Author Topic: Styles of Pass Protection  (Read 1015 times)

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Online MHcoach

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Styles of Pass Protection
« on: April 19, 2018, 05:40:42 PM »
I am talking about styles of protections rather than schemes for a moment. We clearly identify the styles for each type of pass.

Fast Screen- This is a rip & run where we get up field ASAP. The play side G&T will go flat as if they are pulling on a sweep to keep the DL's hands down.

Quick- Here is where we talk about staying Hard. G's& C can not give ground or the DL will be in the QB's lap. Years back we would cut the inside OL, that has changed to only cut as a last resort. The T's can give ground if they are blocking out, if they are blocking inside they too must stay Hard.

PAP- Make it look like a run. Since we a Zone team we want our OLINE to take their Zone steps.

Boot or Naked- Again sell the run but know where the QB will be.

Drop- Longer protection needed. C & G's can give 1 1/2 yds to 2 yds. T's blocking out can give more ground.

Ok so this is a place to start.

Joe
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Offline GP

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Re: Styles of Pass Protection
« Reply #1 on: April 19, 2018, 10:25:59 PM »
One thing I learned from Herb Hand at a Glazier years ago is that if the O-Line doesn't know the launch point, there is no way you can expect them to protect the QB. Each style dictates the launch point.

For us, we call our passes series like this:

60 = Quicks
70 = Rollouts
80 = PAPs & Dropback
90 = Fast Screens

So if we call "60 Stick," the 60 (or 61) tells our OL it's a Quick Pass (3 Step UTC or 1 Gun) so they know the QB is throwing from pocket and they can't give any ground. Since it's even, OL slides right unless we have an "NFL" tag on. If we want to slide left, we call 61 Stick.

At Youth we block PAPs & Drop Backs the same and let the backs sell the run. If I were coaching HS I would obviously do that differently.

We lump Naked in with our PAP / Drop series but make sure the OL understand what the Q is doing & where he's going when we call Naked. Would also run Naked differently at HS.

One key with this is getting them to realize the word is meaningless to them unless it's Naked, just focus on the #. Every year some lineman looks at the wrist band and asks me what he does on 60 Stick after we've been running 60 Slaro (Slant / Arrow) for weeks. 
« Last Edit: April 19, 2018, 10:28:46 PM by GP »
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Re: Styles of Pass Protection
« Reply #2 on: April 20, 2018, 07:11:02 AM »
When we ran Sprint Passes in the 80's we worked hard on this protection. Step & hinge was the technique, the front side G & T again stayed Hard & the backside gave ground. So the actual technique was to protect the Sprint Side gap & then hinge to the backside. This provided a throwing lane for the QB.

Joe
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Re: Styles of Pass Protection
« Reply #3 on: April 21, 2018, 10:47:11 AM »
I don't understand why guys always complaining about having poor pass protection, then when start discussing different styles no one is interested.

Joe
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Offline chucknduck

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Re: Styles of Pass Protection
« Reply #4 on: April 21, 2018, 12:25:20 PM »
I don't understand why guys always complaining about having poor pass protection, then when start discussing different styles no one is interested.

Joe

Hahaha....OK, here's how I work my protection.

Probably my favorite thing about the spread offense is it makes pass protection much simpler.  You're now dealing with five and six man boxes instead of seven or eight.

I use very large splits and almost always use six man protection.  No sliding, it's man blocking but sometimes turns into zone.  I want the back out as much as possible.

Versus a 4-3, the lineman have four d lineman and the Mike, the back has the olb to his side.  If the olb opposite the back comes there is a built-in hot or sight adjustment. for the qb on every play. Can also have the back check both olbs before releasing.   
The sight adjustment is very simple.  If the slot is running a vertical or a dig, he simple pulls up on a stick route if his man blitzes.  The FS is usually going to be covering him so why run to him?  Just stop and we'll throw you the ball.

Most of our passing game is quick game so he doesn't need to alter those routes.  The qb has been drilled on each play...this is the guy that can get to us, if he blitzes you throw here right now.
If it's a 4-2, the back simply makes a call to the center to let him know which side he's on.  Just gotta rep the hell outta those cross dogs.
Vertical set the line and let the stunts happen in front of you.  And two the hell out of it.
Against a 3-3 stack, we simply have the back take Mike and the guards take the olbs.  Then rep all  the stunts and twists.

I try to be as simple as possible and just rep the the hell outta what we're doing.

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Re: Styles of Pass Protection
« Reply #5 on: April 21, 2018, 12:44:12 PM »
I don't understand why guys always complaining about having poor pass protection, then when start discussing different styles no one is interested.

Joe

We have GREAT pass protection. Sometimes the QB holds on to the ball too long.  :D Either because he screws up or because the play caller screws up. Ball is supposed to be gone in 2 seconds.

Our base is what I call "GAP ON FAN". Inside Gap, then Man on, then Fan out if neither. We ignore blitzers from depth. A walk up becomes a D-lineman and we adjust. If the QB snaps the ball as a LB walks up and the o-line doesn't have time to talk it over and adjust, then the QB deserves what happens next. If we have to let a man or two go, we make sure it's the outside edge rushers. Our splits make it near impossible to get to the QB in 2 seconds. It's not 100% fool proof, but we've given up 2 sacks in 4 seasons. Both were the QB's fault. Once, he decided to roll out and another, he double clutched the ball. Our Week 2 opponent this Spring roughed him up twice after the ball was away. Should have been personal fouls, but the play caller dialled up 8's and 9's with a blitzer from depth.

I have done slide and despite what Mahonz said, it works very well. Our S back (aka TB/HB) directs the line which way to slide and he picks opposite. If we have a TE, he will slide the line away and fill for the TE. If we have a play action pass, he will call the line away from the play action and fill naturally. Line will point to their man and if S sees a 7th rusher, he can call our H back for help. He will call "HAWK EMO!" and point to the H's near rusher. Hawk will move in to a WB position. S will take the opposite edge rusher.

What I'm really trying to drill into the OC's head is to throw into the blitz. We blew an opportunity last week because our opponent's LBs had a "tell". They staggered their feet when they were blitzing. We threw a lot of slants to wide open X receivers, but simply because we were trying to get them involved in the game. Not because we were taking advantage of a hole in their coverage.

Last Fall, our rollout passes were much longer, so we just blocked a reach scheme to the rollout side. With our new side saddle, the rollout is much shorter, so we just went back to fan protection. The biggest issue is that our QB really struggles with throwing on the run. He either over thinks the hand/foot coordination, or doesn't think about it at all. We need to find a happy medium.
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Offline ZACH

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Re: Styles of Pass Protection
« Reply #6 on: April 21, 2018, 02:12:56 PM »
We are mainly slide protection for drop back and pap. We are also normally only sending 3 receivers out. We have 2 calls...slide with rb commin up front side and one backside.  Our slide is " man toward " so 61 is man left, 60 is man right. If man is an lb we spy for rush then go to "man toward" on the los.

Our drop back is 3 step and we have calls that change protection where we put our rb on a specific guy.

Our screen game we count second level players only and we run pass or under los players to get there.

Wr screens we just run wide toward the called receiver and hit people second level.

Its nothing crazy however its worked well for us at 10-14 yr.
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Offline mahonz

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Re: Styles of Pass Protection
« Reply #7 on: April 22, 2018, 01:09:40 PM »
I don't understand why guys always complaining about having poor pass protection, then when start discussing different styles no one is interested.

Joe

This was at my request so my fault.

I was hoping for a little something a bit more Super Smurf friendly. A nugget about sliding....a nugget about hinge...max protections....

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Re: Styles of Pass Protection
« Reply #8 on: April 22, 2018, 02:43:40 PM »
M

No problem, lets get some nuggets out there.

Slide- especially for Smurfs this is the best & easiest protection. You always know that your back is a better athlete than any OT. So having him block an edge defender is golden. The key is to slide to your best OT. One year at the HS level our LT was a freshman & just horrible. We slid away from him all year with good success.

You want the OLine to attack their gap. If they have a man on their head they must punch with the hand opposite of where they are sliding to. If the defender comes to them now they can get the slide side hand involved. If he goes away the punch allows the man next to him to get there. The first step really depends on the individual & how quick they are. If they are a slug now it can almost be a drop step. The important thing is to attack the gap they are sliding to. There is no thinking involved which is great  for Smurfs.

The last thing to teach & reinforce is never block air. If they step to their gap & no one is there, swivel their head & find someone to block.

Hinge- I am assuming for a roll or boot. The key being if I am on the side of the roll I don't give ground.

Max- In my lingo Max Protection is a 9 man protection. Hit Hit Cut!

Joe
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Offline Coach Correa

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Re: Styles of Pass Protection
« Reply #9 on: April 22, 2018, 04:08:06 PM »
We have and aggresive protection which is P.A.P. OR Sprint depending on concept which is hard on the front and hings on the back and its best thing we ever done because we throw effectively and consistently no matter age group. Hinge protection taught the write way kills backside chase weather u use TE OT OG or use your backs as part of it....
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Re: Styles of Pass Protection
« Reply #10 on: April 22, 2018, 04:54:58 PM »
T

Are you pulling both Guards on Waggle?

Joe
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Re: Styles of Pass Protection
« Reply #11 on: April 22, 2018, 07:52:33 PM »
 We pull 1 and hinging on Te Wing Side fullback replaces for guard who's logging. Rb running buck path buck falls into hinge when TE and H release...
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Re: Styles of Pass Protection
« Reply #12 on: April 22, 2018, 07:54:29 PM »
https://youtu.be/_8NQH7QMwj4....... You can see here Coach !!!!
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Re: Styles of Pass Protection
« Reply #13 on: April 22, 2018, 09:37:08 PM »
T

Nice!

Joe
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Re: Styles of Pass Protection
« Reply #14 on: April 23, 2018, 07:58:48 PM »
We use slide protection for our 3 step game for last 2 years. I got this from Joe we use alot more sprint and Play Action but when we do go 3 step it's slide . Take a look tell me what you guy's think... https://youtu.be/iylOmrFymU8
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