Author Topic: Third Grade Pro Style  (Read 6194 times)

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Offline CoachOCD

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Re: Third Grade Pro Style
« Reply #15 on: January 13, 2015, 06:03:04 PM »
OK so your talking 9 - 10 year olds mostly on your team? SWEEP! both under and over the DE, much like a toss sweep then hit the toss pass and your backside TE will be wide open at this age level. The out routes were harder for us to hit than the simple seam routes at this age level. But the pitch n pass the toss pass that looks just like your outside perimeter run, right up until the running back pulls up stops and chucks it...was usually at a wide open receiver. For us that wide open receiver was the backside TE who I had run up a few steps then cut to far side corner of field...call it a crossing pattern or a corner route or flag route whatever your nomenclature is that safety would bite on the toss dang near every time and nobody was home to cover it!!

By the way Clarks DCWT calls this the #3 route and its more of a deep slant with the QB rolling out not the toss or pitch pass I added to it

I gotta say when kids see that ball go in air on the toss/pitch its like a bug zapper! They have to get to the light...like I mentioned before this includes the safety 9 times outta 10...10 outta 10 if you set it up with a few tosses

Im not posting this saying its an easy install Im posting saying the pass has a very high completion percentage and by design to a wide open reciever

just sayin my 2 cents

OCD

Offline Coacher

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Re: Third Grade Pro Style
« Reply #16 on: January 15, 2015, 07:33:39 PM »
OK so your talking 9 - 10 year olds mostly on your team? SWEEP! both under and over the DE, much like a toss sweep then hit the toss pass and your backside TE will be wide open at this age level. The out routes were harder for us to hit than the simple seam routes at this age level. But the pitch n pass the toss pass that looks just like your outside perimeter run, right up until the running back pulls up stops and chucks it...was usually at a wide open receiver. For us that wide open receiver was the backside TE who I had run up a few steps then cut to far side corner of field...call it a crossing pattern or a corner route or flag route whatever your nomenclature is that safety would bite on the toss dang near every time and nobody was home to cover it!!

By the way Clarks DCWT calls this the #3 route and its more of a deep slant with the QB rolling out not the toss or pitch pass I added to it

I gotta say when kids see that ball go in air on the toss/pitch its like a bug zapper! They have to get to the light...like I mentioned before this includes the safety 9 times outta 10...10 outta 10 if you set it up with a few tosses

Im not posting this saying its an easy install Im posting saying the pass has a very high completion percentage and by design to a wide open reciever

just sayin my 2 cents

OCD

So the base is a toss with toss pass. Care to share other system info? Were you double tight? What kind of blocking did you use up front? What was the backfield alignment and backfield action? Thanks for sharing!!!

Offline CoachOCD

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Re: Third Grade Pro Style
« Reply #17 on: January 16, 2015, 02:32:02 PM »
for the purpose of my intended message the formation is irrelevant. My intention was to give you a pass play that featured a wide open receiver because the defense would of been conditioned to the run game not to mention seeing the ball tossed in air just is just plain awesome vs youth defenses...they all come a runnin!

The 2ndary item of importance, in ye ole toss pass play, is throwing to backside TE. This is because he is closer to the other side of field and can therefor threaten that side as a receiver, the same cannot be said for a wideout receiver. Often youth defenses will loose the TE ESPECIALLY in a PAP play, leaving him uncovered for at least a few seconds. He can run a drag/crossing pattern or corner route whatever you want to call it its up and then over. The safety will either come up to stop the run play (most common response) or he will try to cover the receiver running to his area, namely your TE.

IF S does go to cover your TE then simply take what the D is giving you.

you could have the play side receiver or split end go to block his corner, as soon as the corner tries to get away from your block, continue down field, shuffling running backwards, doing jumping jacks it dont matter yu have nobody around you to cover you...raise your hands show the passer your numbers...catch lob pass might even be a shotput heck he could rugby punt you a pass at this point THERE IS LITERALLY NOBODY NEAR THE RECEIVER!

nOW i KNOW SOME COACHES WILL SAY (opps caps on) something like yah well my corner wouldnt release your reciever like that...response then is the pitch back that takes toss or pitch from QB would then keep ball, the receiver would run off the corner...better yet you could DCWT that reciever and have him go block the safety....now the corner and safety are out of play with 1 kid

like I was saying its easy, or it can be, but its can become more complex, the reason is whatever the defense does to stop it you have an answer and thusly you force them into conflict of assignments

and if they ever do cover all this have your QB toss ball and then stand there for the throw back screen or roll out backside for throwback if your HB has a good enough arm...there really is a lot that can be done with the toss pass

Offline Bob Goodman

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Re: Third Grade Pro Style
« Reply #18 on: January 16, 2015, 04:32:42 PM »
If you actually initiate contact downfield with a DB (and it's clear you initiated it, it wasn't bump & run coverage), then a subsequent pass to the same or another receiver downfield makes the contact illegal.  Of course with the few officials usually watching for that sort of thing in youth football, you may well get away with it.

Offline CoachOCD

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Re: Third Grade Pro Style
« Reply #19 on: January 16, 2015, 04:51:26 PM »
run up stalk block and go when he releases haven't been called on yet!

Offline ZACH

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Re: Third Grade Pro Style
« Reply #20 on: January 16, 2015, 07:51:38 PM »
I guess our rules differ in PA...the piaa sanction allows contact within 5 yards and until the ball is in the air.

If you 3 step you can essentially not let him release...if longer you can still not let him release until the ball becomes airborne.

Least thats the way I interpret the rule and seen it enforced. Rich would know more im sure.
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Offline Bob Goodman

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Re: Third Grade Pro Style
« Reply #21 on: January 16, 2015, 10:59:34 PM »
I guess our rules differ in PA...the piaa sanction allows contact within 5 yards and until the ball is in the air.

If you 3 step you can essentially not let him release...if longer you can still not let him release until the ball becomes airborne.

Least thats the way I interpret the rule and seen it enforced. Rich would know more im sure.
The PIAA uses Fed rules for football, so if they're allowing receivers to make contact as much as 5 yds. downfield and still have passes to them or their teammates there, something is funny.  That's the point of it: that if the defense sees you blocking downfield, they're supposed to be confident they won't have to defend passes there on that play.