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Are you familiar with JJ Lawson's 33 stack? He has a "Grim" and "Guts" call that could fit this scenario:

   C                                                C
                      r           r

          d      t    g   N    g   t      d
                E  T  G  C  G  T  E

N - Nose guard. Head up on the C. Must be able to post the C and play both gaps.

g - Defensive Guards - b gaps

t - Defensive Tackles - c gaps

d - Dogs - 3 yards off the TE or ghost TE. Run at: play upfield to the near deep back to force sweeps, but must be able to read on the fly and squeeze down on the TE for edge runs. Run away: get to the depth of the deepest back and jog, looking for bootleg/counter/revers. Pass: If you see the QB's back, go get some. If you see his face, drop into the flat, 3 yards either side of the ball.

R: play 7 yards deep and left to right, split the difference between the N and the near dog. At the snap, run aggressively forward and make your read in the first 2 steps. QB hands up = pass. QB hands down = run. Run at: take a good angle to the far edge of the ball carrier (outside in). Run away:  take a good angle to the near edge of the ball carrier (inside out). Find ball, kill ball. Pass: back pedal and rob the short middle zone, eyes on QB.

C: play 10 yards deep, outside shade of the #1 receiver. Run aggressively forward and make your read in the first two steps. If #1 shows vertical, peek at the QB. Hands up = pass, Hands down = run.  If pass and there's a vertical threat, back pedal until the vert is within 5 yards of you, then turn your hips and run with him. If no vertical threat, eyes on QB and play the ball. Run at: pick an angle that gets you 2 yards outside the ball carrier's outside edge and NEVER give up outside leverage. Force him inside, force him out of bounds, or make the tackle, but NEVER give up outside leverage. Run away: Chill until you see the ball cross the LOS, then pick a good angle and save a TD.
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General Defense Discussion / Re: Trash
« Last post by gumby_in_co on Today at 02:54:15 PM »
Assuming this was pre-game, I probably would have walked as soon as the refs refused to honor the 11 year old weight rules.

I have only pulled one team from a game. It was a hockey game and to this day, I say had a good reason to pull them. We were a 9-10 year old team playing in the 11-12 division in a tournament. I pulled my team after the 2nd fistfight that resulted in matching 2 minute roughing penalties. I, the opposing coach and the refs had lost control of the game. However, in nearly 15 years of coaching multiple sports, I have very few regrets. Pulling my team is one of them.
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General Offense Discussion / Re: O linemen games?
« Last post by tiger46 on Today at 02:52:45 PM »
I realize that I'm late to the thread.  But, here are a couple of things that we do with our O-line.

1. In games, we have a 'roller-skates' competition on who can drive their opponent back the farthest before the ref blows his whistle.  If the O-lineman gets a pancake we add +5 yards to the total distance.  The record for total yards is 18yrds. 13yrds +5yrds for the pancake.  The best roller-skate was 15yrds. But, there was no pancake at the end or, that lineman would have the best total yards.  There are plenty of close seconds.

2. During O-line practice when we go half-line or full-line, I use the worse player on the team as the RB.  This season we have a tiny player that is slow, timid and knows nothing about football.  He doesn't even know the holes.  His plays are run to <Lineman's name> left leg or, to the right leg.  It is a real workout for our O-line to get him any yards, at all.  The O-line has to drive harder, sustain blocks longer and, get really vicious about moving their football forward.  If the RB gets less than 3yrds, the O-line does up-downs.

Bonus is that the player is a lot less timid and less afraid of contact than he was before.  He now plays on my special teams.  He may not be much of a football player.  But, he is developing the heart of a lion!
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Your Game Results / Re: 2017 Season begins
« Last post by mahonz on Today at 02:45:48 PM »
Makes sense on paper. Doesn't work on grass. The key to wedge blocking having 6 guys pushing on 1 guy. That one guy is NOT a defender, BTW, he's the "apex". Apex goes down, wedge stops and if it's blocked properly, the ball carrier is trapped by his own guys. I wasn't sure what Mahonz' game plan to stop the wedge was. I was hunting all week and missed practice. I went back to watch film and he was cutting the apex. Very "un-Mahonz", but it worked. We had to rotate 4 guys at this position and I'm sure they were all relieved when the other team abandoned the wedge.

As DP pointed out, guys who run wedge are thrilled when opposing coaches dismiss it as "not real football". It means the offense will have a big day and you'll most likely win the game.

Brian convinced me to cut with one....compress with three. I agreed as long as he gave me the DE's I wanted. My concern was did we have the ass to do this....Brian was right.
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Your Game Results / Re: 2017 Season begins
« Last post by gumby_in_co on Today at 02:38:57 PM »
What stood out was the D-tackles could have been the way to beat this team, the wedge pushed right up the middle in most cases and if the tackles collapsed right behind it, they would be in position to make the play in most instances.  Does that make sense?


Makes sense on paper. Doesn't work on grass. The key to wedge blocking having 6 guys pushing on 1 guy. That one guy is NOT a defender, BTW, he's the "apex". Apex goes down, wedge stops and if it's blocked properly, the ball carrier is trapped by his own guys. I wasn't sure what Mahonz' game plan to stop the wedge was. I was hunting all week and missed practice. I went back to watch film and he was cutting the apex. Very "un-Mahonz", but it worked. We had to rotate 4 guys at this position and I'm sure they were all relieved when the other team abandoned the wedge.

As DP pointed out, guys who run wedge are thrilled when opposing coaches dismiss it as "not real football". It means the offense will have a big day and you'll most likely win the game.
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If i was to put a number on it, I would say 60% pass 40% run.

The issue with majoring in the run with the spread is when they defense loads the box and goes fire zone or cover 0 on you, you better have an answer on the outside.

Due to the plethora of run first offenses in my league, we mostly see 6-7 man boxes; therefore they are only leaving 4 or 5 guys in coverage.
Even the "in-vogue" 4-2-5 teams don't give up the 6 man box here.

Our answer for that this year was to "major" in the pass and really work on the o-line's pass blocking technique as well as the receiver's ability to get open vs man.
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General Discussion / Re: Finish this: I love it when...
« Last post by gumby_in_co on Today at 02:29:48 PM »
Wait, is this sarcastic or sincere?

Sarcastic: I love it when officials don't bother to learn the rules.

Sincere: I love it when a "single tasker" has a great game.
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General Discussion / Re: Question for offensive line coaches
« Last post by gumby_in_co on Today at 02:27:03 PM »
The first time I was introduced to the idea of platooning, I was opposed to it for the same reasons. Now, I prefer it. Some of our guys are not "coached" on one side of the ball, but they get plenty of reps in scout. For example, our starting MLB might get reps at TE while his backup gets work.

As far as developing them? Last week, we put our starting CB in at RB due to an injury. He just started getting reps at wideout a few weeks ago. Prior to that, he hardly ever played offense.  In certain situations, our RB is called on to kick out the EMLOS. Our main kickout blocker took about a month to really get it down. His backup is still learning it and struggling despite blocking out of the backfield for a couple of years. Our CB stepped in and I realized he's never been taught to kick out. Just as I was about to hit the "pause" button to coach him up, he executed the best kick out block I've ever seen.
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General Offense Discussion / Re: One thought about running No Play
« Last post by somecoach on Today at 02:24:36 PM »
I am a huge fan of it for the "check with me".
Where I can see what the defense lines up in and then check to the best play.
and the occasional offsides is just a bonus

... but to waste a time out everytime you call it is just stupid
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General Offense Discussion / Re: One thought about running No Play
« Last post by CoachMattC on Today at 02:20:43 PM »
We used to use it if we were already going to burn a timeout for some other reason and seconds weren't critical. In those situations we always had some sort of motion tagged to help sell it. Jet Freeze worked really well for us.

Then of course, if they're expecting it and their coaches are yelling at them to watch the ball the best call we had back in the single wing days was wedge on first sound. Talk about putting the d-line on their heels.
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