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Offline jem

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Simple Zone blocking question and answer article
« on: July 05, 2010, 11:25:37 AM »
Below is a question and answer from a website I ran across while researching option.  I thought I would post it here for you Zone blocking guys, so I could hear your thoughts on Coach Louis' answer.


Expert: Coach Louis - 10/31/2006

Question
Hey Coach,
I started at quarterback in college for four years in a wing-T and triple option offense.  I now am fascinated by the spread offense, in particular, the zone blocking techniques that they employ.  I have some knowledge of zone blocking but don't know the terms that are always used.  Anyway, when my team played against a 4-4 defense with the outside linebackers at the line( making it look like a 6-2), they gave us some trouble.  For one, the did a lot of slanting with the d-line and that gave our kids trouble.  And two, the outside linebackers, especially the Sam, would give us trouble even when running inside the tackle.  How do I teach the linemen to block a team that slants a lot? 
My second area that I would like you to comment about is the no huddle offense.  I have an offense that I would like to use and would not mind putting in the no huddle or at least a check with me system.  The main problem for me is that I do not want other teams picking up on the signal calling and I don't have enough terminology to make it work.  Could you please give me some advice on this as well?
Thank You and hopefully this all makes sense,
Nate Skelton

---------------------------------------------

Answer
Dear Nate,
Here is a simple zone block that can be used at any level of coaching. When zone blocking, we do not care where the defender lines up we only care about what he does when the ball is snapped. We want our offensive linemen to stop any defender from penetrating through the play side gaps (the side to where the ball is going).

We want our linemen to take a short control lateral step with the foot nearest the play side gap. He slides his head in front of the defender followed by his body. This is done weather or not there is a defender in the gap. For example, if we are running a sweep play to the right side, we have our linemen take a control step into their right gap. If we are running a sweep play to the left side, we would have our linemen take a control step into the left gap.

This tactic will stop all stunts or delay blitzes into the play side gaps.

Another tactic being used more and more is to run your sweep plays with no gaps at all. This will have the same effect as a zone block, stopping the defense from gaining defensive penetration into your backfield. And it works.

Second question, the no-huddle offense. If you want to know more about the no-huddle offense, Coach G. Mark McElroy has written a great book called:
"Coaching The No-Huddle Offense" It has everything you want to know about the no-huddle offense.

Before you ask, no, I am not getting paid to sell the book and I do not make any money from it what so ever.
I hope I was of help. If you have anymore questions please let me know I will be happy to help you.
Your friend, Coach Louis

j
ps.  below is the link

http://en.allexperts.com/q/Football-Instruction-2069/Zone-Blocking-Huddle-Offense.htm
« Last Edit: July 05, 2010, 11:29:29 AM by jem »
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Offline Pearls of Wisdom

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Re: Simple Zone blocking question and answer article
« Reply #1 on: July 05, 2010, 12:09:44 PM »
Below is a question and answer from a website I ran across while researching option.  I thought I would post it here for you Zone blocking guys, so I could hear your thoughts on Coach Louis' answer.


Expert: Coach Louis - 10/31/2006

Question
Hey Coach,
I started at quarterback in college for four years in a wing-T and triple option offense.  I now am fascinated by the spread offense, in particular, the zone blocking techniques that they employ.  I have some knowledge of zone blocking but don't know the terms that are always used.  Anyway, when my team played against a 4-4 defense with the outside linebackers at the line( making it look like a 6-2), they gave us some trouble.  For one, the did a lot of slanting with the d-line and that gave our kids trouble.  And two, the outside linebackers, especially the Sam, would give us trouble even when running inside the tackle.  How do I teach the linemen to block a team that slants a lot? 
My second area that I would like you to comment about is the no huddle offense.  I have an offense that I would like to use and would not mind putting in the no huddle or at least a check with me system.  The main problem for me is that I do not want other teams picking up on the signal calling and I don't have enough terminology to make it work.  Could you please give me some advice on this as well?
Thank You and hopefully this all makes sense,
Nate Skelton

---------------------------------------------

Answer
Dear Nate,
Here is a simple zone block that can be used at any level of coaching. When zone blocking, we do not care where the defender lines up we only care about what he does when the ball is snapped. We want our offensive linemen to stop any defender from penetrating through the play side gaps (the side to where the ball is going).

We want our linemen to take a short control lateral step with the foot nearest the play side gap. He slides his head in front of the defender followed by his body. This is done weather or not there is a defender in the gap. For example, if we are running a sweep play to the right side, we have our linemen take a control step into their right gap. If we are running a sweep play to the left side, we would have our linemen take a control step into the left gap.

This tactic will stop all stunts or delay blitzes into the play side gaps.

Another tactic being used more and more is to run your sweep plays with no gaps at all. This will have the same effect as a zone block, stopping the defense from gaining defensive penetration into your backfield. And it works.

Second question, the no-huddle offense. If you want to know more about the no-huddle offense, Coach G. Mark McElroy has written a great book called:
"Coaching The No-Huddle Offense" It has everything you want to know about the no-huddle offense.

Before you ask, no, I am not getting paid to sell the book and I do not make any money from it what so ever.
I hope I was of help. If you have anymore questions please let me know I will be happy to help you.
Your friend, Coach Louis

j
ps.  below is the link

http://en.allexperts.com/q/Football-Instruction-2069/Zone-Blocking-Huddle-Offense.htm

Zone blocking was introduced into the game to HANDLE slanting defenses.  It rendered slanting defenses ineffective!!!

This article EXPLAINS IT:

http://assets.espn.go.com/ncf/columns/davie/1440703.html
My Contact Info: Coach Bill Mountjoy phone: 804-716-7038 EST /  Email: butzadams@hotmail.com

Offline jem

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Re: Simple Zone blocking question and answer article
« Reply #2 on: July 05, 2010, 12:23:10 PM »
Bill what was your thoughts on his answer to the sweep... by going zero line spits?

and since he didn't get into much detail on the zone do you think his explanation would help or hurt coaches reading it.  By his explanation he is explaining scoop blocking and if I read this and if I had never read anything else then this is all I would think Zone is... just scoop blocking.  There is no mention of combos etc.    I like to call this version the All-Scoops method.  Of course in his defense he did say this was a simplified method.  And to be truthful I played with this version for the Triple option before I ever met you and you gave me a deeper understanding of zone.  So I am not against what he is say.... I am just curious if you think his explanation could cause people to misunderstand zone?

j
PS... the article you posted is more like the answer I would have expected... that was the reason for my post.
« Last Edit: July 05, 2010, 12:30:14 PM by jem »
"I truly believe it’s not what you know – it’s what you can teach."  Tony DeMeo

"Victory is always possible for the person who refuses to stop fighting."  Napoleon Hill

"Whether You Think You Can or Can't, You're Right"--Henry Ford

Offline Pearls of Wisdom

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Re: Simple Zone blocking question and answer article
« Reply #3 on: July 05, 2010, 12:56:48 PM »
Bill what was your thoughts on his answer to the sweep... by going zero line spits?

and since he didn't get into much detail on the zone do you think his explanation would help or hurt coaches reading it.  By his explanation he is explaining scoop blocking and if I read this and if I had never read anything else then this is all I would think Zone is... just scoop blocking.  There is no mention of combos etc.    I like to call this version the All-Scoops method.  Of course in his defense he did say this was a simplified method.  And to be truthful I played with this version for the Triple option before I ever met you and you gave me a deeper understanding of zone.  So I am not against what he is say.... I am just curious if you think his explanation could cause people to misunderstand zone?

j
PS... the article you posted is more like the answer I would have expected... that was the reason for my post.

We NEVER close to "0" line splits.  18" is tight enough (at the OUTSIDE - he COULD go 12").

He didn't SPECIFY "Inside Zone", OR, "Outside Zone".  These are OUR zone techniques, which we copied from Alex Gibbs & Joe Bugel (IMO the two BEST teachers of zone blocking ever).  Note:  National Chap Alabama teaches it like this also (you can get DVD's from A, Gibbs, Bugel, AND Alabama, on zone blocking):

INSIDE ZONE TECHNIQUE (DRIVE BLOCK TECHNIQUES):

A.   COVERED:  Take a 6” lead step aiming eyes at playside number.  Second step to crotch (do not crossover).  Hands at base of shoulder pads.

1.   If DLM stretches with you – stay on block and uncovered teammate works up on LBer.

2.   If DLM anchors on you – double team with uncovered teammate.  Stay on block until wiped off & then work upfield  aiming eyes to playside number of LBer.

3.   If DLM slants inside – force him to flatten his slant and double team with uncovered teammate.  Stay on block until wiped off & then work upfield aiming eyes to playside number of LBer.

B.   UNCOVERED:  Take a 6” lead step aiming eyes at helmet of DLM.  Do not cross over on second step.

1.   If helmet goes out on your 1st step  – 2nd step upfield aiming eyes to playside number of LBer.

2.   If helmet stays put – double team (hip to hip) with covered teammate & wipe him off on Lber.

3.   If helmet slants inside - get eyes to his playside number.  Double team with covered teammate & wipe him off on LBer.



OUTSIDE ZONE TECHNIQUE (REACH BLOCK TECHNIQUES):

A.    COVERED:  Take a 6” lead step aiming eyes at playside arm pit.  Second step slightly outside crotch (do not crossover).  Inside hand on midline & outside hand under armpit.

1.   If DLM stretches with you – stay on block and uncovered teammate works up on LBer.

2.   If DLM anchors on you – stiff arm him down to uncovered teammate.  Stay on block until you feel uncovered teammate & then come off aiming eyes to playside armpit of LBer.

3.   If DLM slants inside – force him to flatten his slant by stiff arming him inside.  Stay on block until you feel uncovered teammate & then come off aiming eyes to playside number of LBer.

B.   UNCOVERED:  Take a 6” lead step aiming eyes at helmet of DLM.  You may crossover on second step.

1.   If helmet goes out & you haven’t contacted DLM by 3rd. step – work upfield  aiming eyes to playside armpit of LBer.

2.   If helmet stays put – shove him over to covered teammate and work upfield aiming eyes to playside armpit of LBer.

3.   If helmet slants inside – aim eyes to his playside armpit.  Take him over & wipe covered teammate off to LBer.


See photo of O-Line Splits:




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My Contact Info: Coach Bill Mountjoy phone: 804-716-7038 EST /  Email: butzadams@hotmail.com

Offline jem

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Re: Simple Zone blocking question and answer article
« Reply #4 on: July 05, 2010, 01:55:01 PM »
We NEVER close to "0" line splits.  18" is tight enough (at the OUTSIDE - he COULD go 12").

He didn't SPECIFY "Inside Zone", OR, "Outside Zone".  These are OUR zone techniques, which we copied from Alex Gibbs & Joe Bugel (IMO the two BEST teachers of zone blocking ever).  Note:  National Chap Alabama teaches it like this also (you can get DVD's from A, Gibbs, Bugel, AND Alabama, on zone blocking):

INSIDE ZONE TECHNIQUE (DRIVE BLOCK TECHNIQUES):

A.   COVERED:  Take a 6” lead step aiming eyes at playside number.  Second step to crotch (do not crossover).  Hands at base of shoulder pads.

1.   If DLM stretches with you – stay on block and uncovered teammate works up on LBer.

2.   If DLM anchors on you – double team with uncovered teammate.  Stay on block until wiped off & then work upfield  aiming eyes to playside number of LBer.

3.   If DLM slants inside – force him to flatten his slant and double team with uncovered teammate.  Stay on block until wiped off & then work upfield aiming eyes to playside number of LBer.

B.   UNCOVERED:  Take a 6” lead step aiming eyes at helmet of DLM.  Do not cross over on second step.

1.   If helmet goes out on your 1st step  – 2nd step upfield aiming eyes to playside number of LBer.

2.   If helmet stays put – double team (hip to hip) with covered teammate & wipe him off on Lber.

3.   If helmet slants inside - get eyes to his playside number.  Double team with covered teammate & wipe him off on LBer.



OUTSIDE ZONE TECHNIQUE (REACH BLOCK TECHNIQUES):

A.    COVERED:  Take a 6” lead step aiming eyes at playside arm pit.  Second step slightly outside crotch (do not crossover).  Inside hand on midline & outside hand under armpit.

1.   If DLM stretches with you – stay on block and uncovered teammate works up on LBer.

2.   If DLM anchors on you – stiff arm him down to uncovered teammate.  Stay on block until you feel uncovered teammate & then come off aiming eyes to playside armpit of LBer.

3.   If DLM slants inside – force him to flatten his slant by stiff arming him inside.  Stay on block until you feel uncovered teammate & then come off aiming eyes to playside number of LBer.

B.   UNCOVERED:  Take a 6” lead step aiming eyes at helmet of DLM.  You may crossover on second step.

1.   If helmet goes out & you haven’t contacted DLM by 3rd. step – work upfield  aiming eyes to playside armpit of LBer.

2.   If helmet stays put – shove him over to covered teammate and work upfield aiming eyes to playside armpit of LBer.

3.   If helmet slants inside – aim eyes to his playside armpit.  Take him over & wipe covered teammate off to LBer.


See photo of O-Line Splits:

And that was my point.... I just thought it kinda of a dangerous response because it might leave people confused about zone... IMO.  It was a pretty vague response to me as to what Zone is and I really consider what he said more of an area blocking scheme than a zone scheme.

Just my thoughts....

j
"I truly believe it’s not what you know – it’s what you can teach."  Tony DeMeo

"Victory is always possible for the person who refuses to stop fighting."  Napoleon Hill

"Whether You Think You Can or Can't, You're Right"--Henry Ford

Offline defensewins

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Re: Simple Zone blocking question and answer article
« Reply #5 on: July 05, 2010, 03:09:57 PM »
Zone blocking is the toughest yet most simplistic blocking scheme on the face of the planet.  It is so simple on the surface, yet, when you have some one "explain" it to you for the first time, you are left thinking, "don't piss on me and call it rain." 

There are many different types of zone blocking.  Not just inside and outside, but many different methods of each, and different implementations for each of them.  To any one interested in zone blocking, I would pick one method and apply it to every situation possible.  Don't chase ghosts, but apply the method to every realistic and possible situation. 

In our system, the varsity OL coach boils it down to TWO things: attack the living $hit out of your aiming point and protect your gap at all costs. 

If I walked away from a meeting to talk about zone and all I left with were those two things, I'd be upset to say the very least.  Yet, after being with him to see how he installs it, teaches it and drills it, etc., every question/situation that arises goes back to those two things. 

At the end of the day, it is just like anything else in football.  You can't get everything in one sitting.  Zone blocking takes care of all the variables, so there needs to be a system/teaching/instruction/drills/installation to handle all of the variables.  You need to have follow-up questions and dialogue with a seasoned veteran.  You can't take a playbook that you've never coached or played in and install it with your team.  That is ludicrous.  Maybe the response in the Q & A was just step one in a 27 step process???  I don't know.  All I do know is that understanding everything about zone blocking is a long process and there is no way that the answer was "zone blocking in a can."

Offline Pearls of Wisdom

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Re: Simple Zone blocking question and answer article
« Reply #6 on: July 05, 2010, 03:32:21 PM »
Joe Pendry of National Champs Alabama has the simplest (& damned effective) answer:

Assign everyone a MAN, & if your man is a LBer & you are having trouble getting to him - zone with your next teammate to the playside (who will be covered).  PERIOD, EXCLAMATION POINT, END OF DISCUSSION!

Pendry has a 30 minute DVD which explains it all SIMPLY (Coaches need to study that, AND, show it to their players, because "confused coaches confuse the players")!

Using JUST that - we scored close to 600 points in 13 games this year, & the starters were usually out by mid third quarter.  It DOESN'T HAVE to be any more complex than that!

Still think Bob Davie's article explains it so that ANYONE should be able to understand it:

Here it is again:
http://assets.espn.go.com/ncf/columns/davie/1440703.html
« Last Edit: July 05, 2010, 04:33:53 PM by BillMountjoy »
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Offline cyflcoach

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Re: Simple Zone blocking question and answer article
« Reply #7 on: July 15, 2010, 02:08:37 AM »
Why is it our nature as human beings to take something that's relatively simple and turn it into anything but that?  ::)  I think Coach Pendry's definition is right on target.  So many people, including many coaches, really think it involves so much more than what it actually entails, hence the hesitancy to attempt to coach it at the youth level.

Dave Hartman
CYFL Coach 
"It's not the will to win that matters - everyone has that. It's the will to prepare to win that matters."

Paul "Bear" Bryant

Offline jem

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Re: Simple Zone blocking question and answer article
« Reply #8 on: July 15, 2010, 09:22:05 AM »
Why is it our nature as human beings to take something that's relatively simple and turn it into anything but that?  ::)  I think Coach Pendry's definition is right on target.  So many people, including many coaches, really think it involves so much more than what it actually entails, hence the hesitancy to attempt to coach it at the youth level.

Dave Hartman
CYFL Coach

Good Morning Dave...............

I assume that is a rhetorical question, but I'll answer anyways;

Because we ARE Human  :)

My wife ask me one day how come I wake up Happy.  (She is not a morning person... she doesn't want to talk or smile or even be bothered when she wakes up.  I wake up ready to rock.)  I told her that I just decided one day that I was gonna wake up happy.  That's it.  She never has understood my answer.  She still ask that question, I still answer the same way and she still doesn't understand.  The funny thing was I used to not be a morning person, I was just like her and one day I just decided to become one because I was tired of being grumpy every morning. 

I think when the answers are easy we feel cheated because we are taught when something sounds to good to be true, then, it is probably NOT true.  Also people don't like taking responsibility in general and when we hear an answer that is so easy that anybody can do it, we don't believe it because now we have no excuse not to do something and we love our excuses.  It is much easier to continue with the status quo and believe some things are just beyond us.

Just some thoughts....

j
"I truly believe it’s not what you know – it’s what you can teach."  Tony DeMeo

"Victory is always possible for the person who refuses to stop fighting."  Napoleon Hill

"Whether You Think You Can or Can't, You're Right"--Henry Ford

Offline cyflcoach

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Re: Simple Zone blocking question and answer article
« Reply #9 on: July 16, 2010, 12:58:43 AM »
I agree Jem.  Although we can't control many things we encounter in our lives, we always have a choice as to what way we will respond to them, don't we?  Another rhetorical question LOL!!!

Have a good one!

Dave Hartman
CYFL Coach
 

"It's not the will to win that matters - everyone has that. It's the will to prepare to win that matters."

Paul "Bear" Bryant

Offline jem

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Re: Simple Zone blocking question and answer article
« Reply #10 on: July 16, 2010, 01:22:49 AM »
I agree Jem.  Although we can't control many things we encounter in our lives, we always have a choice as to what way we will respond to them, don't we?  Another rhetorical question LOL!!!

Have a good one!

Dave Hartman
CYFL Coach
:D ;D :)

You to Dave.. have a great weekend.... I am heading to the beach for the first time in 2 years..... yeah!!!

See how beautiful the Water is...

Just look at all that WATER  :P

see ya later

j
PS.. you might have to right click the picture and tell it to open in a new tab... if ya wanna see the beach...LOL


« Last Edit: July 19, 2010, 01:59:30 AM by jem »
"I truly believe it’s not what you know – it’s what you can teach."  Tony DeMeo

"Victory is always possible for the person who refuses to stop fighting."  Napoleon Hill

"Whether You Think You Can or Can't, You're Right"--Henry Ford