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Author Topic: Tips for becoming a better Coach!  (Read 13577 times)

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Offline MHcoach

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Re: Tips for becoming a better Coach!
« Reply #60 on: January 02, 2014, 11:16:50 AM »
John

I think you are looking at it backwards. Coaches like DP & Rob aren't working on these things because they are top flight coaches, rather they are top flight coaches because they are working on these things.

Does this make sense?

It goes back to one of my oldest maxims in coaching. You(the coach) always have to have an answer. It doesn't have to be the right answer, but an answer. There should never be anything that happens on the field that you aren't prepared for. Your answer doesn't have to be what my answer is, rather it's more important to be what your teams answer is. Great teams are never caught off guard, they have a plan for anything. This is where coaching becomes the issue.

If we are playing a power off tackle team for example, I may have 3 or 4 adjustments I can make. If no matter what I do our opponent just crushes us, then it may not have been the right answer. Either way I have prepared my players, & given them a chance.

Special teams are no different. During my time in Mint Hill we went 55-1, our 1 loss came in double OT on a missed PAT. Our Kicker broke his toe in the 3rd qtr. We had a backup kicker, that wasn't the problem, the back up kicker was also the LG on the PAT team. His replacement didn't step down & a Defender got a hand on the ball. It bounced off the cross bar. It was my fault we lost, & I took the responsibility for it. Never place the blame on a player.

Joe
"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"
Bill Walsh

Offline jrk5150

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Re: Tips for becoming a better Coach!
« Reply #61 on: January 02, 2014, 11:18:23 AM »
John,  If I'm successfully onside kicking after most scores in every game, and you never recover yours when you try it, I'm getting several extra possessions when I kick-off and getting great field position for my offense when you kick-off.  This is making a difference in every game.

--Dave

Yes, but to me, recovering on-sides kicks is that bare minimum I've talked about.  I agree you have to spend SOME time on specials.  And at some point I believe you hit a plateau with that particular skill - if you spend 20 minutes on it, I'm not sure you're going to get appreciably better jumping on a bouncing ball spending 30 minutes on it.  Or even an hour.

But let's expand your thought to the return game in general, because that is something that I could feasibly put more time and effort into.  We probably kick 30 balls at our return team during our last practice of the week.  We kick at them until I think they are as proficient gaining possession of the ball as I can reasonably make them.  That is my priority, and I stop there.  I could put in a return, and practice that, and I would bet at some point in the year we'd score on it.  What I can't say is whether we'd have scored anyway - we score a few times a year on kick returns just based on the returner working in space and making a play.  And I don't know that it would ever make a game level difference running a practiced schemed return vs. just relying on my best players making plays in space.  The games we've scored on specials, we were going to win no matter what we did.  The game we lost, they onsides kicked and we got them all.  I think.  But even if we didn't, that wouldn't be something I'd say "oh, we didn't work on that enough".  In fact, I have already forgotten about it if it did happen.  Yet there were certainly aspects of our O and D that I'm still kicking myself over that could have used more work.

Offline Dimson

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Re: Tips for becoming a better Coach!
« Reply #62 on: January 02, 2014, 11:34:33 AM »
  As I mentioned, I'm not dismissing them from importance, we spend time every week on kickoff, kick return, punting and PAT kicking (if we have a kicker). 
This is the weakest excuse I have ever heard and you are definitely not the only coach I have heard it from. How hard is it to find a kid who can kick a 20 yard field goal? Seriously. I trained a 8 year old kid who had never kicked in his life to make PATs. Every team has at least 1 kid who can put it through the uprights. Every single one. And if you play in a league or age group where there is no rushing the kick then you are at even a far bigger disadvantage if you do not kick PATs. Even if you have never trained a kicker you should be able to get them to line up 2-3 steps behind the ball and kick it with their toe, it is that easy. Just try out the whole team and coach up anyone that shows a little power. Promise, it will be well worth it.

Offline mahonz

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Re: Tips for becoming a better Coach!
« Reply #63 on: January 02, 2014, 11:37:12 AM »
This is the weakest excuse I have ever heard and you are definitely not the only coach I have heard it from. How hard is it to find a kid who can kick a 20 yard field goal? Seriously. I trained a 8 year old kid who had never kicked in his life to make PATs. Every team has at least 1 kid who can put it through the uprights. Every single one. And if you play in a league or age group where there is no rushing the kick then you are at even a far bigger disadvantage if you do not kick PATs. Even if you have never trained a kicker you should be able to get them to line up 2-3 steps behind the ball and kick it with their toe, it is that easy. Just try out the whole team and coach up anyone that shows a little power. Promise, it will be well worth it.

D

Kicking is the easy part....its the other 10 pieces that are a real task.
Collect moments, not wins.

Offline Dimson

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Re: Tips for becoming a better Coach!
« Reply #64 on: January 02, 2014, 11:40:26 AM »
D

Kicking is the easy part....its the other 10 pieces that are a real task.
Well then why in a divison that doesn't allow rushing the kicker do so few teams kick field goals? ???

Offline mahonz

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Re: Tips for becoming a better Coach!
« Reply #65 on: January 02, 2014, 11:42:09 AM »
Well then why in a divison that doesn't allow rushing the kicker do so few teams kick field goals? ???


D

I must have missed that point. I've never coached in a no rush league.

If that is the case....I retract....it is easy.  :)
Collect moments, not wins.

Offline JrTitan

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Re: Tips for becoming a better Coach!
« Reply #66 on: January 02, 2014, 11:43:01 AM »
.....I think unfortunately we're quibbling over minor degrees of emphasis....

Here's the catch for me - how much time do we spend on one facet of the game that may or may make a difference in a single game all year?  What's the bang for the buck on spending that time on something that might not be a difference maker vs. spending the time on things I KNOW can/will make a difference in most/all games?

At a minimum, my experience has been that you need to be sound (not necessarily great) in the kicking game.  For me, that's do the things that can get you beat:  fielding kicks (kick-offs, punts, on-sides etc.), pursuit/cover angles, punt protection and open field tackling.  Things that can win you games:  on-side kicks, returns, punt blocks and PAT/FG.

Along the lines of "show me your budget and I can tell you what your priorities are",  we have used the following allocation of practice time over the years:

  • Individual                                     20%
  • Offense  (group and team)          40%
  • Defense (group and team)           25%
  • Kicking game                                15%

For 6 hour practice week, that's about 10 mins a special.  We work some element of special teams every day.

"They call it coaching but it is teaching...You do not just tell them...you show them the reasons"

"You have to be smart enough to understand the game, and dumb enough to think it's important."

“…you have no bad habits to break...We either coach it or are allowing allowing it to happen.”

Offline MHcoach

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Re: Tips for becoming a better Coach!
« Reply #67 on: January 02, 2014, 11:44:40 AM »
Mike

That's why you are either coaching it or allowing it to happen.

It's not just about the Special Teams, it's about what you are coaching. Yes, you can spend too much time on Specials, but most Youth coaches spend too much time scrimmaging. Once again I think you have to look at it as a team thing. What does this team need at this point?

Joe
"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"
Bill Walsh

Offline Dimson

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Re: Tips for becoming a better Coach!
« Reply #68 on: January 02, 2014, 11:45:24 AM »

D

I must have missed that point. I've never coached in a no rush league.

If that is the case....I retract....it is easy.  :)
Well if you use the 1 step technique then all you have left to do is coach up a snapper and a holder. And we have non rush for 8 and 10U.

Online Michael

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Re: Tips for becoming a better Coach!
« Reply #69 on: January 02, 2014, 11:49:23 AM »
most Youth coaches spend too much time scrimmaging.

If you took the average youth practice, but did it efficiently, the practice would be about six minutes long.
“If you can't explain it to a six-year-old, you don't understand it yourself.” ― Albert Einstein

Offline CoachDP

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Re: Tips for becoming a better Coach!
« Reply #70 on: January 02, 2014, 11:50:43 AM »
if you spend 20 minutes on it, I'm not sure you're going to get appreciably better jumping on a bouncing ball spending 30 minutes on it.  Or even an hour.

--John, it's not the amount of time you spend on it, but how you spend the time that's important.  I see guys spend 30 minutes on KO and KOR and the last 5 minutes of it were identical to the first 5 minutes of it.  In other words, they were just repping it.

I don't know that it would ever make a game level difference running a practiced schemed return vs. just relying on my best players making plays in space.

--Of course it would make a difference if you do a good job of coaching it.  Your point is like saying, "I don't know if we'd score more points on offense if we worked harder on developing our offense."  If you know how to teach offense, it will.

The games we've scored on specials, we were going to win no matter what we did.  The game we lost, they onsides kicked and we got them all.  I think.  But even if we didn't, that wouldn't be something I'd say "oh, we didn't work on that enough".

--But Specials aren't limited to onside kicks.  I go back to the numerous times I've discussed where we punted SIX times in our 2005 conference championship game and yet won by 3 touchdowns.

--Dave

"If You Want To Have Better Players, Be A Better Coach."

The Mission Statement:
"I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

Offline CoachDP

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Re: Tips for becoming a better Coach!
« Reply #71 on: January 02, 2014, 11:52:05 AM »
we have non rush for 8 and 10U.

Chris, you've just disqualified yourself from this discussion.  ;)

--Dave
"If You Want To Have Better Players, Be A Better Coach."

The Mission Statement:
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Offline mahonz

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Re: Tips for becoming a better Coach!
« Reply #72 on: January 02, 2014, 11:53:04 AM »
Mike

That's why you are either coaching it or allowing it to happen.

It's not just about the Special Teams, it's about what you are coaching. Yes, you can spend too much time on Specials, but most Youth coaches spend too much time scrimmaging. Once again I think you have to look at it as a team thing. What does this team need at this point?

Joe

Joe

PAT kicks are 2 points in our League....1 point for run or pass.

It is critical for us to be able to kick a PAT ASAP. If our opponent cant then we go up two scores for every one TD.

We just finished our 9 year old season....Im guessing here but we have tried about 40 PAT kicks and made maybe 10...over two seasons. We got on a bit of a roll late last season so next year we should be good.

We used a unique formation that took advantage of the NFHS A Gap Rule.  A and B Gaps are 1 yard splits. B backs blocked the interior rush. Edge rusher were unblocked because they were too far away. Worked GREAT.


......................X.T....G.....C.....G.....T.Y

...............................B............B

......................................H

......................................K
« Last Edit: January 02, 2014, 11:57:40 AM by mahonz »
Collect moments, not wins.

Offline CoachDP

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Re: Tips for becoming a better Coach!
« Reply #73 on: January 02, 2014, 11:54:05 AM »
Well then why in a divison that doesn't allow rushing the kicker do so few teams kick field goals?

I could answer that, but I don't want to insult your entire conference.

--Dave
"If You Want To Have Better Players, Be A Better Coach."

The Mission Statement:
"I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

Offline Dimson

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Re: Tips for becoming a better Coach!
« Reply #74 on: January 02, 2014, 11:54:46 AM »
Chris, you've just disqualified yourself from this discussion.  ;)

--Dave
I hear the same lame "we don't have a kicker" excuse on all levels. It drives me insane.