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Author Topic: Defending the on-side kick  (Read 8208 times)

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Offline cjl103

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Re: Defending the on-side kick
« Reply #15 on: May 21, 2015, 02:54:38 PM »
Thanks for the help with this there was a lot of good advice we will be trying out. Also, what do you think about switching to a 6 - 3 - 2 alignment against the teams that only on-side kick? 

Offline Ronin

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Re: Defending the on-side kick
« Reply #16 on: May 21, 2015, 03:23:38 PM »
For what it is worth, I use 8-2-1 with our front line running straight at the bad guy they intend to block as soon as the ball is kicked instead of running backwards to give the runner time to collect the ball.  If it isn't an onside, they are attacking.  The block rate seems way higher doing this.  Here is a link with some good info on the 8-2-1.  Hope it helps...

http://footballislifeblog.blogspot.com/2012/11/the-8-2-1-kickoff-return.html

Also, instead of counting guys from the outside in, we count from the ball out.  The new rules with requiring a more balanced kickoff line allow us to do this.

Offline Bob Goodman

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Re: Defending the on-side kick
« Reply #17 on: May 21, 2015, 06:55:44 PM »
Quote
On a slow rolling or too sharply angled kickoff, sometimes produced by a really bad kick, my instruction for team R front line players is not to advance past their restraining line at all unless it looks like it's going to get at least halfway to that line.  Let it roll dead in the neutral zone or go out of bounds there rather than taking the chance on touching the ball & letting K recover.
A "poison" call from the bench helps too.

Offline Bob Goodman

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Re: Defending the on-side kick
« Reply #18 on: May 21, 2015, 07:07:39 PM »
what do you think about switching to a 6 - 3 - 2 alignment against the teams that only on-side kick?
6-3-2 is about equally good to 5-4-2.  Draw it on paper to scale, and look at the distances players have to go to get to kicks placed variously.  Then take into acc't that, esp. w a helmet, it's easier to see a ball in front of you than one much to the side, let alone behind you, and also that it takes longer to turn & move sideways or backward.

Also, don't line up based on covering the field sideline to sideline, but rather according to where the ball is placed for the kick.  Most children's teams like to kick from the center, but as long as they have the option to move that mark between the hashes, allow for that possibility, and consider the time it takes for an angled kick to get to a spot on the field.

Offline ZACH

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Re: Defending the on-side kick
« Reply #19 on: May 21, 2015, 07:44:40 PM »
Baseball players

In fielders do a great job bc they essentially train for ground balls all spring. 

Typically I put 2-3 to the side theyre kicking in the front row

Second row is our best catchers usually tight ends and rbs. They split the alignment of the front row and are off 5 yards.

Works pretty well
"Some athletes have division 1 dreams and jv work ethic" - random

Offline Bob Goodman

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Re: Defending the on-side kick
« Reply #20 on: May 21, 2015, 09:53:51 PM »
Second row is our best catchers usually tight ends and rbs. They split the alignment of the front row and are off 5 yards.
5 yards behind the front row players, or 5 yards behind the front line?

Offline ZACH

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Re: Defending the on-side kick
« Reply #21 on: May 22, 2015, 10:06:35 AM »
5 yards behind first row...if we scout we over shift essentially to something like this. We start I  5-4-2

---------------------------------k
-----1----2---3--4--5-----------5---4---3---2--1

-----t-------g--------g-------g-----------t
-----------------------------------------------------te
-------te------rb-------rb
-wr--------
------------------------------stud
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Offline coachdoug

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Re: Defending the on-side kick
« Reply #22 on: May 24, 2015, 06:29:11 PM »
Bob, great advice!  I have never considered starting behind the restraining line.  Makes perfect sense to me.  Talk about a 'duh' moment.  I'm learning something new every day on this site...
Yeah, I've been aligning my front row on the 48 yard line for years for these very reasons - pretty easy to move forward a couple yards if necessary, but most of the time, being back a little farther gives the front line a better view of and position to make a play on an onside kick.  Of course, on a deep kick it also puts them in a better position to get to their blocks.

I generally run a 6-3-2 at the 14u level, with the front line aligned on the 48, the second line on the 33, and the deep guys on the 18, then we adjust according to scouting report and what we see during the game.