Author Topic: Outside Zone....Running the Defense Horizontal  (Read 13314 times)

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Offline seeindouble

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Re: Outside Zone....Running the Defense Horizontal
« Reply #30 on: April 02, 2010, 10:32:07 PM »


 



Denver made 6th round running backs into superstars because they could run the zone. Portis, a higher round draft pick failed in Denver and wanted out and has done well in another system.





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Mahonz, didn't Portis get something like 1500 yds His rookie season. And I beg to differ on wanting out, I can almost guarantee you that He's happy to be reunited with Shanahan again. Denver was the best thing that ever happened to Him, ever since He's been in DC, it's one injury after another...

Offline mahonz

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Re: Outside Zone....Running the Defense Horizontal
« Reply #31 on: April 02, 2010, 11:24:54 PM »

Mahonz, didn't Portis get something like 1500 yds His rookie season. And I beg to differ on wanting out, I can almost guarantee you that He's happy to be reunited with Shanahan again. Denver was the best thing that ever happened to Him, ever since He's been in DC, it's one injury after another...

It seems he has had some good years there in Washington....he did great in Denver but complained about the system...his team mates...the coach....came in as a real punk with his hats and all. Bigger than the team.

Dont know about his reunion with Shanahan...Shanahan traded him for asking for more money. With Shanahan you never asked for more money in the middle of a contract. Plus the Broncos were realing from the Davis contract...they gave him the big bucks and he then quickly blew up his knee ending his career.

He could not run the zone well at all. What made him good in Denver were his once per game 60 yard runs. He had a great burst once he got free but as far as plugging into Denvers system.... I'd have to say he failed or at least wasnt around long enough to give things a real chance.

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Offline Pearls of Wisdom

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Re: Outside Zone....Running the Defense Horizontal
« Reply #32 on: April 14, 2010, 04:08:04 PM »
Something on ZONE BLOCKING from a Nebraska Fan site:

BIGHUSKERFAN.COM
BHF LOCKER ROOM => Diehard Football Forum => Topic started by: destroyer71 on October 06, 2008, 12:04:04 AM

Title: Zone Blocking
Post by: destroyer71 on October 06, 2008, 12:04:04 AM
Lately there has been a lot of discussion about zone blocking and that Nebraska should scrap it.  I don't have any problems with people who don't think that we should use zone blocking but I do mind it when people try to twist the facts about zone blocking and what it is in order to try and get others to believe their thoughts.  The first misconceptions I've seen about zone blocking at Nebraska is that it is a soft blocking scheme that doesn't allow the offensive lineman to get physical.  The second main misconception about zone blocking at Nebraska is that  a lot of people seem to think that it was brought to Nebraska by Bill Callahan. Now I also want to explain why zone blocking was created and is now used by every NFL team and the vast majoirty, possibly every, FBS (D-1A) team.

Where it Came From
Way back when, defenses and offenses played straight up man on man football at the line of scrimmage and it was a battle of who was a better football player.  However defenses started to get more and more complicated and defensive coordinators starting using slants and stunts to throw off "man on man" blocking schemes.  Zone blocking was created to handle those slants and stunts that defenses would us to throw off "man" blocking.

Zone Blocking Compared to "Man" Blocking
The following diagram is what would happen if a offense used "man" blocking against a defense that used a simple stunt.  This is the right side of the offensive line.  If the end who's lined up on the tackle slants to the "B" gap he will cause the tackle to not only fail on the block but he may also knocked the guard off his line to the linebacker.
(http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p211/tommyw57/NoZone.jpg)

If this exact same stunt is done into a zone scheme the tackle and the guard will be responsible for blocking the end and the linebacker.  They'll be naturally using a double team to block the defensive end so if he slants inside the guard will have already been ready to block and attack the defensive end.  They'll be taking the first level defender, the end, to the second level defender, the linebacker.  Make no mistake about it the goal is to move the defensive lineman back to linebacker depth.
(http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p211/tommyw57/Zone.jpg)

Why It's Used
The beauty of zone blocking is in it's simplicity, this is the reason why all pro teams and most college teams use zone blocking.  All an offensive lineman (TE's included) has to know is if he is covered or uncovered along with if the player to his backside, in reference to the playside, is covered or uncovered.

Misconceptions
The first misconception about zone blocking that needs to be tackled is that it is a "soft" blocking scheme.  The goal of the double team on the defensive lineman is to knock him back into the linebacker.  That is no different than any other blocking scheme that people often will clamor for.  Softness in the run game comes from two different aspects, coaching and players, that is a different debate for a different thread on Nebraska.

The second misconception about zone blocking is that Bill Callahan was the coach who brought it too Lincoln.  That couldn't be further from the truth.  By the mid 1990's Tom Osborne and Milt Tenopir had switched almost exclusively to zone blocking and gap blocking.  Not to get too of tangent but for those who don't know what gap blocking is, it's what's used on "Power O", "Counters" and partially on "G Options" and on "Inside Traps".  But no matter what you hear from anybody else, Tom Osborne used zone blocking extensively during our national championship run of the 1990's.

Zone Blocking is here and isn't going anywhere no matter what anybody on here sitting behind their keyboard and computer screen says.  Hundreds of incredible football minds who get paid 6 and 7 figure salaries have decided that it's either the best or second best (behind gap blocking) run blocking strategy to be used in order to ensure that they have jobs at the end of the season. 
My Contact Info: Coach Bill Mountjoy phone: 804-716-7038 EST /  Email: butzadams@hotmail.com

Offline Pearls of Wisdom

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Re: Outside Zone....Running the Defense Horizontal
« Reply #33 on: April 24, 2010, 01:36:12 PM »
COMMUNICATION OF DEFENSIVE NUMBERED TECHNIQUES ON THE ZONE AND COUNTER/POWER BLOCKING:

Have the first covered offensive lineman outside the “Center Box”  call out the number technique the DLM is in.  This is primarily because you look for double teams from inside/out.   The following thinking uses the Inside Zone & the Counter as examples (since on the INSIDE ZONE you double outside, and on the COUNTER you double inside – in reverse order):

EXAMPLE:  The Right Tackle is the first covered lineman outside the Center (covered by a 4I, 4, or 5 technique).  He calls out that technique as early as possible for the following reasons:

1.   RT calls “4I” (inside shoulder). 
A) On the INSIDE ZONE – this alerts the uncovered RG that he will most likely have to “take over” the 4I after the initial double team and push off the LOS.
B)   ON the COUNTER – this alerts the TE that he will most likely have to come off the hip of the 4I for the backside LB (probability of no double).
     
2.   RT calls “4” (head up).
A)   On BOTH the INSIDE ZONE and the COUNTER - since a 4 technique might slant or pinch down, play the RT tough, or loop out – it’s a 50/50 proposition as to who will end up on him after the other comes off the double team (depending on which of the 3 charges he employs).
     
3.   RT calls “5” (outside shoulder).
A)   On the INSIDE ZONE – this alerts the uncovered RG  that he will most likely end up on the LB (probability of no double).
B)   On the COUNTER – this alerts the TE than he will most likely end up on the 5 technique (with the RT coming off the double).


NOTE:  If the first covered lineman outside the Center was the Right Guard  – he would make a 2I (inside shoulder), 2 (head up),  or 3 (outside shoulder) call, which would alert the Center (on the INSIDE ZONE), and the Right Tackle (on the COUNTER) as to the probabilities on those plays.

NOTE:  THIS IS NOT A GIVEAWAY TO THE DEFENSE, SINCE THESE CALLS ARE USED IN ZONE BLOCKING, COUNTER/POWER BLOCKING, & EVEN SOME ZONE PASS PROTECTIONS (& THEY ARE MADE ON BOTH SIDES).

RUSS GRIMM QUOTE:  “ALWAYS KNOW WHAT TO EXPECT BEFORE THE SNAP – AND ANTICIPATE THE WORST CASE SCENARIO (SO YOU WON’T COME TO THE SIDELINE & GIVE THE ALIBI THAT “HE SURPRISED ME”)!!!!!  EXAMPLE:  THE WORSE CASE SCENARIO FOR A TE DOWNBLOCKING A 5 TECHNIQUE IS FOR THE 5 TECHNIQUE TO LOOP INTO HIM (RATHER THAN STAYING IN A 5)!
My Contact Info: Coach Bill Mountjoy phone: 804-716-7038 EST /  Email: butzadams@hotmail.com