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Author Topic: Lurker making the leap  (Read 5198 times)

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Offline user007

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Re: Lurker making the leap
« Reply #30 on: December 22, 2016, 06:27:17 AM »
They're not going to get quizzed on it, you f___ing moron.  It's a courtesy.
parents don't give a fck! don't kid yourself. Otherwise they would be coaching.
« Last Edit: December 22, 2016, 06:29:05 AM by user007 »
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Offline CoachMattC

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Re: Lurker making the leap
« Reply #31 on: December 22, 2016, 07:38:56 AM »
Welcome Matt. Glad to have you out of the shadows and into the discussion.

I know it's already been said, but once you have a rough idea what you want your team to look like, I would recommend you start drafting practice plans.

What I used to do was think about where you need to be in terms of installs and fundamentals by the first game. Lets say for discussion you decide you need five blocking schemes, two formations, three backfield actions, one defensive front, one coverage, one blitz, and all six special teams. Fairly bare bones stuff by any standard and that adds up to 20 teaching sessions.

Now look at how many practices you have before the first game and break each one up into 20 minute blocks. Then use each block to account for one of your install periods. Going through this exercise will help you realize five things:

  • You have nowhere near enough time to get all the things done that you started off saying must be done before the first game. Time is in very short supply in youth football. It has to be managed wisely from the beginning or things will be hard for you.
  • This is why so many guys on here talk about getting rid of wasteful stretching, laps, and long winded motivational talks from coaches. You just don't have time for that stuff.
  • You absolutely must accomplish more than one thing in the same time block in order to be successful with your plan. Since you can only be in one place, this means you absolutely have to coach up at least one or two assistants who can get things done without your supervision.
  • Once you see that you have to be able to walk and chew bubblegum at the same time, you'll realize you can't just do any two things in the same period. If Johnny is your QB and also your MLB, you can't schedule installing defensive fronts at the same time you're working on backfield actions. Not to mention you have to make sure the coach who is doing whatever you're not doing knows the session across the field.
  • Just about the time you get all this coordinated you'll realize you only have about 30% of your time left to teach fundamentals. This is why guys will talk about limiting the playbook. If you are truly committed to being excellent at blocking, tackling, and aggression, that stuff takes time.

Hopefully this is helpful and not preachy. There are a hundred other hard learned lessons you will get from folks on here but IMO a lot of it flows from being organized and carrying out a plan across the season.
« Last Edit: December 22, 2016, 07:43:20 AM by CoachMattC »
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Offline CoachCalande

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Re: Lurker making the leap
« Reply #32 on: December 22, 2016, 08:52:54 AM »
Playbooks.....eh....chalk it, talk it, walk it, run it, rep it....no book needed.
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Offline CoachDP

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Re: Lurker making the leap
« Reply #33 on: December 22, 2016, 09:20:37 AM »
I am not going to be the "you didn't study the playbook!" coach.. But I do feel like there are a lot of players that can/need to catch up to where the age group is/probably should  be.

--Do what you want.  If you're more comfortable giving out a playbook, then go ahead.  I've had a playbook for everything I've run.  I just didn't give it out to the players.  No need for me to as I was going to teach it all on the field.  As for there being players that "can/need to catch up to where the age group is," I dunno what that means.  Or how a playbook accomplishes that.

Knowing why the block your making counts is something that needs to be passed on to as many kids as possible.

--Yes.  Agree.  Absolutely.  If you can get that one thing across to your offensive players, you'll already be ahead of 50% of the other teams out there.

I know a lot of parents will have questions

--They will have less questions if you have a Parents Meeting.

I see a bunch of smart kids that everyone thinks are dumb because they don't know how to explain things.

--Welcome to the world of coaching.  That happens at every level. 

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Offline CoachDP

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Re: Lurker making the leap
« Reply #34 on: December 22, 2016, 09:25:12 AM »
If you emphasize everything, you emphasize nothing.

^ This is not Michael being clever.  This is Michael offering great advice. If you put a spotlight on everything at once, you no longer have a spotlight.

--Dave
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Offline CoachDP

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Re: Lurker making the leap
« Reply #35 on: December 22, 2016, 09:33:22 AM »
Playbooks.....eh....chalk it, talk it, walk it, run it, rep it....no book needed.

Agreed.

In teaching a scheme:

You have to know your scheme. Forwards and backwards.

You have to be able to talk it, chalk it and walk it, without thinking

You must be able to whiteboard it against an even and an odd front. Every player must have an assignment.  Otherwise, it’s not a real scheme.  Don’t make it up.

You have to be able to teach fast.  You can’t be trying to figure out what comes next.  You have to already know.  That comes from knowing your scheme well.

You have to keep it simple enough to understand, but complex and thorough enough so that it’s a real scheme that you can make adjustments to.  If it’s something you’ve “made up,” you’re probably not going to have adjustments that you can make.

--Dave
"If You Want To Have Better Players, Be A Better Coach."

The Mission Statement:
"I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

Offline CoachDP

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Re: Lurker making the leap
« Reply #36 on: December 22, 2016, 09:40:46 AM »
Down blocking, part blocking, trap blocking, double teams, pulling and kick-outs are parts of real blocking schemes.  A coach teaches a real blocking scheme.  A parent yells “block somebody.”  “Block somebody” is a directive given that tells the player it doesn’t matter WHO you block, just block “somebody.”  Blocking the wrong man can be just as ineffective as not blocking anyone and is usually what I see on Saturdays:  Players ARE blocking somebody.  They just aren’t blocking the right defender and the play doesn’t work.

Don't teach ANYTHING without knowing the reason you're teaching it.  Know what you teach.  Have a reason for your stance: 2-point, 3-point, 4-point?  Staggered or balanced?  When players (and parents, or coaches on your staff) ask you "Why are we doing this?" you have to know why.  And telling them, "This is the way we've always done it" or "This is the way I did it in high school" shows that you don't know the reason.

--Dave
"If You Want To Have Better Players, Be A Better Coach."

The Mission Statement:
"I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

Offline CoachDP

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Re: Lurker making the leap
« Reply #37 on: December 22, 2016, 09:55:51 AM »
You should know how long your install is going to take.  Otherwise you have no idea how to plan your pre-season practice.  Jack Gregory once told me that I could count on it taking three years to really know the Double Wing.  It took me longer.  (I'm no Jack Gregory.)  So when coaches say they're considering a multitude of schemes while they assess their personnel, I have to wonder...  I've seen countless coaches (I have more than 20 seasons under my belt) have all these "whiteboard plans" in the off-season about what they were going to do.  They'd X and O on paper to me, extolling the virtues of their playbook insight.  Then when the season came around, they were back to running an I-formation with base blocking.  They didn't know their scheme.  And if they did know it, they didn't know how to teach it.  And when it got shut down during the season, they didn't know how to troubleshoot it.  To them, it simply "didn't work."

A few years back, we had a youth coach in our org who was going to run Spread with zone concepts.  He struggled (to put it nicely) with it.  I called Joe about it and put him in touch with the coach.  Afterwards, I spoke with Joe and Joe told me that the coach knew nothing about zone concepts.  When you choose a scheme, I suggest you get in contact with someone else who also runs it and compare notes.  Talking to someone who has already successfully installed and run "your" scheme can save you a lot of headaches.

--Dave
"If You Want To Have Better Players, Be A Better Coach."

The Mission Statement:
"I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

Offline Monster

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Re: Lurker making the leap
« Reply #38 on: December 22, 2016, 10:38:30 AM »
To add:

1. Schedule / plan out your practices and be as realistic as you can be. No battle plan survives the first volley but you want to have as good a hold on how long you're willing to spend on things as you are able.

For me, I schedule out my first practice, my first padded practice, my first week of full contact practice, and my first game week practice.

It can be as specific as you want but this helps me do a few things:

a. Gives me a framework on how to set expectations and consequences at the very beginning. The biggest thing as a coach is that you have to build trust. The players need to know that they can trust you to do what you say.

b. Allows for evaluating talent. Who can throw? Who can catch? Who is aggressive? Who is agile?

c. Sets me up for what I want to emphasize. "What did I put first? Is it really that important? Should I do more of this and less of that?" Those things are critical. If it's important to how you want to run your team, how much time you allot for it will show that.

d. Most importantly, this has allowed me to see where my gaps are in my practice plan. If there's a great big hole between "warmups" and "End of Practice" then you may want to get some meat on that bone.


2. If you are choosing an offense, and what coach ain't gonna choose an offense?, then start with the blocking scheme as stated many, many times above. Running the ball is as simple as "go where the bad guys ain't" and passing is just as simple. But blocking is how you start. Figure out how you want to block a garden variety play and then go from there. There's lots and lots of offenses out there that will give you all you need to accomplish this but start here. Do you want to overpower them? Do you want to spread them out and single up on them?

Once you know how you want to block, then get to work on learning how to coach it. How do you get the players to identify who to block and then what to do once the play starts.


3. Nothing, not any scheme, not any play, not any drill trumps physicality in my opinion. The first "hit" of the game can often set a tone for the whole day. There are lots of examples on how to build, develop and maintain physicality on this website but there is none better than CoachDP above. DM him, get his phone number and set up a time to call. Players can be taught toughness and physicality and aggression. You just have to be willing to pay the cost of teaching them.


4. Come back here early and often and ask questions. If there's a gap in your knowledge, don't let it exist! See a gap, fill a gap. Don't allow yourself to become stagnant or complacent with a less than perfect practice plan. Once you do that, I've found that it helps me to demand (and 'demand' ain't a word but more on that later) performance up to expectations from the players.


5. Lastly, 'Demand' ain't a word. It's your actions. You can go around telling players that you 'demand' perfection from them but how do you get it? Do you allow a player to provide an effort that's not up to your standards? If they do, how do you correct it? What actions are you going to do to get your players to live up to your expectations? How will you help them get there? People will rise to the level of expectations, but they will do so to the real ones, not some words that you say at the end of practice. Have standards, enforce them. Praise the ones that meet them and demand that the ones that don't keep working until they get there.


Hope this helps.
Beware the fury of a patient man.

Offline MHcoach

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Re: Lurker making the leap
« Reply #39 on: December 22, 2016, 04:33:59 PM »
Matt

First of all, welcome; you find it's a two way street here as we all learn from each other.

There has been some excellent advice already sent your way, I am merely hoping to add to things.

Playbooks are for coaches. That is simply the long & short of it. Reason why not to give one to your players have already been answered, but in over 41 years of coaching I have never see giving players playbooks to be a good thing. If you change something the first thing you hear is "that's not in the playbook". If you add something, same response. A football team is a living breathing entity, by not handing out playbooks you allow to develop at it's own pace.

Next, you will hear this a lot here. Coach what you know. In the case that you nothing or very little, then decide to learn something. Scheme isn't really an important issue. Teaching solid blocking & tackling is. There are many here that can help.

Joe
 
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Offline Michael

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Re: Lurker making the leap
« Reply #40 on: December 22, 2016, 05:37:07 PM »
It's amazing how many coaches don't believe learning how to teach blocking is important, and don't believe taking time to teach blocking is important, but are damn sure their triple reverse would have scored instead of losing eight yards if anyone had blocked worth a damn.  And then think maybe a quadruple reverse might do the trick.

And it's amazing how many coaches don't believe learning how to teach tackling is important, and don't believe taking time to teach tackling is important, but are damn sure their double-A gap blitz would have worked like a charm instead of allowing six if any of the four kids who got in would have tackled that dude once they got a hand on him.  And then think maybe bringing a third blitzer might do the trick.
« Last Edit: December 23, 2016, 01:56:27 AM by Michael »
“If you can't explain it to a six-year-old, you don't understand it yourself.” ― Albert Einstein

Offline Dusty Ol Fart

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Re: Lurker making the leap
« Reply #41 on: December 22, 2016, 09:44:00 PM »
It's amazing how many coaches don't believe learning how to teach blocking is important, and don't believe taking time to teach blocking is important, but are damn sure their triple reverse would have scored instead of losing eight yards if anyone had blocked worth a damn.  And then think maybe a quadruple reverse might do the trick.

And it's amazing how many coaches don't believe learning how to teach tackling is important, and don't believe taking time to teach tackling is important, but are damn sure their double-A gap blitz would have worked like a charm instead of allowing six if any of the four kids who got in would have tackled that dude once the got a hand on him.  And then think maybe bringing a third blitzer might do the trick.

to quote Marv Albert "Yes! And it Counts!"    Its called Fundi's!  Drill Blocking and Tackling!  Get the best you can be, and do more! Success will follow!   

Caveat.  Accept slop, get slop!  To ALL new Coaches!  Do everything you can to learn to teach Blocking and Tackling!   Did I mention Blocking and Tackling?   Great Post Michael! 
Not MPP... ONE TASK!  Teach them!  :)

Offline COACH JC

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Re: Lurker making the leap
« Reply #42 on: December 23, 2016, 12:56:36 AM »
I honestly had no idea so many were anti playbook.
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Offline CoachDP

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Re: Lurker making the leap
« Reply #43 on: December 23, 2016, 09:22:42 AM »
I honestly had no idea so many were anti playbook.

I'm not anti-playbook.  I'm against distributing them.

--Dave
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Offline MHcoach

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Re: Lurker making the leap
« Reply #44 on: December 23, 2016, 09:38:26 AM »
J

That is a learned behavior. When I was a young HC, I went against the advice of my mentors I worked tireless to draw a playbook by hand(there was no PC's back then). I handed them out to my team. Half never looked at them, some wound up in my opponents hands, the whole process was a waste of time. I learned from the experience & my mentors reminded me that "playbooks are for coaches".

Joe
"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"
Bill Walsh