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Author Topic: Improving second level blocking  (Read 1395 times)

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Offline coachmiket

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Re: Improving second level blocking
« Reply #15 on: October 03, 2018, 04:30:29 PM »
I posted this thought process in another thread. 

Run a scrimmage (half line, full squad, whatever).  First side to 7 or whatever wins.  Losers have a quick punishment.  Only award points for the Offense or Defense doing something specific that you want to improve or emphasize.  In this case, you would award points for OL correctly getting to their second level blocks with the desired technique.  And of course you're going to have the instance where a player misses a primary block because he wants to "play the drill" and get the point for the second level block.  You just have to monitor that and make sure you don't award a point and quickly explain why it wasn't done the proper way it needs to be done.  In most cases you want to add another scoring element so that players aren't cheating the drill (ex: defenders playing unsound just to avoid second level blocks or something like that).  I'm not a good football mind, but I'm sure someone here can think of something. Added benefit of this drill is it should also make your LB work harder to defeat blocks.

As an example of a second scoring element, something I do with my basketball teams: offense gets a point for getting the ball into the paint. But they also get a point for then passing the ball out to a shooter for a 3 pointer (shot must hit the rim).  This helps make sure the defense doesn't cheat things by just packing things inside and not allowing the ball into the paint.  Now they must also stay honest because they have to defend the outside shot as well.

This can be done with tons of points of emphasis that you want your team to get better at and it builds the good habits into your players. 

Offline flosman

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Re: Improving second level blocking
« Reply #16 on: October 04, 2018, 02:55:07 AM »
Over the years the most important teaching point for my linemen is run your track. The next most important thing to teach is to the ball guys and that is strike match. It probably sounds like an oversimplification but it is the two most important teaching points to get oliNE men blocking at the second level and beyond. Once they learn this hand/foot placement, finishing all are easy to teach, imho.

Offline bayoubengal

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Re: Improving second level blocking
« Reply #17 on: October 04, 2018, 10:30:21 AM »
Can you elaborate on that a little?

they are trying to look up the defenders nose.....cant do that standing straight up so they have to load the hips to get low.

Offline Bob Goodman

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Re: Improving second level blocking
« Reply #18 on: October 05, 2018, 11:02:29 AM »
blockandtackle made good points upthread.  A lot of getting good 2nd level blocking is about scheme.

This season I've noticed our opponents are getting "hats" on our LBs better than we are on theirs.  I've mostly been scouting our opponents in games, but last night in a scrimmage I saw our problem: our LBs are sitting ducks.  As I wrote in another thread, early in the season we weren't getting our ILBs to fill, but then HC Dan worked on it.  But it worked only for a while, and the problem's back, because apparently it's one of those things that take continuous work.  If your LBs stand still, having OL block them changes from a hard assignment to an easy one.

If your opponent's LBs play badly that way, that's one thing, but what if they don't?  The next best thing is for your offense to induce flat-footedness on the part of opposing LBs & Ss.  If you can baffle the LBs, you can set them up well enough to be blocked.

Offline CoachDP

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Re: Improving second level blocking
« Reply #19 on: October 16, 2018, 11:06:54 AM »
If your LBs stand still, having OL block them changes from a hard assignment to an easy one.

If anyone on the defense is standing still, then yes blocking them is an easy assignment.  Bob, please don't tell me that's something you had to figure out.  :'(

--Dave
"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement:
"I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go." #BattleReady newhope

Offline Bob Goodman

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Re: Improving second level blocking
« Reply #20 on: October 17, 2018, 01:39:49 PM »
If anyone on the defense is standing still, then yes blocking them is an easy assignment.  Bob, please don't tell me that's something you had to figure out.  :'(
No, but it's something I had to see was available.

I'll draw up plays to release OL against LB, but then say, sure, it'd work if he stood there, but he's not going to be there when the blocker gets there.  There are coaches who say at this level getting an OL to connect on a LB in space is so hard as to not be worth assigning it.

Then I see in our games, not only our own, but opponents' ILBs standing still on plays straight at them, & realize this is not a hard block at all -- yet our blockers don't connect nearly as often as they might.

I'm also thinking about all the misdirection designed to freeze LBs, & see that in many of these games, even against opponents who are beating us, it's unnecessary -- the LBs freeze themselves!  Last game we hardly ran any counters, because the LBs weren't flowing.

Offline CoachDP

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Re: Improving second level blocking
« Reply #21 on: October 17, 2018, 04:14:36 PM »
There are coaches who say at this level getting an OL to connect on a LB in space is so hard as to not be worth assigning it.

That would be me.  Because if your linemen (your worst players) are good enough to block my Linebackers (my best players), then I'm not going to win anyway.  But which youth team has Linemen who are better than an opponent's Linebackers?

And if an opponent's Linebackers simply aren't moving then that's bad coaching, and I'm not going to worry about scheming against a poorly-coached team.

--Dave
"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement:
"I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go." #BattleReady newhope

Offline Bob Goodman

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Re: Improving second level blocking
« Reply #22 on: October 17, 2018, 07:59:01 PM »
That would be me.  Because if your linemen (your worst players) are good enough to block my Linebackers (my best players), then I'm not going to win anyway.  But which youth team has Linemen who are better than an opponent's Linebackers?

And if an opponent's Linebackers simply aren't moving then that's bad coaching, and I'm not going to worry about scheming against a poorly-coached team.

--Dave
But most of us aren't playing against your team!