made suggestions on how to correct themselves and do better.

There were way better and more positive things that came out of the entire thing like three MPR’s that made it through the entire drill.  The last exercise was everyone bear-crawling as fast as they could to me in the middle of the circle, touching me and bear-crawling back to their place in the circle. They didn’t know that they had to stay in push-up position until everyone finished. I didn’t forewarn them. The MPR’s were struggling to make it back. Instead of moaning about being in push-up position or heaping derision on the less physically gifted that the better players had earlier, they actually yelled encouragement to the MPR’s. And, they held up until the MPR’s made it!
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Offline gumby_in_co

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Re: USA Tackling
« Reply #57 on: August 16, 2019, 03:41:34 PM »
That paints a much different picture than your earlier post. My impression was that you punished them with CoD for whining about heat and water, even though you told them they weren't being punished. Another impression I got was that the CoD weeded out the whiners and mentally weak, and that you took some level of joy in that. That's why I chimed in.

Also, "no one cares if he quits", is hard to misinterpret. Mahonz told our team last night that in decades of coaching, we have never given up on a player. That's not true, at least not for me. I gave up on a kid a couple of seasons ago who gave us the "right look" when he knew we were looking, then bragged to his teammates how he got over on us. I gave up on him when he ditched the final practice before a playoff game to go trick or treating . . . then bragged to his teammates about all the candy he got and how they were all suckers for going to practice. The main reason I gave up on him is that his teammates were pissed. Not because they missed out on Halloween. Not because they would rather had been elsewhere than practice, but because they realized that this kid was not committed to their goals. That was not acceptable to them. That's the moment that I realized that after 50 something practices, he did not belong. He was an 8th grader at the time and was not allowed to play for our Spring team, where WE decided who is on the team. I would not have been bothered if he had quit.

So I get what you're saying, but my opinion (which shouldn't matter one bit to you) is that you may have given up on this kid a tad early, but you were there an I wasn't.
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Offline tiger46

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Re: USA Tackling
« Reply #58 on: August 16, 2019, 05:14:04 PM »
That paints a much different picture than your earlier post. My impression was that you punished them with CoD for whining about heat and water, even though you told them they weren't being punished. Another impression I got was that the CoD weeded out the whiners and mentally weak, and that you took some level of joy in that. That's why I chimed in.

Also, "no one cares if he quits", is hard to misinterpret. Mahonz told our team last night that in decades of coaching, we have never given up on a player. That's not true, at least not for me. I gave up on a kid a couple of seasons ago who gave us the "right look" when he knew we were looking, then bragged to his teammates how he got over on us. I gave up on him when he ditched the final practice before a playoff game to go trick or treating . . . then bragged to his teammates about all the candy he got and how they were all suckers for going to practice. The main reason I gave up on him is that his teammates were pissed. Not because they missed out on Halloween. Not because they would rather had been elsewhere than practice, but because they realized that this kid was not committed to their goals. That was not acceptable to them. That's the moment that I realized that after 50 something practices, he did not belong. He was an 8th grader at the time and was not allowed to play for our Spring team, where WE decided who is on the team. I would not have been bothered if he had quit.

So I get what you're saying, but my opinion (which shouldn't matter one bit to you) is that you may have given up on this kid a tad early, but you were there an I wasn't.

I'm the only coach that deals with his attitude. My standing request with the other coaches is that whenever he's too much for them to deal with it, send him to me.  I don't know if I can help him. But, I know he's destined to failure if he stays there aggravating those other coaches. But, I really don't want to make my posts about me.  I want that kid to achieve what he wants- not what I want for him.  But, he has to realize that I can't give him what he wants and neither can anyone else.  He wants to be a RB. He wants to be a star again. He wants to be the team darling.  Instead, he's swiftly becoming the team's pariah because he refuses to acknowledge the reality that he has to work his ass off to achieve his own goals.   I really didn't know if he'd be back. But, he returned to practice Thursday. There is good and bad in that. It's not all sunshine and rainbows.

The bad: Of all the kids that didn't make it through the Enduro Drill, he was the only one that still insisted on making an excuse for his behavior.  He still refused to take responsibility.  In his eyes, it was still all my fault for not being more specific enough about what 'Down!' meant. It was other players fault for not telling him.  I asked him why didn't he just assume the same position everyone else was in?  He said he wasn't looking at them. Yeah, right.  We were in a circle.  Those excuses were so lame, I just shrugged and moved on.  Again, I refused to entertain his BS. 

After practice a bunch of players were throwing footballs around.  I usually stop that kind of stuff. That's how footballs go missing.  But, I noticed how no one was throwing any footballs to him.  That means his teammates still don't like him. 

The good: He worked with the HC and the RB coach the entire practice. He did not have to be sent over to me. His chances of being a RB are still slim to none. He has a long, hard row to hoe. But, at least his feet are on the right path, for now. He made that decision for himself. I didn't make it for him. I couldn't have made it for him.  But, again, I am not making a case study out of this kid. He is not my life's work as a coach.  If the only challenge that he can raise himself up to meet is doing whatever I tell him to do, he's going to end up being a DT, where I want him to be. His dreams and aspirations are his own obligations to fulfill.  He either gets that or, he doesn't.  I really don't even like focusing on him in these posts.  There are a lot of better- and, worse- things that went on besides dealing with some player with a surly, smart-ass attitude who may, or may not, change his attitude.

I liked that every other player besides Mr. Unlikeable took responsibility for why they failed.  "I'm not in shape. I've been sitting at home playing video games. I thought I was being punished. I was just mad because you took me off SS." etc...  The MPR's that finished the drill. One is so quiet that I didn't know his name. I just nick-named him 'Whisper.' I tried everything to get him to speak louder. I've had other players sound off loudly with their names. I tried shaking his hand, had other coaches shake his hand, tried letting him observe us shaking hands and speaking aloud.  Nothing.  The kid just whispers.  I didn't think he had an aggressive bone in his body.  Kids knock him every which way and he does nothing. He politely loses at Whose Ball. He politely does his required up/downs and politely gets back in line. He politely gets shoved out of the way by other players when I put him in the pit. They take his blocking shield or take the football from him and watch him politely exit.  But, something in him refused to quit during the Enduro Drill. He made it all the way through.  That drill was on Wednesday. During Thursday's practice, he actually hit the tackle dummy with some effort and drove his feet during blocking drills. He's a medium sized kid.  He could be used somewhere. But, I don't know where.  After the drill he came up to me and asked, "Coach. Can I play WR?"  He was standing right in front of me and I swear I didn't even know it was him that had spoken. I've never heard his full voice.  A teammate screamed, "Whisper talked!"  That's how shocking it was. Every kid there started hooting and clapping for him and clapping him on the back. After practice I had him run some routes and catch some balls.  He wouldn't be our fastest WR- or, our best. But,  he has just enough speed to get the job done and he has some pretty decent hands.  He caught a lot more than he dropped.  The HC is going to try him out at WR drills on Tuesday.  Well, I'll be damned.... LOL!
“It is easier to build strong children than to repair broken men. ”  ― Frederick Douglass

Offline CoachBigD

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Re: USA Tackling
« Reply #59 on: August 19, 2019, 01:20:44 PM »
Not a fan of the "chest plate" tackling they used to teach.  We have no weight limit for runners, and a big back will demolish a smaller kid who comes in a tackles high.
« Last Edit: August 19, 2019, 01:23:17 PM by CoachBigD »