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Author Topic: Tips for becoming a better Coach!  (Read 13463 times)

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Offline jrk5150

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Re: Tips for becoming a better Coach!
« Reply #30 on: December 31, 2013, 12:21:17 PM »
Agreed.

I guess my point is that I think O and D are somewhat interchangeable as far as what you prioritize, but ST's are not the equal of that at the youth level.  Doesn't mean they aren't important, just saying they aren't AS important.

I guess, thinking about it, I'd probably put ST's 5th or 6th on a list of priorities behind (in some order) blocking, tackling, offensive scheme, defensive scheme, and, if you want to include it in this conversation (vs. just sticking to X&O priorities), character.

Offline PSLCOACHROB

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Re: Tips for becoming a better Coach!
« Reply #31 on: December 31, 2013, 12:26:14 PM »
I include blocking with offense and tackling with defense. Defense would be #1, offense #2, mojo #3, specials #4. In fact, our specials don't usually fully develop until about week 4. You just have so little time in Pop Warner that they have to get put on the back burner. Maybe mojo should be #1 but I think that is one of those things that slowly develop over the course of a season.

Offline CoachCalande

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Re: Tips for becoming a better Coach!
« Reply #32 on: December 31, 2013, 12:48:09 PM »
Do you feel this is more of a problem at the youth level? I see it all the time. My header is very careful about who he has on his staff just for this reason. I see many staffs that are on completely different pages. I know it goes on at the hs level but I imagine that those guys buy in easier.

I don't think its a youth vs hs thing, I think its an experience thing. Learning to follow someone elses lead for the good of the whole organization sometimes takes time and experience.  Most guys that have been around awhile learn that the only way any team can be successful is by having everyone pull on the same end of the rope at the same time, in the same direction with all energy possible.  It does no good to pull mightily to the east if everyone is pulling south.  Then to sit and gripe that "they wouldn't listen" to your reasons for pulling east!

You might no agree with "south" but if you put your energy and effort into it, you may get there, where the hc wanted to go. if you don't give it your all, youll never get there and neither will the HC while youre around.

inexperience is the culprit.
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Offline MHcoach

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Re: Tips for becoming a better Coach!
« Reply #33 on: December 31, 2013, 12:56:48 PM »
Steve

My experience was that after being in control for so long I didn't understand not being in control. So when I saw things that weren't sound it drove me crazy. Guys blaming players & effort when it was really scheme just made no sense. I get having a difference of opinion, but you have to be basically sound.

I then took every chance I could to show how unsound it was instead of taking the needs of the team first. It definitely was an ego thing, I think I was unsure of my place & wanted everyone to know I could coach. I look back today & have regrets how I handled the situation, yet I'm not sure I would have changed my beliefs just how I did things.

Joe
"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"
Bill Walsh

Offline jrk5150

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Re: Tips for becoming a better Coach!
« Reply #34 on: December 31, 2013, 12:59:34 PM »
I include blocking with offense and tackling with defense. Defense would be #1, offense #2, mojo #3, specials #4. In fact, our specials don't usually fully develop until about week 4. You just have so little time in Pop Warner that they have to get put on the back burner. Maybe mojo should be #1 but I think that is one of those things that slowly develop over the course of a season.

I think we're in complete agreement.  I'd lump mojo in with character, as you include blocking/tackling with scheme.

Offline CoachCalande

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Re: Tips for becoming a better Coach!
« Reply #35 on: December 31, 2013, 01:02:25 PM »
Steve

My experience was that after being in control for so long I didn't understand not being in control. So when I saw things that weren't sound it drove me crazy. Guys blaming players & effort when it was really scheme just made no sense. I get having a difference of opinion, but you have to be basically sound.

I then took every chance I could to show how unsound it was instead of taking the needs of the team first. It definitely was an ego thing, I think I was unsure of my place & wanted everyone to know I could coach. I look back today & have regrets how I handled the situation, yet I'm not sure I would have changed my beliefs just how I did things.

Joe

Joe- one thing that drove me to be a HC was wanting control over the weight program and conditioning- its amazing how many views there are on what our kids workouts should look like. If every coach did things his own way our kids would never go anywhere with any of it and they would be very confused and not very skilled with the movements.

Each coach may have his own ideas but I wont give up control of something that took so long to obtain. We do things my way in that weight room. Usually when new potential assistants speak with me, they all seem to want to have a say on the workouts, ....its amazing.

What makes them better assistants is learning how we do it, why we do it and then seeing that it gets done.   
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Offline MHcoach

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Re: Tips for becoming a better Coach!
« Reply #36 on: December 31, 2013, 01:08:44 PM »
Steve

I always realize my limitations. I want no control over the weight room or the conditioning program. We have special advisers just for that purpose, our HC organizes that in total. As a HC I always had the most qualified guy in charge of that aspect & followed his lead. I think that's where as a coach you have to understand your strengths, when I am in the weight room I motivate & follow the program to the letter. I know where I don't know enough, & have no qualms about it.

It all goes back to coach what you know, and to add to that know what you know. Too many guys think they know something when they actually don't.

Joe
"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"
Bill Walsh

Offline DL

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Re: Tips for becoming a better Coach!
« Reply #37 on: December 31, 2013, 01:12:19 PM »
I hear you Joe and it is wise advise.

Honestly, I am probably much more interested in toying with practice formats and teaching methods and concepts and getting them better and more efficient in relation to running whatever we are doing or trying to accomplish then what scheme we are running.

It's a constant battle and evolution to determine how best to divide 10 hours of practice into conditioning, strength training, fundamentals, assignments, game week prep and intricacies and skills particular to your scheme.   

Not talking about just time division (I know it should be heavily weighted toward fundamentals), but how you are running drills and teaching generally, fundamentals included.   How you are motivating different personalities to get the best out of them.   How you are disciplining.   How you are utilizing staff and volunteer parents.    How you are dealing with parents and administrators and so on. 

Because of this I am not real interested in volunteer coaching further if I am not the head coach and can't do whatever I want.   

That being said.   I still enjoy trying and learning new things scheme wise though.   Can't help it.

However, 99% of the time whatever I am trying or contemplating trying someone somewhere has made it work in some capacity before.   So it is never "new" in the sense that I am ever doing something completely novel and untested.   It is often new to me though.   Can I make it work?   That always remains to be seen.   

I understand that there is danger there.   Can I effectively teach things that are new to me.   Are they age appropriate and so on.   Always trial and error involved in branching out.   But that is the one nice thing about being a volunteer youth coach versus coaching for a living.    It matters not for my family if I don't get asked back or I have sub-par season.    However, will it make me personally crazy if I completely fail?   Yes, but I do it anyway.     

Thing is I know I can win against most people at youth level duplicating things I have done in the past, but I tell myself I don't want to stay stagnant while they may get better.    Plus, maybe I just get irrationally excited about trying new things.     







Offline CoachDP

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Re: Tips for becoming a better Coach!
« Reply #38 on: December 31, 2013, 01:53:30 PM »
If you can punt in youth ball and have a solid defense you are very hard to beat. Many teams just go for it on 4th regardless of the situation.

Dave says hello.
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Offline CoachDP

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Re: Tips for becoming a better Coach!
« Reply #39 on: December 31, 2013, 01:57:01 PM »
I certainly agree but bad specials can get you beat.

Not only can they get you beat, but you will have to rely on them when you are facing the best of the best.  I see too many teams that don't work on it during the season, then in post-season games find themselves in game situations they haven't prepared for or needed and then find themselves completely inept at it.

--Dave
"If You Want To Have Better Players, Be A Better Coach."

The Mission Statement:
"I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

Offline CoachDP

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Re: Tips for becoming a better Coach!
« Reply #40 on: December 31, 2013, 02:01:44 PM »
Doesn't mean they aren't important, just saying they aren't AS important.

John, I think they are just as important when you are playing elite teams.  In youth ball in the regular season, you'll find few games that are decided by special teams.  But against evenly-matched teams, or elite competition, Special Teams can be the deciding factor.  I've seen it too many times in regional and national competition.

--Dave
"If You Want To Have Better Players, Be A Better Coach."

The Mission Statement:
"I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

Offline CoachDP

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Re: Tips for becoming a better Coach!
« Reply #41 on: December 31, 2013, 02:03:16 PM »
Guys blaming players & effort when it was really scheme just made no sense.

Dave says hello.
"If You Want To Have Better Players, Be A Better Coach."

The Mission Statement:
"I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

Offline jrk5150

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Re: Tips for becoming a better Coach!
« Reply #42 on: December 31, 2013, 03:47:31 PM »
John, I think they are just as important when you are playing elite teams.  In youth ball in the regular season, you'll find few games that are decided by special teams.  But against evenly-matched teams, or elite competition, Special Teams can be the deciding factor.  I've seen it too many times in regional and national competition.

--Dave

I get it, but my point is, you have to have the O and the D to go with it.  In the larger scheme of things, to be a good youth team, you still have to get your O and D working, ST's without the O and D aren't going to win you games.  For example, you can't win with O and ST's and a bad D.  I guess you  might be able to win with D and ST's and a slightly below average O, but it sure can't be lousy.  You CAN win with O and D and below average ST's, although frankly it's not that hard to be average on ST's, I don't really see any excuse for a team to actually be bad on ST's.

Can ST's lose you games?  Yes, but not as many games as a bad D or a bad O can lose you.

Again - I'm talking relative and applicable generally, certainly not to every situation.  In my current situation, I will spend enough time on ST's to where I believe I'm average and that's it, unless/until my situation changes and I feel like I need to be better than that.  And I may be wrong, but I think my situation is more common than yours or PSL's.  Most of us aren't playing for or in Disney.   :)

Offline PSLCOACHROB

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Re: Tips for becoming a better Coach!
« Reply #43 on: December 31, 2013, 04:08:28 PM »
Develop offense and defense first then by playoff time you should have specials up to par. We all want to win championships. Maybe not our first goal but we would be lying if we were to say championships wasn't somewhere in our minds. Eventually you will need specials. I think we all agree here that while specials teams are important, in youth they fall behind offense and defense.

We never played for Disney, just to win every game. ;) I never want to turn in our pads.

Offline JB

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Re: Tips for becoming a better Coach!
« Reply #44 on: December 31, 2013, 06:00:11 PM »
Find a team that is winning in your area & go ask if you can watch them practice. Coaches by nature love to share what we know, if you ask you will be surprised. Everyone has a HS or College team nearby that is successful. Go seek these teams out. It doesn't matter what system they run, you can learn how they do things & what they are trying to accomplish.

All good stuff...but THE ABOVE is what has helped me more than anything else...

I literally set up a schedule in spring to visit several college spring practices...the info shared and learned is unreal.
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