Author Topic: Outside Zone  (Read 3196 times)

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Offline nwmocb

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Outside Zone
« on: June 29, 2010, 12:08:45 PM »
I was talking to a coach that runs the zone blocking scheme and he said that Nebraska will use a short pull by their guards and have their tackles rip through to the linebacker has anyone ever heard of this?  Sounds very youth friendly.

Offline Pearls of Wisdom

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Re: Outside Zone
« Reply #1 on: June 29, 2010, 12:45:25 PM »
I was talking to a coach that runs the zone blocking scheme and he said that Nebraska will use a short pull by their guards and have their tackles rip through to the linebacker has anyone ever heard of this?  Sounds very youth friendly.

What DEFENSES will that apply to?  Blocking combos & techniques would vary with the fronts.  There are 5 basic fronts found in the game today (attached).  See how that style of blocking holds up vs. these 5 fronts.

PS:  FORMER Nebraska O-Line Coach Milt Tenopir blocked the Outside Zone that way vs. the Okie front years ago.

ATTACHMENT (draw the play up vs. THESE vs. fronts):

[attachment deleted by admin]
« Last Edit: June 29, 2010, 01:01:23 PM by BillMountjoy »
My Contact Info: Coach Bill Mountjoy phone: 804-716-7038 EST /  Email: butzadams@hotmail.com

Offline nwmocb

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Re: Outside Zone
« Reply #2 on: June 29, 2010, 02:16:27 PM »
Well we are just zone blocking our jet sweep play.  But we face okie, jam and even.  I am thinking about running some kind of inside or outside zone play off of the jet motion.

Offline Pearls of Wisdom

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Re: Outside Zone
« Reply #3 on: June 29, 2010, 02:44:27 PM »
Well we are just zone blocking our jet sweep play.  But we face okie, jam and even.  I am thinking about running some kind of inside or outside zone play off of the jet motion.

MOST use Outside Zone blocking on Jet.  There is MUCH about that on this forum (Offense: Zone Blocking)
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Offline nwmocb

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Re: Outside Zone
« Reply #4 on: June 29, 2010, 02:53:37 PM »
So what do you think about the way I described to you?

Offline nwmocb

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Re: Outside Zone
« Reply #5 on: June 29, 2010, 03:01:54 PM »
Bill something happened I couldn't get your attachment and your reply disappeared.

Offline Pearls of Wisdom

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Re: Outside Zone
« Reply #6 on: June 29, 2010, 03:04:33 PM »
That might be fine on JET if you want to get wide, BUT, your O-Line would have to "RUN LIKE SCALDED DOGS" because the Jet sometimes hits faster than the blocking can develop!  It is described here (old Nebraska way):

OUTSIDE ZONE BLOCKING (we don't do it this way - but here is a description of it):

The main objective on the outside zone play is to initially try to get the ball outside.  With that in mind, we are trying to force a hook block on all down defenders.

All of our linemen that are covered with a down defender executes what we refer to as a “rip-reach block”.

To execute such a block, we have the covered linemen take a hard lateral stretch step to the call side.  We want to out-flank the down defender on that first step.

On the second step, we allow our covered linemen to use a crossover step to the callside.

The next thing we have him do is rip his inside arm through the callside armpit of the defender, similar to the rip that a defensive lineman will sometimes use on a pass rush.

We want our covered lineman to lean on the defender after he rips through the armpit and force his stomach upfield.  If he does not do this, then his stomach will be facing the sideline and he loses sight of the linebacker.  He will now try to escape for the linebacker.

If the playside guard and tackle are both covered, the tackle would have his defender by himself.  He would go through the stretch, crossover step and rip technique, and then lean on his man, not thinking about escaping for the linebacker.

The backside tackle, upon getting to the line of scrimmage, checks if the backside guard is covered.  If he is, the tackle will work with the guard even if he is also covered.

The uncovered linemen use a technique that we refer to as “pull and ovetake”.  Before we can overtake the down defender to the call, we first must get our helmet past him, then get on him and roll him upfield.

The pull must be a lateral pull.  We want to gain depth and distance on our first step on the pull.  The one foot split is essential if you are going to get the overtake.

There will be occasions when the covered linemen can’t get un-hooked from the covering defender.  If this does happen, the pull and overtaking offensive lineman should keep pulling and at times will have to come all the way around for the linebacker. 

As mentioned earlier, the backside tackle works with the guard if the guard is covered.  This means he would pull and overtake the man on the guard.

Some teams use in-line stunts to try to disrupt our zone schemes.  The secret offensively is technique.  If two adjacent offensive linemen are covered and the proper stretch is taken on the first step, it will become natural to pick up slants and loop-arounds.


NOTE:  We PREFER Alex Gibbs' method - which more often than not CRAMS the C gap (ATTACHED):
Alabama runs it like this, & they are the best zone blocking team in America (IMO)!




[attachment deleted by admin]
« Last Edit: June 29, 2010, 03:24:59 PM by BillMountjoy »
My Contact Info: Coach Bill Mountjoy phone: 804-716-7038 EST /  Email: butzadams@hotmail.com