Author Topic: Oklahoma Triple Option Offense Playbook  (Read 712 times)

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Offline dietritus

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Oklahoma Triple Option Offense Playbook
« on: March 19, 2014, 09:47:09 PM »
Does anyone have the Oklahoma Triple Option Offense Playbook (184 Pages), willing to share a copy?

Offline CoachJohn

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« Last Edit: March 20, 2014, 08:24:56 PM by CoachJohn »
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Offline dietritus

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Re: Oklahoma Triple Option Offense Playbook
« Reply #2 on: March 20, 2014, 07:14:58 PM »
CoachJohn,
         Thank you very much.

Offline Steve Gunther

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Re: Oklahoma Triple Option Offense Playbook
« Reply #3 on: March 25, 2014, 03:31:16 PM »
Emory Bellard is the Father of the Wishbone

If you can believe it, he taught Barry Switzer and Chuck Fairbanks how to run the Wishbone.  Darrell Royal played for Bud Wilkinson at Oklahoma and was an All-American QB.  When Chuck Fairbanks was about to get fired, he asked Royal to teach him the Offense.  Emory was called into Royal's office and was told they were giving the Wishbone to Oklahoma.  Emory about did a back flip!  Emory was told a young offensive cordinator by the name of Barry Switzer would be calling him.  He said, Barry Switzer called him every weekend the next season.  The only weekend he didn't call is when Texas played Oklahoma.  Emory thought for sure the phone would ring the weekend prior to the game.

Texas gave Oklahoma the Wishbone!  They eventually gave Alabama with Bear Bryant the Wishbone.  Emory was a part of both of those give aways.
« Last Edit: March 25, 2014, 03:33:07 PM by Steve Gunther »
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Offline Michael ODonnell

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Re: Oklahoma Triple Option Offense Playbook
« Reply #4 on: May 15, 2014, 02:46:06 PM »
If you are looking for a tremendous resource, look for "How to Coach the Wishbone Football Offense" by Emory Bellard. Coach Gunther helped compile this information and it would be a marvelous addition to anyone's coaching library.

Excellent job on the book, Coach Gunther. All the best.

Mike O'Donnell
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Offline CoachSahd

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Re: Oklahoma Triple Option Offense Playbook
« Reply #5 on: May 15, 2014, 09:39:36 PM »
If you are looking for a tremendous resource, look for "How to Coach the Wishbone Football Offense" by Emory Bellard. Coach Gunther helped compile this information and it would be a marvelous addition to anyone's coaching library.

Excellent job on the book, Coach Gunther. All the best.

Mike O'Donnell

This ^^^^

WB seeks to attack the outside off the FB play.  If they are giving 5 to 7 yards in the FB keep Pounding!!  I have been taught to account for the 4 defenders closest to the Sideline with the WB.  Watch the Military Academy's play.  Even though its Flex Bone, the concept is similar.  I believe Navy's FB gashed ND for 200 yards. 

JMHO   ;)
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Offline Michael ODonnell

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Re: Oklahoma Triple Option Offense Playbook
« Reply #6 on: May 17, 2014, 05:28:21 PM »
Why don't more teams run the fullhouse wishbone? From what I have seen and coached against, the double slot teams (Navy and Georgia Tech style of offenses) still would rather run the ball 90% of the time. That is what the wishbone teams were doing when Texas, Oklahoma, Alabama, and UCLA were in the offense. The fullhouse WB can feature a tremendous power run game, some solid misdirection, and the option game is first rate. In addition, you can feature multiple blocking schemes on the perimeter as well as inside to further confuse the defense.

Does anyone have any thoughts on this?

On another thought: Are there any outstanding HS teams still running the fullhouse WB as their basic set? Thanks for the help.
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Offline bignose

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Re: Oklahoma Triple Option Offense Playbook
« Reply #7 on: May 18, 2014, 04:02:53 PM »
The transition from the Full House Bone to the "Flexbone" began with Fisher DeBerry at the Air Force Academy towards the end of the 1980s.
He found that the smaller HBs he had were not able to make either the junction/arc block out of the Bone, the run support players began to meet them on the wrong side of the LOS, nor could they load block as effectively. The DE's were pushing them into the backfield. So they moved them up to a slot position to facilitate this.
The tradeoff was the loss of the power attack, but it improved the triple option by making the offense totally symmetrical.
And there was deep passing threat to both sides which didn't exist from the Bone with a single split end, which changed how the secondary could support the run.

We ran the Fullhouse Bone from 1986 thru 2006, albeit not as a triple option offense. Think Power I with the option being like an Isolation option, not a double read. We managed to win 4 Maryland State Championships during this time. Like Air Force, we evolved to a Double Wing Power offense for much the same reason, our running backs and line were smaller than we had in the past.
 
« Last Edit: May 18, 2014, 06:26:42 PM by bignose »
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Offline dietritus

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Re: Oklahoma Triple Option Offense Playbook
« Reply #8 on: May 26, 2014, 02:11:51 AM »
Why don't more teams run the fullhouse wishbone? From what I have seen and coached against, the double slot teams (Navy and Georgia Tech style of offenses) still would rather run the ball 90% of the time. That is what the wishbone teams were doing when Texas, Oklahoma, Alabama, and UCLA were in the offense. The fullhouse WB can feature a tremendous power run game, some solid misdirection, and the option game is first rate. In addition, you can feature multiple blocking schemes on the perimeter as well as inside to further confuse the defense.

Does anyone have any thoughts on this?

On another thought: Are there any outstanding HS teams still running the fullhouse WB as their basic set? Thanks for the help.
Yes, there is? Here in Illinois. Newman Central Catholic.  Here is the link to there championship games:   

2013 game : http://www.nfhsnetwork.com/events/63598
2010 game:  http://www.nfhsnetwork.com/events/13564

Enjoy!

Offline Michael ODonnell

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Re: Oklahoma Triple Option Offense Playbook
« Reply #9 on: May 27, 2014, 04:08:38 PM »
Bignose,

I understand the Air Force Academy's decision to best utilize their smaller HBs as wingbacks (thus the development of the flexbone). What I don't understand though is why everyone went to this look. Many of the wishbone teams (ex. Texas, Oklahoma, Alabama, Texas A&M, UCLA, etc.) stayed primarily in the full house WB and had smaller HBs who could block effectively out of a deeper backfield position. As you are well aware, none of the big 3 (Texas, Oklahoma, or Alabama) had a endless supply of physically large HBs but in their time with the wishbone featured some smaller but extremely quick halfbacks (ex. Chris Gilbert at Texas, Greg Pruitt at Oklahoma, and Linnie Patrick at Alabama to name a few).

In addition, when other wishbone converts had larger, more physical HBs, these teams featured more of a power based running game from the WB (I am thinking of Kentucky in 1975-76 with Derrick Ramsey at QB and Rod Stewart at FB). I just think that teams (primarily HS) who run the full house WB as it was initially designed and employed by Texas could have a huge advantage much like the teams who currently run the single wing. Because you don't see the offense that much, if at all, your defensive preparation time during the week can become overloaded just trying to stop the basic attack.
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Offline bignose

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Re: Oklahoma Triple Option Offense Playbook
« Reply #10 on: May 27, 2014, 05:06:09 PM »
I think that the change away from the Bone as a dominant college offense had as much to do with recruiting and public perception (that affects recruiting) from the "powerhouse" teams.

It is hard to to attract kids to "Enormous State University" to run an offense that isn't used "at the next level", and this, in turn, is a big deal to a coach who's mortgage depends on the win loss record.
When the blue chippers go somewhere else, it's a problem. Try explaining that to the alumni and administration…..you know how that's gonna end up.

The QB position, in particular was hard to fill.
Now, we have come full circle and the option read with the QB as a part of the running attack is widely used again.

The "triple option veer theory" is still sound. It seems to be more effective currently from the Double Slot Flexbone, although other schemes like the I Bone were developed to try to have the best of both worlds. Certainly, the various options run from the Spread show a lot of diversity with the option style attacks.

Air Force is certainly much more multiple these days, but at what cost? I do not think that their execution is anywhere near as good as it used to be.

The more compressed Wishbone is still a valid offense. Much like the Wing T and Single Wing, it has stood the test of time. When I reread the Pepper Rodgers-Homer Smith manual, those plays are still sound.

Have defenses gotten better at stopping the base Triple Option?
Possibly, but by widening the formation, we have essentially turned this into a game of "Ultimate Red Rover".
« Last Edit: May 27, 2014, 06:08:46 PM by bignose »
"Football may be the best subject taught in American High Schools because it is the only subject that we haven't tried to make easy."
Dorothy Farnan
former English Department Chairman
Erasmus Hall high School
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Offline Michael ODonnell

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Re: Oklahoma Triple Option Offense Playbook
« Reply #11 on: May 27, 2014, 06:29:08 PM »
Bignose,

As always, you make a number of great points/observations. I would agree completely that the WB at the major college level may well be extinct because of a coach's inability to get blue-chip performers at either running back or QB. In the Oklahoma playbook, the QB requirements were the following:

1. A running back who can throw
2. Must be tough, disciplined and durable - cannot miss practice
3. Option aptitude
4. Outstanding athletic ability
5. Should be creative - Turn the negative or unexpected into a positive "make something happen"
6. Be a leader - Team should root for him
7. Total football player

That certainly sums up what the Sooners were looking for in a QB. Mildren, Robertson, Lott, Thompson, Holieway, and Davis (among others) were outstanding runners who could throw the ball when needed. They ran the show and, without a doubt, they were creative leaders.

Texas and Alabama along with UCLA would say much the same about their QBs who were in the wishbone. Texas may be did the best job in terms of having not a stellar person but someone who could lead and execute flawlessly the triple option attack. Coach Royal and his coaches were masterful at finding the right person in high schools and making them a solid performer for the Longhorns.
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Offline CoachSahd

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Re: Oklahoma Triple Option Offense Playbook
« Reply #12 on: May 28, 2014, 04:17:13 PM »
Mike Lalor at Stillman Valley ran the Wishbone and now runs the Flexbone.  I think Mike has Coached in 5 Title games. 
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Offline dietritus

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Re: Oklahoma Triple Option Offense Playbook
« Reply #13 on: May 30, 2014, 06:37:18 PM »
CoachShad,
    Your correct.  I attended the state championship games at NIU last year. Beside that it was cold , was an awesome day for football.  In the Stillman Valley game, the flex bone was not clicking.  St. Joe-Ogden had the flex bone in check.   Coach Lalor went to the wishbone and  that's what fueled the come from behind victory.  On the Newman Catholic link above, you can fine Stillman Valley game.

Offline CoachSahd

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Re: Oklahoma Triple Option Offense Playbook
« Reply #14 on: May 31, 2014, 01:57:45 AM »
CoachShad,
    Your correct.  I attended the state championship games at NIU last year. Beside that it was cold , was an awesome day for football.  In the Stillman Valley game, the flex bone was not clicking.  St. Joe-Ogden had the flex bone in check.   Coach Lalor went to the wishbone and  that's what fueled the come from behind victory.  On the Newman Catholic link above, you can fine Stillman Valley game.

I have met with, listened to, and emailed Mike.  He is a stand up guy. I have several of his inexpensive DVD's.  He knows how to adjust his offense to meet the defense. 
Show me a man who has never failed and I'll show you someone who has never tried.