Author Topic: Thoughts on the YDW and Offense in General  (Read 492 times)

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Offline coachgregory

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Thoughts on the YDW and Offense in General
« on: September 06, 2019, 04:37:14 PM »
I am not coaching football this season.  We have a rule in the house 1 season 1 sport.  My son has been playing travel ball for a while now and his coaches want him to play fall ball and winter he is now wrestling.  He had to make a decision to play football or baseball and opted for Baseball... Which to be honest with you he is a hell of a baseball player.  Is the starting catcher and rotates into short stop with the other kid that plays catcher.  He  also is a pitcher with a really nice 58/60mph 4seam and a really wicked 2seam/cutter.  His change up is a work in progress :)  He likes to throw the fast stuff so has to work on the change ups.  He wrestles in the winter and goes to a wrestling and jujitsu academy .  Actually he wrestles a few weight classes up and is really good at it. 

  My oldest is now playing premier soccer...we travel a lot for his club (and I hate soccer but I am learning to appreciate it...like going to the dentist :) )He has become the enforcer on his team...he just turned 13 and is 6'0 in size 12 shoes and he started lifting over the summer...dead lift, bench, squat, clean, and lots of pull ups and push up.  So there is not to many kids on the soccer field that openly challenge him or contest him with the ball. He also swims competitively so we have busy weeks now.  Between travel baseball and travel soccer coupled with wrestling and swimming are days/weeks/months are busy. I enjoy all of it none the less and love watching them have fun.  We occasionally get to take the bass boat out and do some serious bass and crappie fishing when time permits :)

Anyways that means I am not coaching this season.  I did do a few clinics in the summer for a few orgs and that was really fun one for the 63 defense and one for the YDW. I thought I put some of my random thoughts down on offense here and I will start one in the 63 thread. I had a chance to talk to Willy Moore a few days ago and it got me thinking of all the things I have learned through experience and time.  Figured I would put some of it down for others to read...and laugh at :)

1) Be open minded when coaching.  We should be always in learning mode and we can learn new things from a variety of places. I have probably learned more about coaching in the past few years from my kids more than anywhere else.  I have noticed as I have gotten older I have gotten grumpier...  I often have to remind myself that patience is a virtue...(this is hard to remember at moments). 

The last year I coached my oldest son in football we decided to break the team up because we had a lot of "maybe" parents.  Maybe we will be at practice...we had a lot of talented boys but having five or six kids playing multiple sports during football season and not showing up to practice or showing up late got old quickly.   So after talking to my son he and the core group decide to play flag/7x7 tourneys instead the next season.   For five seasons he played Oline and DLine with no interested in the backfield so when we moved to flag we had eight boys (all friends that hang out together) and no real QB to speak of so I did an open competition.   I knew there was two boys on the team that could compete for it and then we picked up a new kid who wanted to try out as well.  My son, in my shock, asked if he could as well.  That started a two month process of him asking me every other day or so if I would take him outside and work out.  Come to find out he was a pretty decent QB and had a good head for the game.  He ended up winning out and taking the QB spot for the entire season.  We ended up finishing second or third in the flag league against some pretty good flag teams in the Gold League and won a few tournaments in the process.  That was his last season playing football as he wanted to try out for a travel soccer team and that was all she wrote :)  He was asked to try out for his middle school football team but he declined so it is all soccer and swim for him.  I learned a lot from that little stinker out in our back yard.  As we would walk through QB drills he would ask tons of questions and we would try out different things.  Turns out he was really listening to all of our coaches when he was a little kid and hung out on the football field with my Prince of Peace team.  He was a really good center but he never had shown any interest in being a back much less QB... I was able to learn how he was processing info...from all the questions he was asking and being able to stop the practice or drill and walk through things... First off the mind of a child is a scary scary thing...but it was insightful.

2) Know what you are good at and build off it!  Everyone has a coaching style and an offense/defense/and special teams style...  Don't stray away from what makes you comfortable and happy.. Instead learn how to build off it and into something that is your own as you gain experience.  If you are new to football coaching...pick a system that makes you excited and learn that specific system. Get good at it before you "make it your own".   If power running is your thing...embrace it...if throwing the ball to everyone is your thing embrace it.  Adapt as you go and improve on what you know.

3) Relax and have fun on the field.  Probably the biggest thing as adults we have to remember is to make some aspect of the practice exciting and fun for the kids.  Make it competitive and get the parents involved.  Make it fun...kids buy in...parents buy in...   

More to follow on other things...more football related...I got to rambling.

Jack
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Offline Wing-n-It

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Re: Thoughts on the YDW and Offense in General
« Reply #1 on: September 06, 2019, 04:56:41 PM »
Have you talked with Mike B? He is trying to prepare for a superbowl run and when he gets to the SB this team just has that extra stuff and he hits a roadblock.

If you haven't I'll IM you with the issues he is having maybe you can get him over the hump.

Whats this I hear about oldest playing soccer,.......?  Blasphemy

It sounds all is good with you Jack, I'm glad to see you're posting more and more. Your insight is awesome

 

Robert

2 Things my offense will always have is a Wing and a Wedge

Offline CoachDP

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Re: Thoughts on the YDW and Offense in General
« Reply #2 on: September 06, 2019, 05:05:08 PM »
My son has been playing travel ball for a while now and his coaches want him to play fall ball and winter he is now wrestling.

--Wrestling, huh?  Get him a decent tag team partner and a cool mask like Rey Mysterio and he's all set.  I ask our football players that wrestle what their finishing maneuver is.  They look at me like I'm crazy.

LOL...  That would be fun to watch... 

Quote
My oldest is now playing premier soccer...we travel a lot for his club (and I hate soccer but I am learning to appreciate it...like going to the dentist :)

--You are a better man than I.  The sacrifices you make for your son... ;)

I thought I put some of my random thoughts down on offense here and I will start one in the 63 thread.

--Puhleeze do!


I think I have actually figured out how offsides works in soccer.  It is like quantum physics but harder...

Ok...will do.

Quote

I had a chance to talk to Willy Moore a few days ago and it got me thinking of all the things I have learned through experience and time.

--He is a great guy.  He and I drove to New Orleans together several years ago for the DWS.


Yes he is.  He is a great person and a great coach.  It is always about the kids and getting better as a teacher of the game of football.

Quote
I have noticed as I have gotten older I have gotten grumpier...  I often have to remind myself that patience is a virtue...(this is hard to remember at moments). 

--That's interesting.  For me, it's been the opposite.  I am far more laid back out there now than I used to be.  Perhaps you're just getting to the "Get out of my yard!" stage.


I think it is because I really don't suffer fools and that has grown into being crotchety.  On the field I have fun... 

Quote

2) Know what you are good at and build off it!  Everyone has a coaching style and an offense/defense/and special teams style...  Don't stray away from what makes you comfortable and happy..

--Tell that to Mahonz.  He has the worst case of "Roving Eye" that I've ever seen.


I think that is what really makes Mike happy.  He likes the chaos of new and diving into the deep end with blinders on... LOL

Quote

3) Relax and have fun on the field.  Probably the biggest thing as adults we have to remember is to make some aspect of the practice exciting and fun for the kids.  Make it competitive and get the parents involved.  Make it fun...kids buy in...parents buy in...   

More to follow on other things...more football related...I got to rambling.

--Man, I hope this gets to be a regular feature, Jack.  I really do.

--Dave


I will try... I need to post more often.  Willie made a point to say that all of us old horses need to post more often for the new guys coming into the coaching arena. 

Jack
« Last Edit: September 06, 2019, 09:06:28 PM by coachgregory »
"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement:
"I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go." #BattleReady newhope

Offline CoachDP

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Re: Thoughts on the YDW and Offense in General
« Reply #3 on: September 06, 2019, 05:06:26 PM »
It sounds all is good with you Jack, I'm glad to see you're posting more and more. Your insight is awesome

Exactly.  Makes me want to sit down, shut up and listen.

--Dave
"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement:
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Offline coachgregory

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Re: Thoughts on the YDW and Offense in General
« Reply #4 on: September 06, 2019, 08:43:28 PM »
Have you talked with Mike B? He is trying to prepare for a superbowl run and when he gets to the SB this team just has that extra stuff and he hits a roadblock.

If you haven't I'll IM you with the issues he is having maybe you can get him over the hump.

Whats this I hear about oldest playing soccer,.......?  Blasphemy

It sounds all is good with you Jack, I'm glad to see you're posting more and more. Your insight is awesome

I did a few times but we need to sync up so he and I can really talk about what he needs.

Jack
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Offline Wing-n-It

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Re: Thoughts on the YDW and Offense in General
« Reply #5 on: September 06, 2019, 09:22:17 PM »
I did a few times but we need to sync up so he and I can really talk about what he needs.

Jack
Awesome, I was asked to do defense last and this year but my work schedule is stupid crazy now so I couldn't.

Thanks for all you have done Jack

Robert
Robert

2 Things my offense will always have is a Wing and a Wedge

Offline coachgregory

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Re: Thoughts on the YDW and Offense in General
« Reply #6 on: September 08, 2019, 09:44:20 PM »
Awesome, I was asked to do defense last and this year but my work schedule is stupid crazy now so I couldn't.

Thanks for all you have done Jack

Robert

Mike mentioned that and that he was really bummed you couldn't do it.  If Mike needs me I will assist him in any way I can.

Jack
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Offline mahonz

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Re: Thoughts on the YDW and Offense in General
« Reply #7 on: September 08, 2019, 10:05:24 PM »
Great to hear from you Jack !

Good to hear things are...happy.  :)
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Offline coachgregory

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Re: Thoughts on the YDW and Offense in General
« Reply #8 on: September 08, 2019, 11:28:57 PM »
YDW - Starting thoughts on the offense.

Ok, so I think I will get this started and if there is any feedback or questions fire away.

1) Starting with 6 to 8 year olds

I figure I will clear the table on this age right now so we can move to nine and up.  Why 6 to 8...well this is really based on maturity, team sports experience, and development of basic motor skills and the ability to absorb an offensive playbook and develop a comfort level with it.

KEEP IT SIMPLE....seriously KEEP IT SIMPLE!!! 

At this age you are not going to win with complex schemes you are going to win with blocking, tackling, ball handling, and teaching aggression.  Make your offense simple and find a series or two of plays that hit every point on the line of scrimmage.  Have a pass play or two to beat a defense stacked up on the line. 

Yes you can throw...just keep it simple...one or two in the route at most and keep your pass pro simple... Use play action or some kind of shadow action (will go into this later).

Start with Wedge blocking first especially for 6 and 7-year-olds.  You can dominate teams as the defensive linemen tend to not get into good stances and they tend to stand up or not fire off.  This works well with wedge blocking and it promises you positive yards. 

Benefits - No specific order

1) It gives you one blocking scheme to master at first.  That means you can work on all the aspects of the blocking scheme to get it rocking and rolling.
2) You can put adjustments on the edge to hit the outside with blocking. 
3) You can build a very simple pass off the wedge called wall blocking. 
4) It allows you have to have an inside power running game and set up split and full flow action outside using your wingbacks and quarterback.
5)  It allows you to set up a belly action off the wedge running and split/flow action behind it. 
6) It is great for simple play-action passing.

What you get.

Buck Wedge - Split flow action behind FB Wedge.  That is a power running game with boot action and sweep action going in opposite directions.  At young ages, this can really rock a defense as linebackers and secondary tend to chase what they see in front of them.

Buck Wedge Rt/Lt (Buck Wedge Rt/Lt Super - tells the TE's to block wedge)
Buck Wedge Sweep Rt/Lt
Buck Wedge Sweep Rt/Lt QB Boot
Buck Wedge Rt/Lt Pop Pass Rt/Lt

Fenton Wedge - Full flow with motion/shift WB wedge.  This allows you to teach the motion action and toss action without pullers.  Teaches the WB to get vertical off the toss.  It is a simple series that my brilliant friend and genius football coach developed in Fenton Michigan.  It is a simple series that helped him win a multitude of championships.  It helped me on several occasions get a young team spun up on our offensive fundamentals. To start if the motion is an issue you can simply SHIFT the WB into his pitch/toss spot until you develop it.  The beauty of this series is it keeps the TE's in for wedge as a base and it gets the WB's involved in the wedge running.  You can start with a handoff to WB after a shift, move to a toss/pitch to WB after shift, then go to motion and toss to WB.  This allows you to develop skills as you go for the power series.

Fenton Wedge Rt/Lt (Rt/Lt wb gets the ball off the QB toss or handoff if you like)
Fenton Wedge Rt/Lt Flood Pass Lt/Rt
Fenton Wedge Rt/Lt QB Belly Lt/Rt
Fenton Wedge Rt/Lt BB Sweep Lt/Rt
Fenton Wedge Rt/Lt Spike Pass Rt/Lt (TE works inside for two steps and goes vertical through next DL inside shoulder.)

Belly Wedge Sweep - full flow action behind FB wedge with the QB running belly and WB running sweep away from the FB wedge.  It is a great series to add when the sweep side OLB is flowing hard to defender sweep and the DL is collapsing hard inside to defend to wedge.  The QB belly allows you to take advantage of the gap that opens in the B gap as the A gap (Wedge) and D gap (Sweep) are being overplayed.

Belly Wedge Rt/Lt  (super call to tell the TE's to stay in and block)
Belly Wedge Rt/Lt QB Belly Lt/Rt
Belly Wedge Rt/Lt WB Sweep Lt/Rt
Belly Wedge Rt/Lt Corner/Drag Pass Lt/Rt (PS WB runs a corner off of the log block action and BSTE runs a drag through the first OLB's heels and flattens out.  The QB reads HIGH (PSWB corner) to LOW (BSTE drag).)  Later you can add the PSTE running arc and flat and flip turn it into a half roll reading low to mid to drag (more advanced).

This gives you a very complete offense using WEDGE run blocking and WALL pass protection.

The first thing you need to do is teach wedge blocking to the line (TE to TE).
Focus heavily on Center getting snaps.  If you are DTDW get snaps under center and if DSDW get shotgun snaps in at the front and backside of every practice you can.  Work for 15/15/15 (15 static snaps, 15 first step snaps, 15 three-step on a shield snaps.).  If possible work one on one with your center so that he gains confidence in his snap and block. 

Pet Peeve of Mine...

If you are going to be a Doublewing team you need to understand that everyone on your offense is a blocker.  EVERYONE.   There is no place for primadonna QB's or RB's.  I am not a fan of booting or hockey sticking my QB as a base in the Doublewing.  So you have to spend team time on blocking with everyone involved.  One-on-one LEG blocking, oline wedge blocking, and backfield kickout/lead/log blocking.   Get them used to being physical and punishing the other team.

After we do dynamic warmups we work on blocking, tackling, and shedding blocks as an entire team. It is actually part of our warmups and on the first day of practice we start teaching our dynamic warmps and we split up in one on one blocking, tackling, and defensive shedding.  This something we consider to be cumulative...we might only get 3 to 5 reps of each but we do it every practice and every pre-game warmup.

We then work on blocking...working on dummies and our LEG progression typically 2 to 4 at a time.  Blocking for 5 yards...working on dummies first, then working on a static defender, a defender moving forward.  If you have a cage or make a cage or use a PVC pipe to keep the blocker low do it. 

1) Blocker against a static dummy -  2 to 3 reps
2) Blocker against a dummy moving to the blocker - 2 to 3 reps
3) Blocker against a static defender - 2 to 3 reps
4) Blocker against a defender moving towards the blocker - 2 to 3 reps

Start with the 1) and 2) first.  As they get good go to 2) and 3).  As they develop go to 3) and 4).  As the season progresses you go to 4) all the time.

As soon as that is done we go into tackling using the same method but that is for the 63 thread :)

After that, if we are in an offense day we split into OLINE and BACKS.  The line works on wedge blocking and eventually wall blocking.  Add edge adjustments as needed. The oline uses a wedge blocking progression.

The backs are working on the action (Buck/Belly/Fenton). First on-air to teach the technique, then on a static defender or a coach with a shield/bag, then a static defender, and finally a live defender moving. 

Then take the two teams and combine them and work on building timing and perfection.  First on-air, then on static defender.  The beauty of this is you only a NT or two DT's and the edge defenders (DE/OLB/CB).


Jack
« Last Edit: September 08, 2019, 11:31:35 PM by coachgregory »
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Offline coachgregory

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Re: Thoughts on the YDW and Offense in General
« Reply #9 on: September 09, 2019, 08:36:00 AM »
Heads up on the attachments.  They are two different set of notes and I am in the process of redoing them.
The additions are just notes from things I coach differently and twists in what I do as we progress.

Jack



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Offline coachgregory

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Re: Thoughts on the YDW and Offense in General
« Reply #10 on: September 09, 2019, 10:05:30 AM »
A Bit more on 6, 7, and 8 year olds and the Wedge Series.

What I gave you above is three complete wedge series each with unique features.  If I install an offense with a 6 year old team and this is their first experience with football and team sports in general, and there is a very good chance that is the case, then I am going to install a wedge series first.

The first offensive series I am going to install is BUCK WEDGE.  It gives me the ability to get 3 backs involved in the offense very quickly.  That would be the FB in the wedge, the QB in the boot & boot pass, and the WB in the buck sweep. 

I would get really good at this one series and those three plays first.  I would get any adjustments installed and make sure the offense was comfortable and capable of executing these three (really four -QB boot and QB boot pass are just a tad different) plays.

The Difference between Wedge and Wall blocking - ok so we really have two blocking schemes!

Wall blocking is really simple so don't try to complicate it.  First it looks like wedge blocking for the first three steps after that it looks like a wall.  All you do is teach the center to block for three steps vertically and then hold ground.  Everyone else involved in the wall slides in just like wedge and meshes with their inside half of their body pressed/sealed up to the next man inside.  Their outside half arm is free and used to hold off any defender inside/over them.  Once the center gets three steps and the wall forms (it will move about 1 to 2 yards up the field and that  is perfectly ok - you get a 3 yard cushion).  They then hold ground for as long as they can till the pass if off. 

We use this for Boot and Pop/Spike passes.  The reason we use it for boot is to sell the wedge action and suck in the DL and LB the split flow action will take care of backside defender and the QB is responsible for gaining depth and getting outside the boot side defender.  He has to be taught to get his eyes on the Boot side TE and get depth and accelerate deep and away from the center of the formation.  With Pop and Spike it is really simple fake buck (wedge/sweep) and then reset feet and throw the ball just over the head of the LB's (not a rainbow/don't hang the ball).  The wall if executed properly will form and hold the defense in place for the 1.5 to 2 seconds you need to get the ball off.

When you start to pass you need to get a lot of reps in for the QB to pull off the fake, boot, and throw off the boot pass. 

1) Get the fake down so that the QB is really comfortable with that action to a point it is second nature. It takes lots of reps on air and then with a FB and WB.  His boot has to gain depth and then sprint under the DE at the same time his eyes are up field on the Boot side TE. 

2) I like to do this on air a few times (2 to 6) for the QB so he doesn't have to worry about ball placement. Take to 5 gallon bucks and put one at the FB handoff point and one at the WB handoff point.  He must pull off the fake and then boot out to depth (we put a cone to the landing location that he stops gaining depth and boots away).  Then we remove the buckets and add the backs and walk it, jog it, and run it. (2 to 6 reps each).    If the run is ragged (it will be at first) start over at walk it, jog it, run it.  Keep doing that until the run looks like it will work (trust me you will know).  Remove the walk and go to jog it, run it and then move to static defender, moving defender.  Don't run this live until the backfield gets the action down to the point they can run it against a live defenders in BACK time.  If you run it to early you will destroy their confidence and it isn't worth it.

Also when you implement the pop and spike you need lots of reps.  The pass is not deep it is just at or past the LB's. Something to bear in mind...the pop/spike will not work if the LB's are simply sitting on their position. These passes are predicated on the LB's jumping the run action in some manner and moving down hill so that the receiver replaces them and gets a quick easy pass over the top.  IT NEEDS REPS.

Jack
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Offline coachgregory

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Re: Thoughts on the YDW and Offense in General
« Reply #11 on: September 12, 2019, 02:34:35 PM »
Inserting the Power Series for 6 to 8 year olds.

Some coaches are of the mind set to put the power series in right away with this age group.  I am not opposed to it but it depends on if the team an handle all the moving parts involved with running the actual double wing.  More often than not the answer is no (at first).  Kids at this age are going to struggle with all the moving parts in the double wing and more often than not the team is heavily dependent on the wedge.  Which is why I suggest running a wedge series at first as you get the power series implemented.  If you notice above the team is actually working on one on one blocking every practice in warm ups and in fundamental sessions.  The next step is where we start getting the power series installed into our young team.

A lot of this is going to be based on time.  How much time do you have in the preseason to get the offense properly installed.  Weather, field time, kids showing up (not on vacation) all factor into this equation and is one of the reasons I don't panic and I just focus on getting a solid wedge series offense installed at first and work on components of the power series.

In the preseason it is normal to have 2 to 6 weeks of practice prior to the first game week.  If it is only two weeks before we go to game week I am for sure focusing on a wedge series at this age and will build in the power series as we go.  If it 3 to 4 weeks I am going to install the wedge series but also introduce concepts like the toss, pulling, tko blocking, the power scheme, and the motion, running lanes, and backfield action of the power series.  With 5 to 6 weeks I am going to do a little more so that we move into the power series a bit quicker. I  am going to slowly work in power blocking scheme, start teaching the power play (WB first, then QB w/WB sweep action behind it, and then BB with WB/QB sweep action behind it).

Focus on getting, stance, get off, wedge scheme (9, 7, and 5 man),  the base formation installed, on-over-offset, and 1 edge tag.  Work on snap count - DOWN SET GO.  Work on blocking and ball handling skills. 

Base formation (need to figure out if you are direct snap/shotgun/under center) - ((My preference is direct snap - ball going to multiple backs))
ON-OVER-OFFSET from base formation - going from balanced to unbalanced, putting the WB on the LOS, and moving the BB out
One Edge tag - Loose, Trips, and Nasty are often my base edge tags.

These might not be used a lot at first but getting them installed early helps to speed up the power series.  I will go into adapting your power series by using formation variations a bit later.  Right now lets cover this age group :)  A lot of this is being done for the future (in the season and in future seasons - always be forward thinking with your team - what do they need now, what will you need in the future!)

Buck Wedge Series and one more wedge series (Belly or Fenton)

Install SUPER BB WEDGE - wedge with WB's in wedge and QB booting to hold one side of defense.  On "DOWN-SET"
Install GO-GO WEDGE - run QB super wedge on DOWN-SET-GO-GO.

Work drills in to work on pulling, front side TKO, full power scheme (with any needed adjustment calls - on/over/off set)
Install WB power, QB power w/wb power sweep action behind it, BB power w/wb power sweep QB leading behind it (3 plays - one scheme - both directions)
((NOTE - decided on motion or shift to spot of toss))

Install WB power sweep (wb needs to learn how to LOG and QB/BB needs to learn how to make the edge blocks) and QB sweep with WB leading (2 plays - one scheme - both directions)

Work drills on power pass pro scheme
Install Power Pass

Install RAZZLE (WB Reverse in backfield OLINE executing power/power sweep/power pass other way)  Call from sideline.


I am looking to have Power/Power Sweep/Power Pass with RAZZLE installed by mid season or the next few games past mid season.  100% by playoffs.  This is dependent on length of preseason, learning speed of the kids, ability of my coaching staff, and participation level of the players (are they showing up to practice and on time).  This is important as the players need reps to effectively run the power series right.


Jack

« Last Edit: September 12, 2019, 02:55:54 PM by coachgregory »
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Offline coachgregory

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Re: Thoughts on the YDW and Offense in General
« Reply #12 on: September 12, 2019, 02:53:47 PM »
Whats with the different power plays?

I get this a lot so let me explain.

1) Power is your bread and butter.  Eventually as your kids mature you want to run power 50% are more as it is the play that will dominant the defense and wear them down (physically and more importantly mentally/emotionally).  It in a lot of ways is like wedge...where wedge works the midsection power works the head...  The best games I have ever coached against superior team it was a combination of power series/wedge (65% of playcalling) that allowed us to beat those teams.

2) Spreading your power play calling out to different runners allows you to wear down the defense and not wear out your running back.  This allows you in the 4th Quarter to hit the gas on your best runner and give him the ball more when you need it.


WB Power is your base power play.  We build everything we do off this play.  If we are running this out of direct snap we call it TB POWER.  As a base everyone is blocking - BB, QB, and BSG is kicking out, BST is going vertical (c block) up the tunnel, playside is TKO wall and BSTE is taking a radical down block. This is our bread and butter play and as Jerry V. stated the hub of our wheel!  We have variations of this play but this is the root play we run.

QB Power is a complimentary power play.  This has WB Power sweep action behind it to hold/widen the power side DE, OLB, and CB out to defend the D gap.  This makes the BB and BSG kickout easier on the first and second level as both defenders expand to defend the sweep.  QB runs the power alley inside of the sweep and the tighter he holds to the wall the bigger the play is.

BB Power is another complimentary power play. This is not a play we run a lot but when used at the right time (when the board has been set up) this can be a big play at the right time.  It is not a play I expect to run dozen times but running it one to three times a game can have  a big impact on the game.  You are running WB power sweep with the QB leading out behind it which really convinces the defense it is sweep. Especially when you have run QB power a few times and they start sitting on the QB power.  They see the QB expand out with the WB and suddenly the DE, OLB, and CB expand outside again. The BB takes the hidden hand off as the QB spins and he sits until the BSG/BST crosses his face and then he goes vertical up the power tunnel.  I love running this play at the goal line and on a 4th and long situation....our in a change of possession (turnover) play.  Defenses tend to jump the sweep action and over react leaving the power alley wide open for the BB to sneak into.  It is like a trap play with out the trapping backside guard.  Be prepared for DC's to cuss at you from across the field...it's good feeling when it happens. :)

((Note: in DSDW this play works even better because the BB receives the snap and stays low as the QB/TB pulls off the sweep action....often we get the entire LB core selling out on sweep as well as the power perimeter expanding out.   If the FB stays low and doesn't jump the pullers crossing his face this is a huge play.  At the goal line I have called this play maybe a dozen times or more and I can't recall it not scoring or converting.))


Adding in ON/OVER/OFFSET along with EDGE TAGS gives you a lot of variations in play calling.  Factor in backfield looks and additional calls and you have a lot of ways you can use these three plays as the team matures from season to season.

Jack
« Last Edit: September 12, 2019, 03:40:24 PM by coachgregory »
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Offline coachgregory

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Re: Thoughts on the YDW and Offense in General
« Reply #13 on: September 13, 2019, 04:02:02 PM »
Moving on to the older age groups - 9 and Above

Starting at 9 and moving on into HS we can start to add more "features" to the YDW offense.  Bear in mind everything revolves around the power series.  What is the power series you ask...

Well simply put it is Power, Power Sweep, and Power Pass.  It doesn't include the counter/reverse series of plays or the iso series we run.  I want to focus my attentions, initially, on getting the power series up and running in both directions.  I feel that once we get this up and fully implemented it gives a really great base when used in conjunction with edge tags, backfield tags, sideline calls (Razzle/Speed/uncovered passing and the use of basic RPO's) and using the Perimeter Triangle to read the defense.

If you notice i didn't include wedge...trust me it is in there.  However this play is really dependent on age level/player maturity and the league you play in as to how you run it.  Lets say you start this team out at age 7 and you follow my install plan.  That means you have buck wedge/fenton wedge/belly wedge (some variation of these) installed.  You have BB SUPER WEDGE and QB GO-GO wedge installed.   That is a lot of iterations of wedge...you don't need a power series wedge because you have a lot wedge variations already in play.  Don't keep adding the same seasoning to the pot...

Obliviously as there maturity, ability to execute, and experience increase with the power series the less dependent you are on the wedge series.   A good way to view this is Younger AGE > Wedge Series (less complex offense) and Older AGE > Power Series (more complex offense).

As the wedge series becomes less and less a factor the more likely you will need a "power series wedge and/or a counter series wedge" .

Something else to consider, as I stated above, the wedge is like body punches in a fight....power plays are like head shots.  You need to hit the body and wear down the core of your opponent (the DLINE).  This play keeps the defensive line honest and at home... That means they are sticking their noses into the LOS and not trying to flow to power or defeat traps.  Something to consider.

At the older age levels  we segment things out as DOWN PLAYS, SET PLAYS and GO PLAYS...GO-GO PLAYS.  Now why do that?  Well that is simple but with a complex answer (at first).  It is our snap count and I want to have the bulk of our plays start on GO and I want to have a few high percentage success plays go on different points on our snap count to attack an overly aggressive defense or a slow responding/sitting on snap count defense.

At this age level we keep these plays:

BB SUPER WEDGE (no motion/shifting) - we call it DOWN BB WEDGE now...because we go on DOWN.  Bear mind our line comes to the LOS waits for the center to call DOWN...but they are set.  That is because we want to get our plays off fast and not allow the defense to set up.  Most youth defenses don't set their defense quickly.  You want to eat up your opponents time outs...   No Huddle - call play from a wrist coach/signal move to the LOS quickly and get set.  Watch panic set into the eyes of the opposing staff.  You are now dictating the tempo...which allows you to dictate the play calling...which allows you to dictate the flow of the entire game.  A defense in panic mode is a coaching staff in panic mode and a coaching staff in panic mode panics on offense and special teams...

(This is a 9 man wedge with QB booting out to the most dangers side of the defense (best DE/OLB/CB trio) to hold them in place for a moment.  The beauty of this is if the QB is being ignored by the trio - add KEEP...the rest is history...)  It is our first sound play.

Go-Go Wedge (no motion/shifting) - Again we call it Go-Go QB Wedge because it is super wedge on DOWN-SET-GO-GO.  Often we get an easy 5 yards and replay that down as the defense jumps and we either get a big wedge play or 5 yards/repeat down.  I have found I don't like to put my luck in the hands of the official so if get the call and it gives us more yards great...if it doesn't chances are we get some positive yards and our kids don't get a crazy flag for jumping because the defense drew them. It is pre-planned and packaged this way intentionally.  It is our long snap count or freeze play with us not counting on the officials to make the call.  If the defense jumps we are going on the second GO no matter what. I have found this to be more successful and we literally doubled our OFFSIDE calls against the defense because we trap the defender in the Neutral zone.  (we play by NCAA rules).

power series BB Wedge /QB Wedge.  Once you are no longer using the wedge series you need to insert a GO (normal snap count) wedge that marries up to your power series to maintain the body blows to the defense.

Power Series

Basic Plays:

WB Power (TB Power in DSDW)
QB Power w/WB power sweep behind it.
BB Power w/WB Power sweep and QB leading behind it.

WB Power Sweep
QB Power Sweep w/ WB/BB leading (QB Power Speed - BB logs DE and QB reads next defender outside (typically CB))

Power Pass (flood pass - BB flat, WB 8 & out, TE 8 & corner)   Power Switch Pass (WB/TE switch), Power Drag Pass (BSTE drags replaces BB who stays in and block)


Additional Power Plays

Dealing with a 2/6 tech look or any big gap in between an interior DT and wide DE.  We part it as the defense is playing the C gap hard and leaving the B gap open.

WB Power Part (WB Power Wham Part)
QB Power Part (QB Power Wham Part) w/ WB power sweep behind it.
BB Power Part (no wham)  WB power sweep w/QB leading behind it.

BB Power Trap (BSG trap w/ PST/PSTE climbing second level to FBI)  /WB power sweep behind it (QB leading if possible).
QB Power Trap (as above with BB kicking DE as well).  /WB power sweep behind it.

Will get into additional adjustments and dive into the weeds about the above in a later post.

At age 9 to 10 I want WB POWER, WB POWER SWEEP, QB POWER, QB POWER SWEEP, BB POWER, POWER PASS.  Those plays are must haves in my opinion for the power series to really click.

Jack


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Offline gumby_in_co

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Re: Thoughts on the YDW and Offense in General
« Reply #14 on: September 14, 2019, 10:49:19 PM »
For the first time in 8 seasons I've been coaching with him, Mahonz has let me install a wedge . . . I mean a real one. So I searched my archives for your wedge progression presentation. My only addition is a "buzz your feet" step that helps them stay patient as they form the wedge. With each rep, they are getting faster at fitting up. 2 practices so far and I'm very pleased with the progress. As it always seems to be the case, my 2nd group is better at it than my first. I may even be able to talk Mahonz into a "wedge" team.

Anyway, you're the guy I learned wedge from, so thanks for that and everything else.
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